49
   

Which is the oldest living language?

 
 
tamiliniyan
 
  1  
Mon 21 Nov, 2011 07:10 am
@Ramafuchs,
tamil
0 Replies
 
thetenor
 
  1  
Thu 24 Nov, 2011 01:32 pm
@SkeptikosExaminer,
Sanskrit is a descendent language of PIE (proto indo-european) language. To some extent, PIE has been reconstructed. This shows that the Indo-European languages descended from PIE, NOT from Sanskrit.
0 Replies
 
arunan99rs
 
  1  
Tue 24 Jan, 2012 10:38 pm
@dontmsg,
i totally agree with u bro ... i recently went to tamil nadu, a state in india and found out the exact same thing u quoted* and to be honest i was just frustrated and disappointed ... one of the oldest living languages in the world being treated like S*** in a country of its origin... the only thing i can say is that its very sad...
0 Replies
 
arunan99rs
 
  1  
Tue 24 Jan, 2012 10:43 pm
@Ramkey,
agreed bro... the indian govt. like we say in MY * memang tak boleh pakai* lolz... still sad tho tamil is being treated like s*** and not like the other classical languages... u know what they say? when theres still ppl who are envious of tamil , it would be very hard for it to soar high with pride. peace
0 Replies
 
arunan99rs
 
  1  
Tue 24 Jan, 2012 10:45 pm
@Ramafuchs,
well latin is pretty much dead.. still couldnt understand why lattin was even added to the options.. but ill go for tamil. and maybe sanskrit but still think tamil is older than sanskrit.
0 Replies
 
AnandPatel
 
  0  
Wed 28 Mar, 2012 04:32 pm
@vinsan,
Well said. There is an intentional (or non intentional) attempt to equate Tamil and Dravidian. In fact Sinhala is older than Tamil, and has a history from 6th century BCE. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sinhala_language
sheranudeep
 
  1  
Fri 18 May, 2012 03:09 am
@arunmurali,
I totally agree with you . Tamil is the oldest living languge on earth .
0 Replies
 
OmTamil
 
  2  
Sun 27 May, 2012 09:00 am
@Ramafuchs,
Tamilian civilisation formed the basis for Indian civilisation. Tamilian culture spread all over India according to S.A. Taylor and other researchers. Tamilians from the south migrated north when Kumari Kandam that is the southern tip of India was eroded by the sea.

These people settled around the banks of the Sindu river and over the years were responsible for the creation of Indus Valley civilisation according to Heras, a christian priest, who did research about that era.

The word Tamilar underwent many changes to Dravidia as follows, Tamilar-Tamilia-Tamila-Ithramila-Ithradida-Dravida, according to linguistic researchers and hence, it can be seen that the Sindu-Dravida civilasations was Tamilian civilisation.

Indus valley civilisation is more or less 7000 years old and there is documentary proof to show that it is very advanced, people were well versed in architecture, laying of roads, making clothes, furniture, jewellery and utensils. The Tamilians were very knowledgeable in the arts, business, religion, language and administration.

Tamilians in the Sindu area spoke in olden Tamil called Kodunth Tamil. When they migrated to other parts of India, the language changed based on the dialects of those areas. When people migrated to different countries, their language further changed as it was influenced by that country's dialect.

Lingustic researchers say that the north-dravidia tamil merged with languages from Sumeria, North Africa and even Europe. The north-dravidia language later merged with the Persians and European languages brought in by the Aaryans.

Aaryan, a white race, who were mostly shepherds, lived in the area between the Caspian Sea and Black Sea and the these people had to migrate due to natural disasters. They migrate in groups to Europe and Persia. From Persia, they moved to India through passing Khyber. As their language had many Persian words, scholars used that as evidence to show that they had stayed there for a long period.

Aarya vedas were a combination of old Indo-European languages. After settling in Sindu area their language absorbed old Tamil words. This was called piragrtham and most of the mantras were in this spoken language. Tamils also contributed to this new version. As most of the new words and pronunciation were not seen in European, Persian or Aarya dialects, it was deduced by scholars that the new words were Tamil. The language was corrected over the years and was known as Sanskrit which means a corrected language.

Edit [Moderator]: Link removed
0 Replies
 
maheshbabu007
 
  1  
Wed 13 Jun, 2012 05:33 am
@Ramafuchs,
i dono exactly but kannada is also added ti the list , which is te common language in karnataka
0 Replies
 
gungasnake
 
  0  
Wed 13 Jun, 2012 05:52 am
Gotta be Basque, Ainu, or whichever is most major of the several hundred Australian native languages. Those groups are directly descended from Cro Magnons which are genetically the same as everybody else more or less but the cultures, technologies, and histories were totally different. Some scholars claim relationships between Basque and Ainu.

In the internet age, such languages are not gonna survive. Fifty yeas from now I'd expect the following languages to still be there:

Germanic: English and German
Romance: Spanish, French, maybe Italian
Slavic: Russian
Semitic: Hebrew and Arabic
Indic: Hindi
Chinese: Mandarin and Cantonese
East Asian: Japanese and Korean

The kicker as I see it is the amount of work involved in learning any sort of a language; only historians and scholars should want to learn anything not on that list, and certainly not as a FIRST language. Teaching a kid anything not on that list as a first/basic language will most likely soon be viewed as being basically child abuse.
0 Replies
 
chandrakumar
 
  1  
Tue 24 Jul, 2012 07:47 am
@Ramafuchs,
the right answer to you is
tamil
proof:
Tamil is the longest surviving classical languages in the world from the available evidences.
-wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tamil_language
0 Replies
 
irishboy4
 
  1  
Mon 12 Nov, 2012 09:58 pm
Guys the oldest is Basque, then Tamil followed by Korean, Japanese then the Aboriginal group in Australia,.
0 Replies
 
laurap2282
 
  0  
Mon 3 Dec, 2012 01:27 pm
@Ramafuchs,
Tamil is the oldest langauge
0 Replies
 
nithi
 
  1  
Fri 14 Dec, 2012 10:10 am
@Ramafuchs,
Tamil
0 Replies
 
IsmailaGodHasHeard
 
  0  
Tue 18 Dec, 2012 09:16 pm
@Ramafuchs,
I vote for Hebrew.
0 Replies
 
Ambycar
 
  1  
Sun 6 Jan, 2013 11:44 am
@Ramafuchs,
One will not be wrong to conclude it as Tamil based on the hard evidences found.
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Sun 6 Jan, 2013 12:05 pm
@Ambycar,
Ambycar wrote:

One will not be wrong to conclude it as Tamil based on the hard evidences found.

But oddly you seem to forget to even source said claims of hard evidence. Can you cite your sources please? Would like some proof to back up your strong statement.
0 Replies
 
shopnoguro
 
  0  
Sat 2 Feb, 2013 10:29 am
@Ramafuchs,
Hebrew
0 Replies
 
avinash m chopde
 
  1  
Wed 6 Mar, 2013 06:50 am
@CalamityJane,
sumerian by africans before 100000 year BC and then bo 50000 and then dravidian tamil 10000 years and then sanskrit befor 4000 BC
0 Replies
 
avinash m chopde
 
  0  
Wed 6 Mar, 2013 06:51 am
@Ramafuchs,
tamil
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

deutsch anyone?? - Discussion by tell me why
Languages and Thought - Discussion by rosborne979
How many languages do you know ? - Discussion by mikinsmith
english to latin phrase translation - Discussion by chelsea84
What other languages would you use a2k in? - Discussion by Craven de Kere
Translation of names into Hebrew - Discussion by Sandra Karl
 
Copyright © 2020 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 04/09/2020 at 11:59:27