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rolling my rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrs- Italian and Spanish

 
 
catgirl
 
Reply Sat 17 Nov, 2007 08:00 am
Hola and Ciao!
I am an Australian, a native English speaker who has studied Spanish and I am just starting to learn the beautiful Italian language. My problem is this... I cannot roll my Rs! I managed to get away with it in Spanish (just) but it appears as though I cannot avoid it any longer. I just can't get my tounge to vibrate and the closest I can get is a guttural growl in the back of my throat! Has any any tips so I don't sound like a demented pirate?
Thank you for any suggestions and also any other little tips that may help me in my quest to conquer this lovely language.
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Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 7,489 • Replies: 37
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contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sat 17 Nov, 2007 08:14 am
0 Replies
 
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Sat 17 Nov, 2007 11:45 am
Good tips; I've had problems with this for as long as I've known Spanish (since, er, since the '70s), and would like to get better at it again as my nephew and I now speak a little Spanish to each other.
0 Replies
 
D1Doris
 
  1  
Reply Sat 17 Nov, 2007 01:47 pm
A teacher of mine once told a classmate to practise saying 'kedentebedood' faster and faster until it turned into 'krentenbrood' with two rolling r's.

It's a dutch word meaning raisin bread, but I guess it could work for non dutch speakers too. The first, the third and the fourth 'e' are a neutral vowel which we used to call 'shwa' at uni. I'm not sure if you can say that in english too.
The second 'e' is more like the spanish 'e' and the 'dood'/'brood' at the end sounds like 'dote'/'brote'.

This worked for my friend, so you might wanna give it a try...

Good luck anyway Smile
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sat 17 Nov, 2007 01:53 pm
Hey Doris! that's a great tip.

I just tried it out - and got it to work in a few minutes.

Brilliant!
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sat 17 Nov, 2007 02:04 pm
If you want to listen to a great triller, listen to the wonderful and admirable José Luis Rodriguez Zapatero. Spain is so lucky to have him.
0 Replies
 
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Dec, 2007 08:57 pm
When you say a word with an "r," the tip of the tongue touches the palate behind the upper front teeth. Sometimes it's necessary to say a word silently to oneself, before actually vocalizing it, so the tongue is going where it should. I used to practice on the name Rodriguez.
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Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Dec, 2007 08:57 pm
When you say a word with an "r," the tip of the tongue touches the palate behind the upper front teeth. Sometimes it's necessary to say a word silently to oneself, before actually vocalizing it, so the tongue is going where it should. I used to practice on the name Rodriguez.
0 Replies
 
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Dec, 2007 08:58 pm
When you say a word with an "r," the tip of the tongue touches the palate behind the upper front teeth. Sometimes it's necessary to say a word silently to oneself, before actually vocalizing it, so the tongue is going where it should. I used to practice on the name Rodriguez.
0 Replies
 
InfraBlue
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Dec, 2007 09:41 pm
Like for whistling, try touching the sides of your tongue against your two rows of upper pre-molars. Then, simultaneously touch the tip of your tongue between the roof of your mouth and upper incisors (the alveolar ridge, incidentally, that kind of rolled r is called the alveolar trill) and breath forcefully and heavily forcing the air through the tip of your tongue and alveolar ridge. You should feel the tip of your tongue flapping quickly against your alveolar ridge. Be sure to voice your breathing.

From Wikipedia

Features of the alveolar trill:

Its manner of articulation is trill, which means it is produced by vibrations of the tongue against the place of articulation.
Its place of articulation is alveolar which means it is articulated with the tip of the tongue against the alveolar ridge.
Its phonation type is voiced, which means the vocal cords are vibrating during the articulation.
It is an oral consonant, which means air is allowed to escape through the mouth.
It is a central consonant, which means it is produced by allowing the airstream to flow over the middle of the tongue, rather than the sides.
The airstream mechanism is pulmonic egressive, which means it is articulated by pushing air out of the lungs and through the vocal tract, rather than from the glottis or the mouth.
0 Replies
 
dagmaraka
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Dec, 2007 09:45 pm
Ha! I was trying to teach a friend of mine to roll her r's for hours and hours on end. We did the 'td' instead of 'r' trick, I drew detailed pictures were the tongue should be. After days, there was progress - I can now get her roll her 'r's when we're through with a bottle of wine or after a few beers.... but she still can't do it sober.
0 Replies
 
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Dec, 2007 09:48 pm
It's what makes shibboleths so effective.
0 Replies
 
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Dec, 2007 09:49 pm
You cannot say "carrramba" without rolling your "r"
If you do, drink more of dagmar's wine.
0 Replies
 
D1Doris
 
  1  
Reply Wed 26 Dec, 2007 01:44 am
There's a tiny percentage of people who are physically incapable of rolling their r's. Of course this information should be kept from anyone trying to learn it (:
0 Replies
 
sixmind80
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Feb, 2008 09:02 am
hi everyone,

i need some big help from any of you with my "r" pronountiation. ever since i was young, i never really learned how to pronounce it well. i've always been trying to fake it so that my front upper and lower teeth touch each other( so basically not using the tounge at all...dunno why i did this...=(

but i'm willing to learn now( that is if i'm capable of). how short is too short for your tounge size? like...if i force the air out, i can actually produce the "rrrrrr" sound with tounge. but then the problem is, i can't pronounce words as in just a vibrating "r". assuming my tounge is long enough, can any one tell me how to practice to say words with "r" ? i've tried so hard reading those words over and over and it's just not happening.

thanks
0 Replies
 
VaneEnglish
 
  1  
Reply Sat 31 May, 2008 01:04 pm
great tips!!!!! lots of practice that´s what´s most important!
0 Replies
 
Amigo
 
  1  
Reply Sat 31 May, 2008 01:09 pm
My buddys mexican grandmother used to tell us white people couldn't roll their R's because they had forked tounges. It's an old folk lore. Laughing

Sad I'm sorry
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 31 May, 2008 01:19 pm
Amigo wrote:
My buddys mexican grandmother used to tell us white people couldn't roll their R's because they had forked tounges. It's an old folk lore. Laughing

Sad I'm sorry


So Italians, Spanish, Bavarians, people speaking Low-German dialects etc etc are not white - but ...?
0 Replies
 
Amigo
 
  1  
Reply Sat 31 May, 2008 01:31 pm
If they can roll there R's then they don't have forked tounges.

It would make sence that Germans could roll there R's and Brits could not.
0 Replies
 
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Sat 31 May, 2008 01:34 pm
Hah! You should hear me roll my "rrrrrr" - simply perfect !! Laughing
0 Replies
 
 

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