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Exotic foods, have you ever eaten any?

 
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 31 Aug, 2007 09:57 am
We had jellyfish at our wedding luncheon at the Twin Dragon (I see potential for jokes in that sentence), but they were cooked.. plate of rubberbands with sauce.
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hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 31 Aug, 2007 10:36 am
i guess what's "standard fare" for some , may be called "exotic" by someone else :wink: ?

my dad used to fry up "calves' brain" as a special treat for me when i was a kid - i loved it .

a nice tender "horse steak" was also on our menu . last horse meat i ate , was a horse "hotdog" in germany about ten years ago - very good !

CARP was always on the dinner table for christmas and new-year's eve .
we used to buy it on our local market here in ontario during the winter months in the 50's and 60's also . it came right out of lake ontario , was EXCELLENT and 10 c a pound !
now that the lake is full of chemicals , fish from lake ontario are no longer on our dinnertable - that's the price of living in a modern society - dump the stuff in the lake , nobody will see it !

EEL was another special fish we used to eat in germany , but difficult to find in ontario . lake ontario has plenty of them , but they are full of poison now !

so now an exotic food is a stir fry with "bok choy" (grown in ontario Shocked )and "oyster sauce" - our lunch veg yesterday :wink:

i don't know if our european style breads can still be called "exotic" . they were certainly called "exotic" by the locals when we arrived in the 50's - to us "wonderbread" was exotic :wink:
hbg
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 31 Aug, 2007 10:42 am
Yeh, eel can be good. I think I've only had it in Japanese restaurants.
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hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 31 Aug, 2007 10:46 am
german kid enjoying a smoked eel - I WANT ONE TOO - i'm salivating !!!

http://www.moselaal.de/Aal_Essen_Kind.jpg
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hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 31 Aug, 2007 10:50 am
"jellied eel" with home-fries - please send some !!!

http://www.gosch-sylt.de/images/gosch/products/9093.jpg
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farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 31 Aug, 2007 11:36 am
UNAGI, excellent.

We used to trap eels in cone shaped eel weirs in the Delaware Bat along with crab traps. My mom would pickle em. Boy was zat some good eatin
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patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Fri 31 Aug, 2007 11:54 am
Mmm, unagi.



Had a piece of fluke fin (engawa) yesterday. Looked horrible. Flavor and texture were unobjectionable but also uninteresting.




When I was a kid I had a great uncle who used to go out into the marshes somewhere around Kern Canyon (or somewhere down Bakersfield way, anyway -- maybe just out in the tule of the highway somewhere) and jig a few buckets of frogs and have a big frogleg fry. A little sketchy (especially if you ever looked at the guy's hands), but pretty tasty.
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ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Fri 31 Aug, 2007 11:59 am
So how exactly are we defining exotic? Something our grandparents wouldn't have eaten regularly?
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 31 Aug, 2007 12:07 pm
I didn't try to define it. I think it depends on the person.

I'll add farmerman's grubs to my list of exotic.
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hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 31 Aug, 2007 06:39 pm
ebeth wrote :

Quote:
So how exactly are we defining exotic? Something our grandparents wouldn't have eaten regularly?


how about :
something our grandparents WOULD have eaten regularly :wink: Question
such as pig snouts and trotters - "snuten un poten" in hamburg dialect .
not to give the wrong impression , my parents also liked a good pork-roast or roast-beef :wink: , and plenty of fresh seafood .

how about the famous hamburg dish : pears , green beans and a slab of double-smoked bacon :wink: ?
(i suspect someone's mouth is watering !)
hbg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/94/Birnen,_Bohnen_und_Speck.jpg/180px-Birnen,_Bohnen_und_Speck.jpg
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farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 31 Aug, 2007 09:04 pm
Ive never had a bowl of COUNT CHOCULA or a chitling.
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Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Sep, 2007 10:40 am
My mother cooked tongue on a regular basis. After 15 years in this neck of the woods, I finally found a butcher who would special order tongue.
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smorgs
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Sep, 2007 10:48 am
Is it true that all eels originate in the Sargasso Sea?

How come? And how do they get to America?

Please enlighten, it IS A2K, after all.

x
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hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Sep, 2007 11:38 am
for smorgs eddercation :wink: :
(it's also what we were taught in high-school biology - so it must be right Laughing ) . how else would i have turned out to be so smart , yet understand so little ?)
hbg

Quote:
European eel
(Anguilla anguilla)


Classification and names
Fish; order: Anguilliformes (eels and morays), family: Anguillidae (freshwater eels)
In French/Français: anguille
In Spanish/Español: anguila
In German/Deutsch: : Aal
In Dutch/Nederlands: aal, paling

Description
Life history
Born in Sargasso Sea as leptocephali from eggs around 1.1 mm in diametre and look like a curled up leaf. As they reach European waters following ocean currents they become glass eels or elvers and are almost transparent and later olive-green. They then become small eels and most begin to swim up rivers.
Description of eels in freshwater
Long snake-like body with 110-120 vertebrae. Lower jaw protruding. Long dorsal and ventral fins, which begin behind gill and end together at end of tail.Small, round eyes.Tough, slimy skin.
Colour: back dark (various colours possible, blue, olive green, red, brown and black) and underside light (white or yellowish)
Length: males up to 50 cm, females up to 1 m. (record female 130 cm).

After several years eels become silver eels when their backs become black and their underside lighty coloured. Their eyes become bigger and their head broader and pointed. They then start swimming back to the Sargasso Sea.


Distribution
Spawn in Sargasso Sea. As Eels in rivers of the Eastern North Atlantic from the White Sea, Baltic Sea and North Sea in the north to North Africa, the Mediterranean Sea and the Black Sea in the south.
Migration: Eels are catadromous. This means they are born in salt water and become adults in fresh water. European eels are born in the Sargasso Sea (in the North Atlantic Ocean) as leptocephali and travel to European in about three years, following water currents. They then become glass eels or elvers in European waters and swim up rivers and lakes. After severeal years they travel back down river as adults and then swim back to the Sargasso Sea to spawn and die.
European Eels from different areas appear to be genetically different.

Habitat
As leptocephali in ocean waters. Become elvers before entering freshwater and then become young eels.
Eels live in on the bottom of freshwaters (e.g. rivers, brooks, lakes, ponds) in mud and under rocks in temperatures between 0 and 30°C and up to elevations of 1,000 m. In lesser numbers also in salt and brackish coastal waters.
Eels in lower parts of rivers tend to be smaller and are more often male. Females usually swim further up river.

Food
Eat almost all aquatic fauna (in salt and in freshwater). Prefer fish and invertibrates.

Behaviour & Reproduction
Sociability: elvers and young eels are sometimes found in schools
Mobility: can travel upstream and over land. Swim 20-40 km/day to Sargasso Sea
Sexual maturity: varies, males after 6-12 years in freshwater, females after 9-10 years in freshwater
Reproduction capacity: female lays millions of eggs
Reproduction period: eels travel to sea September-November, sperm and eggs are produced en route to Sargasso Sea, spawning in Sargasso Sea in March/April
Life span: drifting from Sargasso Sea to Europe as leptocephali takes 3 years; males stay 6-12 years in freshwater, females stay 9-20 years in freshwater. They die after spawning. Oldest eel 85 year.

Predation and competition
Eels are eaten by birds and otters.

Threats

Overfishing of elvers and full-grown eels
Habitat loss, physical obstructions on migrating route
Parasites
Protection
No protection status.

Numbers
Unknown.




SOURCE :
COASTAL GUIDE
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InfraBlue
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Sep, 2007 12:33 pm
ehBeth wrote:
So how exactly are we defining exotic? Something our grandparents wouldn't have eaten regularly?


No.

Exotic to me is something my grandmother would have eaten, like chick soup, or corn smut, huitlacoche.

I regularly eat menudo, tripe soup. Sometimes, for something extra special, pigs feet are added.

mmm, menudo. . .
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Sep, 2007 12:50 pm
More on huitlacoche, which I've heard of but not tried -

http://www.gourmetsleuth.com/huitlacoche.htm




On tripe, I've had it in soup in a french restaurant in new york city, but I haven't had menudo, always going for the posole instead.

There was a hilarious article, probably now part of one of his books, by Calvin Trillin in a long ago New Yorker, about his making tripe soup from scratch (that is, uncleaned to start out) in his kitchen...
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hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Sep, 2007 04:39 pm
are roasted pigtails part of exotic cuisine ?
i know of someone who seems to be particularly fond of those little appendages Shocked Laughing
hbg
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patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Sep, 2007 05:01 pm
I've seen where tripe comes from, had my hands in it, cut it apart.








No way in hell am I eating that ****. No intestines, no filters (spleen, kidney), and no glands. Except shellfish, which are all of those things rolled into one. I do like me a tasty mollusk.
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smorgs
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Sep, 2007 12:10 am
Thank you, hamburger...

Most illuminating.

x
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Francis
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Sep, 2007 12:15 am
I just came home from a country where I had (once) some exotic food:


http://www.terra-economica.info/IMG/jpg/00035_P4.jpg
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