1
   

"Young people are the new puritans"

 
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 Jul, 2007 12:56 pm
Setanta wrote:
In 1969, you could be drafted and die in a foreign war, which is not true today.

In 1969, you could contract a venereal disease, and have no access to a public health system which were prepared to deal with your condition; that is not true today.

In 1969, if you were involved in an automobile accident, the odds were high that there were no seat belts; there were no shoulder belts (except in race cars or exotic imports), there were no child car seats or other child restraints, and there were no air bags--highway deaths routinely topped 50,000 per annum.

In 1969, you could be exposed to cigarette, cigar or pipe smoke sitting in your doctor's waiting room.

In 1969, we could never have had this conversation, because there were no personal computers, and there was no internet.

In 1969, if you were in a highway accident, there was no "911" center to call, and no cell phones to use to call for help.

I enjoyed myself, too--but then, i was a callow, ignorant youth.

I don't believe in "the good ol' days."

Your points are well taken.
I appreciate modern technology, and I try to keep up,
but I was thinking of enjoyment of my family and my other good friends
to whom I have no further access.

If I found Aladin 's lamp,
one of my wishes wud be to be able to travel back in time
and correct my mistakes.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 Jul, 2007 12:58 pm
ehBeth wrote:
Hey David - I just wanted to come by and say thanks for posting in a more readable way -
it really is making a difference in my ability to read and appreciate some of your posts.


(not saying I agree with everything you say, but I do appreciate the opportunity to actually read your posts)

OK.
I am exercising some degree of self restraint.



I feel like I am speaking in a long monotone.
David
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 Jul, 2007 01:02 pm
I remember, about 50 years ago,
sometimes retyping a word several times,
to make the ink blacker and bolder for the sake of emfasis.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 Jul, 2007 01:04 pm
As I recall,
I never got any complaints about that.
0 Replies
 
aidan
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 Jul, 2007 10:51 pm
OmSigDAVID wrote:
ehBeth wrote:
Hey David - I just wanted to come by and say thanks for posting in a more readable way -
it really is making a difference in my ability to read and appreciate some of your posts.


(not saying I agree with everything you say, but I do appreciate the opportunity to actually read your posts)

OK.
I am exercising some degree of self restraint.



I feel like I am speaking in a long monotone.

David


This from the founder of a chapter of YOUNG AMERICANS FOR FREEDOM??!!

I guess we all do what we gotta do. I find it sad though-you already know that so I won't harp anymore on it.

( Just kidding Laughing . I just liked your joke about free (or reasonably priced) love. Wanted to let you know that and say hello.).

No, I think puritanism is a function of personality- not age. I think puritanical people feel more comfortable functioning within prescribed limits and only feel comfortable when other people function within prescribed limits. And the worst part about them is that they want everyone to function within the SAME prescribed limits!! How boring is that?!

I think their lack of imagination infuses them with the feeling that they are out of control if there is no prescribed limit for them (or others) to fit themselves inside of.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Jul, 2007 01:00 am
aidan wrote:
OmSigDAVID wrote:
ehBeth wrote:
Hey David - I just wanted to come by and say thanks for posting in a more readable way -
it really is making a difference in my ability to read and appreciate some of your posts.


(not saying I agree with everything you say, but I do appreciate the opportunity to actually read your posts)

OK.
I am exercising some degree of self restraint.



I feel like I am speaking in a long monotone.

David


This from the founder of a chapter of YOUNG AMERICANS FOR FREEDOM??!!

I guess we all do what we gotta do.
I find it sad though-you already know that so I won't harp anymore on it.

Quote:
( Just kidding Laughing . I just liked your joke about free (or reasonably priced) love.
Wanted to let you know that and say hello.).

Thank u;
counterhello.







Quote:

No, I think puritanism is a function of personality- not age
.
I doubt that ideology results from age.
I was always a libertarian hedonist.






Quote:
I think puritanical people feel more comfortable functioning within prescribed limits and only feel comfortable when other people function within prescribed limits. And the worst part about them is that they want everyone to function within the SAME prescribed limits!! How boring is that?!

Yeah.







Quote:
I think their lack of imagination infuses them with the feeling that they are out of control if there is no prescribed limit for them (or others) to fit themselves inside of.

So stipulated !

Find any good Beef Wellington ?
David
0 Replies
 
aidan
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Jul, 2007 11:58 am
Quote:
Quote:

No, I think puritanism is a function of personality- not age
.
I doubt that ideology results from age.
I was always a libertarian hedonist.


I think I alway have been too. That's how I recognized you- a fellow libertarian heonist Laughing .



Quote:
Find any good Beef Wellington ?
David[/b]

Not yet- I'm saving the opportunity for that deliciousness for August in NYC. Although, if the name of the restaurant (One if by land- Two if by sea) indicates they also serve seafood- that may turn out to be a hard choice for me.

Hope you are enjoying your summer David. I'm enjoying mine. I did over a thousand miles in four days this week-end- but all the driving was worth it. I wouldn't have missed one thing that I saw.
Less than a month, and I will be one of your fellow residents of the great state of New York. I can't believe it!
I'll talk to you later and will see you fairly soon-Rebecca.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Jul, 2007 01:35 am
aidan wrote:
Quote:
Quote:

No, I think puritanism is a function of personality- not age
.
I doubt that ideology results from age.
I was always a libertarian hedonist.


Quote:
I think I alway have been too.
That's how I recognized you- a fellow libertarian heonist Laughing .

I am honored to be in your filosofical company.


Quote:
Find any good Beef Wellington ?
David[/b]

Quote:
Not yet- I'm saving the opportunity for that deliciousness for August in NYC.
Although, if the name of the restaurant (One if by land- Two if by sea)
indicates they also serve seafood-
that may turn out to be a hard choice for me.

The danger of the place
is that u may get sprain of the brain
from the strain of choosing from among the enticements.




Quote:
Hope you are enjoying your summer David. I'm enjoying mine.
I did over a thousand miles in four days this week-end- but all the driving was worth it.
I wouldn't have missed one thing that I saw.

That 's a lot of driving
Will u let me know what u saw ?



Quote:
Less than a month, and I will be one of your fellow residents of the great state of New York. I can't believe it!
I'll talk to you later and will see you fairly soon-Rebecca.

I 'm looking forward to it
David
0 Replies
 
aidan
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Jul, 2007 03:27 am
Quote:
Quote:
I think I alway have been too.
That's how I recognized you- a fellow libertarian heonist Laughing .

I am honored to be in your filosofical company.

Thank you- that's very nice of you to say.



Quote:
The danger of the place
is that u may get sprain of the brain
from the strain of choosing from among the enticements.

Well, maybe I'll just skip lunch so I'll be really, really hungry, so I can try a few different things -not whole entrees mind you- I'm not that big of an eater- but sometimes you can get smaller versions of the entrees as starters (appetizers- I'll have to start reverting back to US terminology). I like doing that because it allows me to enjoy variety- which is always a plus.


Quote:
Quote:
Hope you are enjoying your summer David. I'm enjoying mine.
I did over a thousand miles in four days this week-end- but all the driving was worth it.
I wouldn't have missed one thing that I saw.

That 's a lot of driving
Will u let me know what u saw ?

I waited a week to see if anyone would still want to comment on the topic, but figured since they didn't, I'd share a few pictures. I went to Mt. Snowdon and this place in Wales called Betswy Coed that Mathos (another poster on this forum) told me about. There is a beautiful waterfall there called Swallow Falls. Although it'd been raining the whole weekend, and even that very morning- by the afternoon it was a perfect, sunny day, so I got some good pictures of the falls:
http://i85.photobucket.com/albums/k46/aidan_010/HPIM3094-2.jpg

This is a picture from Mt. Snowdon
http://i85.photobucket.com/albums/k46/aidan_010/HPIM3072-2.jpg



Quote:
Quote:
Less than a month, and I will be one of your fellow residents of the great state of New York. I can't believe it!
I'll talk to you later and will see you fairly soon-Rebecca.

I 'm looking forward to it
David
[/QUOTE]
I'm starting to...though it's very difficult to leave here. But I've got stuff lined up to work next summer, and a friend of mine is coming out in October to do this TransCanadian train trip with me- which is something we've both always wanted to do- so I have things to look forward to. That's what I need to have to get myself feeling able to leave someplace I've come to love with all my being.

I also have our dinner to look forward to Laughing . I hope you're as funny in real life as you are on here. I'll warn you ahead of time- I'm probably a little more scatterbrained and/or spacy/silly in real life than I am on here. Don't be surprised if I knock over at least one glass of water and ask you to show me how to answer my cell phone if it rings- that's the kind of stuff I do in real life.

Well David- I'm off to Greece tomorrow. I'll call you when I get back to the US which will be two weeks from today.

Take care- Rebecca
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Jul, 2007 11:03 pm
aidan wrote:
Quote:
Quote:

No, I think puritanism is a function of personality- not age
.
I doubt that ideology results from age.
I was always a libertarian hedonist.


I think I alway have been too. That's how I recognized you- a fellow libertarian heonist Laughing .



Quote:
Find any good Beef Wellington ?
David[/b]

Not yet- I'm saving the opportunity for that deliciousness for August in NYC. Although, if the name of the restaurant (One if by land- Two if by sea) indicates they also serve seafood- that may turn out to be a hard choice for me.

Hope you are enjoying your summer David. I'm enjoying mine. I did over a thousand miles in four days this week-end- but all the driving was worth it. I wouldn't have missed one thing that I saw.
Less than a month, and I will be one of your fellow residents of the great state of New York. I can't believe it!
I'll talk to you later and will see you fairly soon-Rebecca.

Some very beautiful pictures, Rebecca.
The waterfall is singularly beautiful.

Is there any element of your English experience
that has evoked your love particularly ?
David
0 Replies
 
aidan
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Jul, 2007 11:54 pm
Quote:
Some very beautiful pictures, Rebecca.
The waterfall is singularly beautiful.

Thank you. Yes, it was. One of the most beautiful things I've seen (the real thing- not the photo).
Quote:
Is there any element of your English experience
that has evoked your love particularly ?

The people- in general- as a nation. I don't know how to explain it, but there's a certain gentle willingness to pause and engage long enough to make connections, no matter how fleeting that connection might turn out to be, that I really respond to and enjoy. Very different than in the US where everything is rush, rush, rush, and strangers are strangers and people are seemingly willing to allow them to remain just that...

And in terms of specific people- I've made truer and more intimate friends here in three years than I feel that I had made in all the years of my life in the US. There's just a different level of communication available to one here- or at least it was made available to me.

And I loved it.

I'll tell you all about it when you see me- believe me- you won't be able to shut me up and you'll probably wish you'd never asked.... Laughing
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sun 29 Jul, 2007 10:49 am
aidan wrote:
Quote:
Some very beautiful pictures, Rebecca.
The waterfall is singularly beautiful.

Thank you. Yes, it was. One of the most beautiful things I've seen (the real thing- not the photo).
Quote:
Is there any element of your English experience
that has evoked your love particularly ?

The people- in general- as a nation. I don't know how to explain it, but there's a certain gentle willingness to pause and engage long enough to make connections, no matter how fleeting that connection might turn out to be, that I really respond to and enjoy. Very different than in the US where everything is rush, rush, rush, and strangers are strangers and people are seemingly willing to allow them to remain just that...

And in terms of specific people- I've made truer and more intimate friends here in three years than I feel that I had made in all the years of my life in the US. There's just a different level of communication available to one here- or at least it was made available to me.

And I loved it.

I'll tell you all about it when you see me- believe me- you won't be able to shut me up and you'll probably wish you'd never asked.... Laughing

That assessment seems quite inconsistent
with the vaunted English stiff upper lip reserve.

I thought that thay were known for being cold.
David
0 Replies
 
aidan
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Aug, 2007 04:08 am
OmSigDAVID wrote:
aidan wrote:
Quote:
Some very beautiful pictures, Rebecca.
The waterfall is singularly beautiful.

Thank you. Yes, it was. One of the most beautiful things I've seen (the real thing- not the photo).
Quote:
Is there any element of your English experience
that has evoked your love particularly ?

The people- in general- as a nation. I don't know how to explain it, but there's a certain gentle willingness to pause and engage long enough to make connections, no matter how fleeting that connection might turn out to be, that I really respond to and enjoy. Very different than in the US where everything is rush, rush, rush, and strangers are strangers and people are seemingly willing to allow them to remain just that...

And in terms of specific people- I've made truer and more intimate friends here in three years than I feel that I had made in all the years of my life in the US. There's just a different level of communication available to one here- or at least it was made available to me.

And I loved it.

I'll tell you all about it when you see me- believe me- you won't be able to shut me up and you'll probably wish you'd never asked.... Laughing

That assessment seems quite inconsistent
with the vaunted English stiff upper lip reserve.

I thought that thay were known for being cold.
David


Never! I mean I guess they might be known for being cold, but in reality they aren't- or as I've said- they never were to me.

Although this is kind of funny. I was walking with a friend on Dartmoor and this Englishwoman came walking the other way so the configuration was an English person on one side, me (an American) in the middle and my English friend on the other side.

The English woman mumbled, "Afternoon..." my friend just kind of grunted an unintelligible response that I think was supposed to pass as a greeting, and I said very clearly (and in fact almost as if I were singing, he later told me), "Hello..." with a big smile. He, my friend just started laughing at the juxtaposition of attitude or temperament manifested in that simple exchange. He does always talk about a difference in energy level and enthusiasm- which he says he finds somewhat offputting and almost put on in some Americans that he hasn't really gotten to know. I think he finally accepts that my energy, enthusiasm and friendliness are real- and/or at the very least well-intentioned, benign, and part of my latent personality-and maybe would be a part of me whether I was American or English by birth.

I've certainly noticed that some Americans will do anything to avoid greeting a stranger, so friendliness is not an innate trait I would ascribe to Americans versus Brits.

The stiff upper lip thing might be true-but not among the Scottish women I've met. They tear up (cry) even quicker than I do and are very expressive of their feelings.

I already miss being called, "My Darlin'" and "My lovely", which was an everyday occurrence in Somerset. I guess I'll have to settle for, "Yeah, what do you want?" which is more typical here in NJ and NY. Although someone did say to me the other day- "Go ahead sweetheart". That was kind of heartwarming.
0 Replies
 
 

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