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Best actor ever

 
 
Lightwizard
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Jun, 2007 04:43 pm
Letty wrote:
Can't compete with them Italians, oh, Wizard of light. They paint ceilings better than anyone I know. Razz


Again, with or without a roller?

(Actually my house painter when I was involved with interior design was Italian!)

But, then, I also used one of the artist from Disneyland and he painted a portion of the Sistine Chapel in a domed entryway and I illuminated it from the surrounding sophet. You had to say three Hail Mary's as you entered the house.
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edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Jun, 2007 04:43 pm
There used to be a sort of a rivalry between Edward G Robinson and Paul Muni, to see which could garner the best character parts, and people would argue which was the better actor.
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Lightwizard
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Jun, 2007 04:44 pm
I'd better lay off the coffee -- I spelled "soffit" as "sophet."
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gustavratzenhofer
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Jun, 2007 04:46 pm
We have never considered you to be intelligent, LIght Wizard, and, thus, your spelling errors, have gained a general acceptability here.
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gustavratzenhofer
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Jun, 2007 04:47 pm
I'm just kidding, you big lug! Give me a hug!

Let's talk movies!
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Lightwizard
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Jun, 2007 04:53 pm
Oh, you were not kidding, you cad. Laughing
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Letty
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Jun, 2007 05:16 pm
Seriously, Kevin Anderson was outstanding as Robert Kennedy in the movie ,Hoffa. I didn't really recognize him. And Val Kilmer in Tombstone was fabulous. (sorry, I'm limited on my adjectives today)
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Lightwizard
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Jun, 2007 05:39 pm
That was the best Doc Holiday of all time. He literally stole that movie.

I've always thought Kevin Anderson was very underrated. He comes from the Shakespearean stage if my memory serves me.

Another British import is Kenneth Branagh whose "Henry V" is the benchmark performance for that role even over, dare I say, Sir Laurence Olivier. He directed the film and I have the soundtrack which I love to put into my car CD player. Did not care much for his version of "Frankenstein" -- it was more like an ad for Solo-Flex exercise equipment as far as his portrayal, but every actor has to have at least one movie and expects a pass from their fans.

I think Keanu Reeves could turn in a good performance in a serious themed movie but his agent should be shot for getting him into loser vehicles. I actually did like him in Coppolla's "Dracula," but, after all, he had to play up against Sir Anthony Hopkins and Gary Oldman (still the only Dracula that rivals Bela Legosi). Oldman was a smooth, sophisticated Dracula which made him even more terrifying. The ending scenes in that film are spellbinding (well, and a tad gory, but how does one expect Dracula to meet his end?)
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dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Jun, 2007 05:53 pm
Letty wrote:
Val Kilmer in Tombstone was fabulous.

very true
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wandeljw
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Jun, 2007 06:08 pm
Letty and LW,

Kevin Anderson came out of Chicago's Steppenwolf Theater Company (as did John Malkovich, Gary Sinise, Bill Pullman, and a few others I can't remember right now).
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Lightwizard
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Jun, 2007 06:21 pm
Well, you're suppose to remember! Very Happy
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Letty
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Jun, 2007 07:05 pm
Wandel, I have been really finding out stuff about Steppenwolf Theatre Company, and I am guessing that the name comes from Hermann Hesse.

Amazing what one can learn from threads such as these. There's a rock group that took their name from his Steppenwolf.

Thank you.
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eoe
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Jun, 2007 09:08 pm
Or was it the other way around Letty? Could the theatre have taken their name from the group?
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wandeljw
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 Jun, 2007 04:56 am
Wikipedia gives a nice short history of Steppenwolf Theater Company:

Quote:
Steppenwolf Theatre Company is a Tony Award-winning Chicago theatre company founded in 1974 by Gary Sinise, Terry Kinney and Jeff Perry in the basement of a church in Highland Park, Illinois. Its name comes from the Herman Hesse book. Its current production manager is Al Franklin.

In 1980, the theater company moved into a 134-seat theater at the Jane Addams Hull House Center on North Broadway Avenue in the city proper. Two years later, the company moved to a 211-seat facility at 2851 North Halsted, which was their home until 1991, when they completed construction on and moved into their current theater complex at 1650 North Halsted. With its current subscription base of more than 20,000, the company has helped make Chicago a leading city in the performing arts.

In its inaugural season, the company presented Paul Zindel's And Miss Reardon Drinks a Little, Grease, Tom Stoppard's Rosencrantz And Guildenstern Are Dead, and Tennessee Williams' The Glass Menagerie.

In 1982, Sam Shepard's True West, starring Sinise and John Malkovich, was the first of many Steppenwolf productions to travel to New York City. In 1994, the company made its Los Angeles debut with Steve Martin's first play, Picasso at the Lapin Agile.

Through its New Plays Initiative, the company maintains ongoing relationships with writers of international prominence and supports the work of aspiring and mid-career playwrights. In 1988, Steppenwolf presented the world premiere of The Grapes of Wrath, based on the John Steinbeck novel, which eventually went on to win the Tony Award for Best Play. In 2000 it presented the world premiere of Austin Pendleton's Orson's Shadow, which subsequently was staged off-Broadway and by regional theatres throughout the country. Steppewolf operates several internship programs for students or young professionals.

Steppenwolf productions helped to launch the careers of a number of well-known American actors, including Gary Sinise, John Malkovich, Joan Allen, John Mahoney, Martha Plimpton, Francis Guinan, Glenne Headly, Gary Cole, Kathryn Erbe, and Laurie Metcalf.

Among its many honors are a 1985 Tony Award for Regional Theatre Excellence and a 1998 National Medal of Arts. The company currently is in its 31st season.
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Lightwizard
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 Jun, 2007 07:07 am
Their origin, I would think, are connected to the novel by Herman Hesse, "Steppenwolf."
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eoe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 Jun, 2007 08:32 am
I sure hope so. Being from Chicago, of course I've heard of the Steppenwolf Theatre Company and I think I've seen at least one production that I recall, on a cold snowy night many, many years ago.

It would be rather silly for a theatre to adopt the name of a music group but hey, stranger things have happened.
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Lightwizard
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 Jun, 2007 08:55 am
Steppenwolf may be a fairly rare name but it could be the angel or benefactor who started the theater is surnamed Steppenwolf.

Here is a genealogy:


http://www.surnameweb.org/genealogy/index.php?s_Surnames=Steppenwolf
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Wilso
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 Jun, 2007 09:20 am
eoe wrote:
Now Lightwizard, I do recall Tony Randall in "The Seven Faces..." and he was very, very good but better than Eddie Murphy's seven characters in "Nutty Professor"? I don't think so. Perhaps a more sophisticated lot with Pan and Medusa, but not necessarily better. Nope. No one does that better than Eddie.


I thought the Nutty Professor was complete garbage.
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eoe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 Jun, 2007 09:22 am
That's funny coming from Kenny.
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Lightwizard
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 Jun, 2007 01:48 pm
The Eddie Murphy "The Nutty Professor" didn't just get mixed reviews from the critics -- the IMDb user rating is a measly 5.7 our of 10. Tony Randall did his "seven faces" (actually he also was an eighth character in the film that a lot of people miss) using no CGI tricks. Murphy's incognitos were doctored up with computer tweaking. Of course, they both relied on very talented make-up artists!

I know I really never care to sit through the Eddie Murphy opus again, but the George Pal film is a definite favorite.
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