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Molly's gone...

 
 
sozobe
 
Reply Wed 31 Jan, 2007 07:53 pm
Molly Ivins has died, at age 62.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070201/ap_on_re_us/obit_ivins

http://d.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/ap/20070126/capt.txhou50201261846.ivins_cancer_txhou502.jpg
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Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 2,346 • Replies: 34
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 31 Jan, 2007 07:56 pm
Thank you for letting me know.. I'd rather hear it from you.

Girl with a grip.
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sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Wed 31 Jan, 2007 08:00 pm
I knew she was very very sick but this is still one of those "does not compute" deaths -- Molly Ivins? It's not possible...

Sigh...
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Joe Nation
 
  1  
Reply Wed 31 Jan, 2007 08:02 pm
Oh no. I've been in love with her since she whupped up on Dick Nixon.

joe
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littlek
 
  1  
Reply Wed 31 Jan, 2007 08:04 pm
<sigh>
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gustavratzenhofer
 
  1  
Reply Wed 31 Jan, 2007 08:12 pm
I have to call a friend of mine (yes, I do have some) and let him know the news. He is Molly's biggest fan.

Thanks for the heads up, soz.
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Gala
 
  1  
Reply Wed 31 Jan, 2007 08:51 pm
And I thought Ann Richards death was premature...
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snood
 
  1  
Reply Wed 31 Jan, 2007 09:33 pm
That's really sad news, Soz. She will be missed.
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mac11
 
  1  
Reply Wed 31 Jan, 2007 10:11 pm
Thanks for posting this, soz. I hadn't heard.
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dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Wed 31 Jan, 2007 11:22 pm
Damn.


I hope it was peaceful for her.
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 31 Jan, 2007 11:27 pm
Wonderful photo.
I've been sobbing around.
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Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Wed 31 Jan, 2007 11:38 pm
Bummer. Thanks for the notice, Soz, but it is bad news to hear. Here's a bit of Molly at her best and a warning for all of us:

John Nichols in 'Remembering Molly Ivins' wrote:
She explained to disbelieving Minnesotans and Mainers that, yes, these men really were as mean, as self-serving and as delusional as they seemed. The book that Molly and her pal Lou Dubose wrote about their homeboy-in-chief, Shrub: The Short But Happy Political Life of George W. Bush (Random House, 2000), was the essential exposé of the man the Supreme Court elected President. And Ivins's columns tore away any pretense of civility or citizenship erected by the likes of Karl Rove.

When Washington pundits started counseling bipartisanship after voters routed the Republicans in the 2006 elections, Molly wrote, "The sheer pleasure of getting lessons in etiquette from Karl Rove and the right-wing media passeth all understanding. Ever since 1994, the Republican Party has gone after Democrats with the frenzy of a foaming mad dog. There was the impeachment of Bill Clinton, not to mention the trashing of both Clinton and his wife--accused of everything from selling drugs to murder--all orchestrated by that paragon of manners, Tom DeLay.... So after 12 years of tolerating lying, cheating and corruption, the press is prepared to lecture Democrats on how to behave with bipartisan manners.

"Given Bush's record with the truth, this bipartisanship sounds like a bad idea on its face," Ivins continued, in a column that warned any Democrat who might think to make nice with President and his team that "These people are not only dishonest--they're not even smart."


RIP
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snood
 
  1  
Reply Thu 1 Feb, 2007 03:21 am
She was definitely a badass, and I loved her writing and spirit so.
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snood
 
  1  
Reply Thu 1 Feb, 2007 03:31 am
Look at what the oh-so-moral rightists are saying...

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
here's just a few comments, presumably left by the well-mannered and gracious conservatives, found on the message board at msnbc's piece on molly:


i'm glad she is dead. that "thing" did nothing but spew the same old worn out left wing slogans.

the world is now a better place. oh when will cancer take care of hillary?!?!

a sad case -- she couldn't help being ugly and stupid, but she could have kept her mouth shut and her fingers off the keyboard. good riddance.
all that liberal anger and rage against those not like her neocommunist self decayed molly from the inside out. hate kills.

you see molly, when you are so full of hate, the cheap way you attacked the president, no wonder you got cancer. the world is a better place without this vile witch!
sorry that she died of cancer, but i'd have to make the observation that there is now one less whining, bleating liberal.


And Tom at TBogg quotes this from Dean Esmay:
Molly Ivins has died at age 62 of that horrible beast known as cancer.
It's hard for me to know what to say about this. It's like finding out that Ann Coulter or Maureen Dowd have died. I can't quite think of what exactly I should say.

I always liked her Texas attitude--I am a fellow Texan after all--and I tend to like ballsy women. Even if they are faux-liberals like Molly.

It's hard to think of any major political commentator of the last few decades who's been more shallow and spiteful, except maybe Michael Savage or Paul Krugman.

. . .So I guess I'll just say:

Go with God, Molly.

-----------------------------------------------------------------

Sorry to bring this negative stuff here, but I saw Molly Ivins as a brave and thoughtful soldier in the war between left and right, and also someone who was necessary in a world where people who celebrate her death from cancer call themselves moral.
0 Replies
 
Joe Nation
 
  1  
Reply Thu 1 Feb, 2007 05:48 am
Sorry??

Why would you post such ill will on this thread?

Joe(have you no sense of common respect?)Nation
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Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 1 Feb, 2007 05:52 am
Sorry to hear that Molly is gone. She was a truly gifted writer. She'll be missed.
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Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Thu 1 Feb, 2007 06:44 am
Our world is smaller now--and charlatans are safer.
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farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 1 Feb, 2007 07:07 am
I always had her books on tape (or CD, as the ages progressed) , I could hear her voice becoming more and mnore gravelly , which only added to her own self amusement at the icons that needed smashing real good.
I loved her recounting of all the regs and (Lack therefof) that were neatly overturned by the Texas legislature after little Georgie went off to
"Do to the country what hed been doin to Texaz fer 8 years" (I think she originated that line)


I think we should post some Molly Ivins moments just to wrankle the Right side .
Did Ann Couklter ever come up against Molly?
0 Replies
 
Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Thu 1 Feb, 2007 09:18 am
http://static.firedoglake.com/2007/01/molly-ivins.jpg


A gorgeous photo of Molly...
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BumbleBeeBoogie
 
  1  
Reply Thu 1 Feb, 2007 10:02 am
Minneapolis pig named for Molly
Molly Ivins, 1944-2007
By , Texas Observer
Posted on January 31, 2007, Printed on February 1, 2007
http://www.alternet.org/story/47484/

Syndicated political columnist Molly Ivins died of breast cancer Wednesday evening at her home in Austin. She was 62 years old, and had much, much more to give this world. She remained cheerful despite Texas politics. She emphasized the more hilarious aspects of both state and national government, and consequently never had to write fiction. She said, "Good thing we've still got politics -- finest form of free entertainment ever invented."

Although short, Molly's life was writ large. She was as eloquent a speaker and teacher as she was a writer, and her quips will last at least as long as Will Rogers'. She dubbed George W. Bush "Shrub" and Texas Governor Rick Perry "Good Hair."

Molly always said in her official résumé that the two honors she valued the most were (1) when the Minneapolis Police Department named their mascot pig after her (she was covering the police beat at the time); and (2) when she was banned from speaking on the Texas A&M University campus at least once during her years as co-editor of The Texas Observer (1970-76). However, she said with great sincerity that she would be proudest of all to die sober, and she did.

She worked as a reporter for The New York Times (1976-82) in New York and Albany and later as Rocky Mountain Bureau Chief covering nine mountain states by herself. After working for the staid Times where she was heavily edited, Molly cut loose and became a columnist for the Dallas Times Herald.

When the Herald folded, she signed on as a columnist for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. In 2001, she became syndicated, eventually appearing in 400 newspapers. She never lost her love for The Texas Observer or her conviction that a free society relies on public-interest journalism. She found that brand of journalism the most fun. In recent years she shamelessly used her national and international contacts to raise funds for the Observer, which has always survived on a shoestring. More than $400,000 was contributed to the feisty little journal at a roast honoring Molly in Austin October 8. Molly's enduring message is, "Raise more hell."

Her full list of books and awards will be abbreviated here. In addition to compilations of her brilliant, hilarious liberal columns, she wrote with Lou Dubose, Shrub: The Short But Happy Political Life of George W. Bush (Random House 2000) and Bushwhacked: Life in George W. Bush's America (Random House 2003). She was working on a Random House book documenting the Bush administration's assault on the Bill of Rights when she died.

Molly, being practical, used many of her most prestigious awards as trivets while serving exquisite French dishes at her dinner parties. Her awards include the William Allen White Award from the University of Kansas, the Eugene V. Debs award in the field of journalism, many awards for advocacy of the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution and the David Nyhan Prize from the Shorenstein Center at the Kennedy School at Harvard.

Molly had a large family, many namesakes, hundreds of close friends, thousands of colleagues and hundreds of thousands of readers. She and her two siblings, Sara (Ivins) Maley of Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Andy Ivins of London, Texas, grew up in Houston. Her father, James Ivins, was a corporate lawyer and a Republican, which meant she always had someone to disagree with over the dinner table. Her mother, Margot, was a homemaker with a B.A. in psychology from Smith College. In addition to her brother and sister, Molly is survived by sister-in-law Carla Ivins, nephew Drew and niece Darby; niece Margot Hutchison and her husband, Neil, and their children Sam, Andy and Charlie of San Diego, Calif. and nephew Paul Maley and his wife, Karianna, and their children Marty, Anneli and Finnbar of Eltham, Victoria, Australia. Molly followed her mother to Smith and received a B.A. in 1966, followed by an M.A. from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and an honorary doctorate from Haverford College.


Statement from The Texas Observer

Molly Ivins left her editor's chair at The Texas Observer more than 30 years ago and went on to play a larger stage. But she never left us behind. She remained convinced that Texas needed a progressive, independent voice to call the powerful to account and to stand up for the common folk.

She kept our voice alive. More than once, when the paper was on the brink of insolvency, she delivered speeches and gave us the honorariums. She donated royalties from her best-selling book Shrub to keep the doors open. Her determination and efforts sustained the Observer as a magazine, as a family, and as a community.

Molly was a hero. She was a mentor. She was a liberal. She was a patriot. She was a friend. And she always will be. With Molly's death we have lost someone we hold dear. What she has left behind we will hold dearer still.

Despite her failing health, and an impending ice storm, Molly insisted on being driven to the Observer's most recent public event in early January so she could thank our supporters. Observer writers are useful, she explained to the crowd, in much the same way as good hunting dogs. Turn them loose, let them hunt. When they return with their prey, pat them on the head, say a few words of praise, and set them loose to hunt again.

For the time being, The Texas Observer's web site will be dedicated to remembering Molly, her work, her wit, her contributions to the political discourse of a nation. We invite readers to submit their own thoughts and recollections, to say a few words of praise. Then, we will return to the hunt.

To read more about Molly Ivins or to make a comment about her, go to Texas Observer. Tax-deductible contributions in her honor may be made to The Texas Observer, 307 West Seventh Street, Austin, TX 78701 or the American Civil Liberties Union, 127 Broad Street, 18th floor, New York, NY 10004.

Memorial services will be announced in the coming days.
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