47
   

Ask the A2K cooks!

 
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sat 28 Jan, 2012 05:44 pm
@ehBeth,
Leg/s, breast/s, wings, separately, ehBeth.
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sat 28 Jan, 2012 05:49 pm
@ossobuco,
Quote:
Some of us wonder why you would cook a turkey, it's a famously dry and relatively boring bird.

It's just that I haven't cooked it much at all before, osso.
The de-boned & stuffed roast I mentioned earlier was fine, but I was wondering about other possibilities, with other cuts.

I doubt I'd ever cook a whole one, even a small one ....
Way too much for a one person household. Smile
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Sat 28 Jan, 2012 05:51 pm
@msolga,
I think I'd season and grill wings - and then use them for the base for a really solid turkey/veggie/rice soup.

Turkey breast I'd bake over a bed of stuffing - with regular basting - and under a foil tent (or in a clay pot). I'd happily roast the turkey breast just to get the meat to make a turkey/tomato/bacon/mayo stacked sandwich.

Turkey leg. Definitely something to mull over. I've baked them and pulled off the meat to use in a dressing. The bones were re-roasted after the meat was picked off and then used to make broth.

If I ever saw turkey legs sold independently, I'd probably roast them and just chow down on them. I'm a big fan of turkey. I really like the flavour of the dark meat.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 28 Jan, 2012 05:55 pm
@ehBeth,
I get the sandwich, happy memories from when I was three in Dayton, Ohio, and what I do with turkey to this day.
Turkey soup, I'd rather most any other soup.
msolga
 
  2  
Reply Sat 28 Jan, 2012 05:57 pm
@ossobuco,
I can see you're not an enthusiast, osso. Wink
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sat 28 Jan, 2012 06:04 pm
@ehBeth,
Thank you, ehBeth!
A lot to consider there.
Quote:
I think I'd season and grill wings - and then use them for the base for a really solid turkey/veggie/rice soup.

Soup, in winter. That sounds good! Big soup fan here. Love rice, too!
Clay pot ... I like that idea & don't use it nearly often enough.
I was also thinking .... slow cooked?
Because of the toughness of the meat.
I'll do a bit more exploring in that area, I think.

Quote:
If I ever saw turkey legs sold independently...

You have to buy the whole turkey where you live?
That's a lotta turkey! Smile
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Sat 28 Jan, 2012 06:11 pm
@msolga,
Turkey is not a particularly tough meat (or shouldn't be if it's cooked properly). Sealpoet prepared a wonderful deep-fried turkey when we visited years ago. No slow-cooking involved there.

It is unusual to see turkey in parts here. I'd never seen it sold in parts until a trip to Germany years ago. I thought it was quite odd to order a turkey breast from the butcher.

Smoked turkey legs have become more common with growth of the Caribbean community - those are eaten as snacks, and used as soup started much as some Americans use ham hocks (something I learned about recently).

Maybe because those of us who like turkey seem to really like it, buying a whole turkey doesn't seem odd. I could happily eat turkey sandwiches 3 times a day for a week (and the turkey would be long gone before then).
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 28 Jan, 2012 06:13 pm
@msolga,
Just ask Calamity Jane...

I've been through forty years, off and on, of dry turkeys, cooked by others. I did like the one butterflyed one I cooked.
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sat 28 Jan, 2012 06:19 pm
@ossobuco,
Well we'll see if Jane turns up here, with any extra advice.
She's a great cook, I agree.
I've found ehBeth's suggestions very helpful.
You gotta remember I'm (almost) a complete novice at this turkey thing, osso. Smile
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sat 28 Jan, 2012 06:41 pm
@ehBeth,
Quote:
Maybe because those of us who like turkey seem to really like it, buying a whole turkey doesn't seem odd. I could happily eat turkey sandwiches 3 times a day for a week (and the turkey would be long gone before then).

Now there's a real fan for you! Smile
Quote:
It is unusual to see turkey in parts here.

I'm pretty sure that it hasn't been a big, established feature of Oz cooking. That could explain it.
There is not nearly as much available .... apart from at Christmas, but even then, nowhere near as much turkey as chicken.
But then, unlike in the US (I gather from previous discussions here) we tend to have more smaller portions of bigger items of food available for sale here .... like pumpkin, for example. I would very rarely, if ever, buy a whole large pumpkin. But I guess folk with big families would.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 28 Jan, 2012 06:43 pm
@msolga,
Call me in another ten years..
msolga
 
  2  
Reply Sat 28 Jan, 2012 06:46 pm
@ossobuco,
Confused

I haven't offended you somehow, have I, osso?
ossobuco
 
  0  
Reply Sat 28 Jan, 2012 06:49 pm
@msolga,
No, not at all - my kidding can be sharp.

msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sat 28 Jan, 2012 06:52 pm
@ossobuco,
Oh, OK! Smile
farmerman
 
  4  
Reply Sun 29 Jan, 2012 07:46 am
@msolga,
Ive often chided osso cause she doesnt really realize that she can sound really snotty sometimes when she probably doesnt intend to.
When we communicate on line I think we need to read what we just wrote and see whether we really mean what weve just said, because it can be interpretetd many ways that the writer is often unable to discern.

Ats just my story and Im stickin to it.
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sun 29 Jan, 2012 07:55 am
@farmerman,
OK then, farmer.
Thanks for that.
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Mon 30 Jan, 2012 07:21 pm
@msolga,
I used to have a good simple enchilada sauce recipe. I think I got it from an old checkered betty crocker. cain't find it...

any one have a good one?
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Mon 30 Jan, 2012 07:25 pm
@Rockhead,
http://www.bettycrocker.com/recipes/enchilada-sauce/1debdc2b-54a8-4f8d-8c59-256ebab67ff4

does this look familiar?

2 tablespoon vegetable oil

2 tablespoon flour

1/4 cup red chili powder, mild

2 cup beef broth

2 cup tomato sauce

1/2 teaspoon oregano (preferably mexican)

1/4 teaspoon cumin

1/2 teaspoon garlic (granulated)

1/2 teaspoon salt (or to taste)


Heat oil in large saucepan. Add the flour and blend with whisk. Cook, while mixing over medium heat for 2 minutes until golden brown in color. This creates the roux.

Add the remaining ingredients. Simmer on low for 15 minutes.


Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Mon 30 Jan, 2012 07:31 pm
@ehBeth,
yes and no...

ixnay on the ourflay.

and there was no oil.

and used water for the broth.

but the spices are right.

it called for half a bell pepper, too.

I can probably wing it from there...

thanx
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Mon 30 Jan, 2012 07:37 pm
@Rockhead,
(no ixnay and no earl Very Happy )

http://amandascookin.com/2009/06/homemade-enchilada-sauce.html

Homemade Enchilada Sauce
adapted from Betty Crocker’s Cookbook
1 15-oz can tomato sauce
1 4-oz can chopped green chilies (do not drain)
2/3 cup water
1/3 cup red bell pepper, chopped
1 tbsp chili powder
1/2 tsp ground cumin
1/2 tsp dried oregano
1 clove garlic minced
Place all ingredients into a blender and blend until smooth. Pour into a small saucepan and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer, uncovered for 5-7 minutes.
 

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