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Look Ma, I'm eating my oatmeal!

 
 
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Jan, 2007 08:05 pm
from wikipedia

The Lion and the Bee

The company is renowned for its refined sugar cane products, and especially for "Lyle's Golden Syrup", its brand of partially inverted refiners syrup. The Lyle's Golden Syrup trademark (also used on other products) depicts a lion and a swarm of bees, as well as a quotation from the Bible. In Book of Judges, Chapter 14, Samson was travelling to the land of the Philistines in search of a wife. During the journey he killed a lion, and on his return past the same spot he noticed that a swarm of bees had formed a comb of honey in the carcass. Samson later turned this into a riddle at a wedding: "Out of the eater came forth meat and out of the strong came forth sweetness". While no one is sure why this quotation was chosen, Abraham Lyle was a deeply religious man and it has been suggested that it refers either to the strength of the Lyle company which delivers the sweet syrup or possibly even to the trademark tins in which Golden Syrup is sold. According to a news report, the Guinness Book of Records has carried out extensive research and concluded that the design of the tins, packaging which has remained almost unchanged since 1885, forms Britain's oldest brand.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Jan, 2007 08:07 pm
Now you tell me.

It might have been the cranberries, nuts, and raisins that made it awfuller.
Though I make near the same as a nut bread and like it. But that is with reg unbleached flour.

I've liked a roasted wheat breakfast item before. We'll see.
0 Replies
 
Tai Chi
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Jan, 2007 08:09 pm
I think I want one of those tins.
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Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Jan, 2007 04:28 am
ehBeth wrote:
cut looks different from steamed/rolled

texture's waaaay different

[political thread mode] Well, ehBeth, I can see how some might consider the texture as different enough to be noticeable in a double-blind test. I'll just keep an open mind about what you said, as opposed to others, whose mind is made up about this matter.[/political thread mode]

Thanks!
0 Replies
 
Chai
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Jan, 2007 07:12 am
eating some right now.

Very, very good.

Great texture, very tasty.

Much better than rolled oats, and no blind taste test needed.
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Jan, 2007 07:22 am
I didn't make it by the store yesterday after all. I'll try today.

Now I'm hungry for something I've never had!

Thanks for the review, Chai.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Jan, 2007 11:39 am
Thanks for the review, Chai.


Thomas, are you ready to order some? It's great stuff if someone were, say, considering re-entering the weight-loss wars Cool .
0 Replies
 
hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Jan, 2007 12:02 pm
my mother would always boil up two pots of oatmeal :
one for my dad , oats boiled in water - but left fairly gritty . he'd eat it with salt und butter on top - certainly nothing sweet , such as syrup ;
for us boys , the oatmeal would be boiled much longer to make it 'mushy' ; we'd eat it with milk or cream and brown sugar .
nowadays i use the instant kind - it's ok for occasional consumption .
hbg
0 Replies
 
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Jan, 2007 02:31 pm
ehBeth wrote:
Thomas, are you ready to order some?

Sure! Do you have any idea what the German name for it would be? To my knowledge there is only one kind of "Haferflocken", and what you showed me definitely aren't "Flocken".
0 Replies
 
ginguh
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Jan, 2007 12:38 am
wow, it's been a while since i've had steel cut oats. they're really really good tho, as far as i can remember. nuttier.

i've never much cared for oatmeal, except with lots of pecans/walnuts, and berries. but now i don't really have much choice, and have to eat my oats.

i wish i had steel cut
0 Replies
 
yetiman
 
  2  
Reply Tue 16 Jan, 2007 03:25 pm
An alternate way to cook Steel Cut Oats
I have been a recent convert to McCanns after I bought a Zojirushi rice cooker in November. I started reading about people making Steel Cut Oats in rice cookers that have a porridge mode and decided to try it.

In the Zoji (Zutto model) I use 1 cup of McCanns to 2.5 cups of water in the porridge mode, and 40 min later I have a delicious meal. It comes out even better than cooking it on the stove top.

The Zutto has a mode where you enter the time you want the rice (or oatmeal) to be done, and it starts itself so it will be finished at that time.
I work third shift, so before I go to work at night i put the oats and water in and I come home to fresh hot oatmeal.

The McCanns is seriously good stuff, with a nutty flavor, it sort of pops when you bite into it... Mmmmmmm Laughing
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Jan, 2007 03:50 pm
yetiman - that's a great description of the flavour and *pop* of McCann's ... Welcome to A2K!

~~~~~

I guess I'll have to pack some McCann's when E and I travel to Vienna.
0 Replies
 
Sturgis
 
  2  
Reply Tue 16 Jan, 2007 04:22 pm
Oatmeal? Did someone mention oatmeal?
I have experienced several sorts of oatmeal and go back and forth between the Quaker (supposedly) old fashioned and McCann's slooooooooooooow cooking steel cut. For the record, Quaker also has a steel cut http://www.quakeroatmeal.com/qo_ourProducts/images/productShots/oatsSteelCut.jpg
(if it was mentioned earlier, I apologize for repetition)

I do not eat the quickie oats where dumping boiling water (or warm tap water) 'cooks' them. I find their consistency similar to that of paste.

What I like about steel cut (as opposed to rolled) is the texture and the flavor. Being a snobbish sort, I insist on soaking them for an hour or so in heavy cream (half and half will do well too). The unfortunate part is that they require more attention and time for cooking. I was introduced to McCann's by my grandmother originally, she would prepare them for a homebound friend of hers and then dash out the door to bring them to her. One day I got curious and sampled them. I liked them.

My love of Quaker old fashioned (the 5 minute cooking) is their ease of preparation and if I want them mushier, I just add more cooking time and if I want them firmer I cook them less and eat them more swiftly...the moisture makes them go soft after a time). The old fashioned also work well with my additives: either raisins or cinnamon or freshly diced apple or apple and cinnamon. For these, instead of cream, I cook them in a mixture of milk and water (2 parts milk for 1 part water).
0 Replies
 
hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Jan, 2007 05:26 pm
and remember , if your cholestorol is on the high side , putting some oat bran in to your daily diet is an easy way to reduce the cholestorol level .
it's cheaper and easier on your body than medication ,
and you might even live longer Shocked .
hbg

...OATBRAN REDUCES CHOLESTOROL...
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Jan, 2007 06:35 pm
I finally cooked some up this morning and, to be perfectly honest, I couldn't tell much difference. They were a little chewier (something Mr. B really didn't like) but I thought the flavor was almost identical to my regular oatmeal - Quaker old fashioned.

I'll have a hard time justifying the price or the long preparation in the future. There are only tiny differences in their nutritional value. And I eat them because I like them with the health aspect not weighing into the decision much.

I'm not really much of a "foodie" so it could just be my uneducated palate but I was expecting something very different and it just wasn't.

Maybe I'll try that cooking them in cream though... yummmy.
0 Replies
 
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Jan, 2007 06:42 pm
That's what I said already, there is - if at all - a minimal difference
in taste. It sure does not justify the price difference, and my taste
palates are quite sensitive to food.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Jan, 2007 06:52 pm
Ive had a DArk Toasted oatmeal at the Algonquin Inn in New Brunswick And the taste was waaay more nutty and deep flavored than Quaker or the Mcanna. Im wondering whether this wasnt an After market prep, where the chef stuck a pile of the oat groats into a roaster (like sesame seeds) and toasted them and then cooked em. Once youve had em this way , youll never go back.

When I was a wee lad, I lived with relatives and one cousin's mom used to make a Ralston SOmething. I recall that this had a malty flavor and Ive been looking for it all my life.
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Jan, 2007 06:54 pm
Next time I will believe you without question!

It was an interesting experiment anyhow.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Jan, 2007 07:13 pm
Ralston purina?
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Jan, 2007 07:19 pm
There is a cereal called "Ralston" - we used to eat it all the time when we were kids. I don't remember it being malty though. Malt-o-Meal was malty and delicious!

http://www.hotralston.com/cerealbox.gif
0 Replies
 
 

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