2
   

Look Ma, I'm eating my oatmeal!

 
 
patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Jan, 2007 08:42 am
Old fashioned.

Nothing fancy, t'be sure.

If I'm not in a hurry, I'll soak them in hot tap water for a few minutes first, then nuke 'em, but most of the time I just pop 'em right in. Haven't had them blow up yet.

I did space out and put the raisins in before it went into the microwave. Don't microwave raisins, is what I learned from that.
0 Replies
 
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Jan, 2007 08:46 am
Do you have any like corningware with lids, boomer?

That's how I make oatmeal. Put it in glass corningware bowl, put the lid on it, it boils like crazy but the lid keeps it in.
0 Replies
 
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Jan, 2007 09:03 am
ehBeth wrote:
Irish.

McCann's.

Texture and taste.

If you really love oatmeal, you'll notice and likely appreciate the difference.

I'd love to double-blind-test you on this. As a rule, rarely broken, to always go for the generic stuff. My impression is that placebo effects have more to do with the perception of taste than anything else, and that I'm not getting my money's worth from the "anything else".
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Jan, 2007 09:30 am
I've tasted both Quaker regular and the Irish steel cut, hate 'em both. Slime city. My distaste for oatmeal is one of my childhood food hates that I haven't outgrown. Well, I suppose there is still time...
0 Replies
 
InfraBlue
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Jan, 2007 02:54 pm
Quote:
Rolled oats are flake oats that have been steamed, rolled, re-steamed and toasted. Due to all of this additional processing they have lost some of their natural taste, goodness and texture.


I had always thought that "rolled oats" involved the least amount of processing.
0 Replies
 
Chai
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Jan, 2007 03:05 pm
InfraBlue wrote:
Quote:
Rolled oats are flake oats that have been steamed, rolled, re-steamed and toasted. Due to all of this additional processing they have lost some of their natural taste, goodness and texture.


I had always thought that "rolled oats" involved the least amount of processing.


I read something about that once.

The rolling involved being pressed down flat, so it'll cook more quickly. However, that pressing breaks down the whole oat. The steaming would remove some nutriants, as well as the heat from toasting.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Jan, 2007 03:12 pm
Thomas wrote:
As a rule, rarely broken, to always go for the generic stuff. My impression is that placebo effects have more to do with the perception of taste than anything else, and that I'm not getting my money's worth from the "anything else".


If you can find generic steel-cut oatmeal, have at it. I haven't ever been able to find any.

Generic rolled oats I can find, and I don't think they're any better/worse than Quaker rolled oats - which means I'd buy the generic instead of the Quaker.

However, this is about a difference in processing.

In your example of "placebo", it'd be like saying someone wouldn't notice the difference between boiled peanuts and candied almonds. They're not the same product.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Jan, 2007 03:14 pm
ossobuco wrote:
I've tasted both Quaker regular and the Irish steel cut, hate 'em both.


Do you cook or bake with oats at all, ossoB? What do you use for that? Instant/quick/regular rolled? If you would use instant for your baking, then none of this would make any difference to you.
0 Replies
 
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Jan, 2007 03:34 pm
ehBeth wrote:
In your example of "placebo", it'd be like saying someone wouldn't notice the difference between boiled peanuts and candied almonds. They're not the same product.

In this case, I don't understand what it means for oatmeal to be steel-cut. Can you show me the dfference in how the stuff looks?
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Jan, 2007 04:04 pm
start here
ehBeth wrote:
Here ya go Gus.

http://www.mccanns.ie/pages/products.html

Quote:
The oat groat is cut to enhance the flavour of the Irish Oat. The distinctive hearty, chewy texture of steel cuts makes them a favourite.


http://www.mccanns.ie/pages/products1.html

Quote:
Why Steel-cut Oats?

Steel-Cut Oats are whole grain groats (the inner portion of the oat kernel) which have been cut into two or three pieces using steel discs. Golden in colour and resembling mini rice particles, they are as nature intended - nothing added and nothing taken out.

How are they different from Rolled Oats?

Rolled oats are flake oats that have been steamed, rolled, re-steamed and toasted. Due to all of this additional processing they have lost some of their natural taste, goodness and texture.

What makes McCann's Steel-cut Oats so special?

<snip> The quality of Irish Oats and the distinctive crunchy texture make McCann's Steel-Cuts a gourmet delight.


then compare

http://www.foodsubs.com/Photos/steelcutoats2.jpg

with

http://www.all-creatures.org/recipes/images/i-oats-rolled.jpg


cut looks different from steamed/rolled

texture's waaaay different
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Jan, 2007 04:16 pm
Do they substitute equally for baking, eBeth?
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Jan, 2007 04:19 pm
I have baked with oats sometimes. Hmmmm, not since my married days when my hub used the McCann's steel cut for breakfast... prior to discovering those, I used regular oats for cookies.
I can tell the difference, just don't like either of them as a cereal.
Hey, I threw out a box of cracked wheat cereal just this week. Tooooooo intense a flavor for me.

Signed,
Ms. Picky



Actually, I might have lied. I think I used the steel cut in bread and liked them.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Jan, 2007 05:48 pm
Boomer - I use it even-even for baking, but I'm a crunchy texture fan.
0 Replies
 
Chai
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Jan, 2007 07:09 pm
Hey boomer,

I bought a box of McCanns on my way home.

To cook it from scratch takes 30 MINUTES!!! Shocked

But, it tell you to bring the water to a boil the night before, put in the oats and turn off the heat, and just let them sit overnight. (don't forget the salt)

Then, in the morning, just simmer for 9-12 minutes.

Thomas, they definately look different. they are little chucks of oat, not pressed flat.

I'll report back later.

Thanks ehbeth.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Jan, 2007 07:23 pm
Hi Chai!

I'll be really interested to hear/read what you think of the texture of the steel-cut oats. Even in oatmeal they seem to have a more mmmmm separateness to me.

I've just been reading a lot (why? Cool ) about the health benefits of oats, so I may need to make a few batches of muffins or breads.
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Jan, 2007 07:35 pm
boomerang wrote:
What is golden syrup?


Golden syrup is a thick, amber-colored form of inverted sugar syrup, made in the process of refining sugar cane juice into sugar, It is used in a variety of baking recipes and desserts. It has an appearance and taste similar to honey, and is often used as a substitute for people who cannot eat honey and those who choose not to (such as vegans). It can also be used as a substitute for corn syrup.

wikipedia

Taste Is NOT similar to honey

http://www.csrsugar.com.au/Shared/Images/Products/GoldenSyrupSqueeze500g.jpg

http://www.cornwallcakes.co.uk/pouring%20golden%20syrup%20website%20.JPG
0 Replies
 
Tai Chi
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Jan, 2007 07:43 pm
Hey Crockpot fans!

You can also cook steel cut oatmeal overnight in your crockpot. In fact steel cut holds up better than rolled (due to the long cooking time, I guess). Just remember to oil/butter/spray your crockpot before adding water and oats. Breakfast is ready when you are in the morning.
0 Replies
 
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Jan, 2007 07:55 pm
http://www.impermanencia.net/tequedasacenar/wp-content/Goldensyrup.jpg

the best of the best, imo
0 Replies
 
Tai Chi
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Jan, 2007 07:58 pm
Help me out with the quote, djjd; something like:

"Out of strength comes forth sweetness"

Is that close?
0 Replies
 
Swimpy
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Jan, 2007 08:03 pm
ossobuco wrote:
I have baked with oats sometimes. Hmmmm, not since my married days when my hub used the McCann's steel cut for breakfast... prior to discovering those, I used regular oats for cookies.
I can tell the difference, just don't like either of them as a cereal.
Hey, I threw out a box of cracked wheat cereal just this week. Tooooooo intense a flavor for me.

Signed,
Ms. Picky



Actually, I might have lied. I think I used the steel cut in bread and liked them.


I make a great bread with cracked wheat Ms. Picky.
0 Replies
 
 

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