Reply Mon 23 Jun, 2003 11:41 am
The grammar of the quote below seems beyond my grasp, would you like to explain it to me?

(Question: whose hand?)
Quote:
`O God!' I screamed, and `O God!' again and again; for there before my eyes - pale and shaken, and half fainting, and groping before him with his hands, like a man restored from death - there stood Henry Jekyll!
(1) I think the quote is actually one sentence, because the punctuations of the sentence has proven this. So, the subject of the present participle "groping" is "I". But it is illogical that "I" grope with "his hands" (Should be with "my hands"?)
(2) If the "hands" is Henry Jekyll's, the clause should be "groping his hands before him"?
(3) I guess the problem is that I didn't know how to use "with". I have checked "with" items out in some dictionaries, but there seems no answer for me.
(4) If you discern that I have misunderstood the definition of the word "with" in the quote, please point out the concrete content of the definition.

Thanks in anticipation.

PS. The right context of the quote:

He put the glass to his lips, and drank at one gulp. A cry followed; he reeled, staggered, clutched at the table and held on, staring with infected eyes, gasping with open mouth; and as I looked, there came, I thought, a change - he seemed to swell - his face became suddenly black, and the features seemed to melt and alter - and the next moment I had sprung to my feet and leaped back against the wall, my arm raised to shield me from that prodigy, my mind submerged in terror.

`O God!' I screamed, and `O God!' again and again; for there before my eyes - pale and shaken, and half fainting, and groping before him with his hands, like a man restored from death - there stood Henry Jekyll!

What he told me in the next hour I cannot bring my mind to set on paper. I saw what I saw, I heard what I heard, and my soul sickened at it; and yet, now when that sight has faded from my eyes, I ask myself if I believe it, and I cannot answer. My life is shaken to its roots; sleep has left me; the deadliest terror sits by me at all hours of the day and night; I feel that my days are numbered, and that I must die; and yet I shall die incredulous. As for the moral turpitude that man unveiled to me, even with tears of penitence, I cannot, even in memory, dwell on it without a start of horror. I will say but one thing, Utterson, and that (if you can bring your mind to credit it) will be more than enough.
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Discussion • Score: 0 • Views: 1,454 • Replies: 6
No top replies

 
Wy
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jun, 2003 07:29 pm
OristarA,
The whole bit between the dashes is separate from the main sentence. Take it out and you get:
"O God!" I screamed, and "O God!" again and again; for there before my eyes(,) there stood Henry Jekyll! (comma mine)
There's your simple sentence -- the speaker is screaming at the sight of H.J.

The part between the dashes describes the appearance of Henry Jekyll: "pale and shaken, and half fainting, and groping before him with his hands, like a man restored from death." So it's Henry Jekyll doing the groping, with his own hands...

Dashes can be used this way, to indicate a parenthetical remark, that is, one which does not affect the basic structure or meaning of the sentence, but is included to give additional information to the reader.
0 Replies
 
nextone
 
  1  
Reply Tue 24 Jun, 2003 03:49 am
Hands definitely belong to H.J. "with his hands" is redundant.

To grope = to reach out for blindly, to feel manually, to seek. She groped for the light switch. Teens were making out, groping one another. He groped for the words to express his sorrow.
0 Replies
 
Wy
 
  1  
Reply Tue 24 Jun, 2003 03:16 pm
nextone, when you used the example "He groped for the words to express his sorrow," you showed why "with his hands" is notDr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde was written quite a while ago).
0 Replies
 
nextone
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Jul, 2003 07:14 pm
Paid by the word no doubt. Smile
0 Replies
 
Wy
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Jul, 2003 07:26 pm
Or, if by the letter, indubitably!
0 Replies
 
nextone
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Jul, 2003 07:39 pm
Every little byte counts.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

deal - Question by WBYeats
Drs. = female doctor? - Question by oristarA
Let pupils abandon spelling rules, says academic - Discussion by Robert Gentel
Please, I need help. - Question by imsak
Is this sentence grammatically correct? - Question by Sydney-Strock
"come from" - Question by mcook
 
  1. Forums
  2. » Whose hands?
Copyright © 2019 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.05 seconds on 10/20/2019 at 05:42:48