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Literally

 
 
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Tue 30 Mar, 2004 08:18 pm
The reasons for the tendency might come down to they are literally intelligent people. So tongue in cheek. Razz
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JoanneDorel
 
  1  
Reply Tue 30 Mar, 2004 08:38 pm
Very Happy
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ailsagirl
 
  1  
Reply Tue 30 Mar, 2004 09:16 pm
"Orientate"
Hi Jer,

Yes, "orientate" bothers me, as well as "cohabitate." This is like a dam bursting!! Or will be, once all those pesky words that people misuse come gushing forth. Right now, the best ones are eluding me (of course!.

Ailsa
0 Replies
 
Jer
 
  1  
Reply Tue 30 Mar, 2004 09:22 pm
What really bugs me about orientate is that it's now a word because of common misuse. It's kind of like saying "presentate" instead of "present" or "presentated" instead of "presented".
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ailsagirl
 
  1  
Reply Tue 30 Mar, 2004 10:24 pm
This is so true
Hi Jer,

So true! I find that February is always an irritating month because it seems that so many pronounce it "FEB-u-ary." As if there were only one "r" in the word! But little by little, it would seem that these objectionable words are finding their way into acceptable vocabulary.

What about the word "preventive?" My Webster's says it came into usage around 1639. It says the word "preventative" came into usage around 1654 and that the two words are synonymous. I wonder why "preventative" was even invented-- wasn't "preventive" enough? I'm sure there's an interesting story about it somewhere.

Now for something I like: I have read that it used to be the norm to pronounce the last syllable of a verb's past tense. Take the word "punished"-- it used to be pronounced "pun-ish-shed." No more, of course, but certain words ("beloved" is all I can think of offhand) are still pronounced with the final syllable. I like that because it provides a link between NOW and THEN and makes me think that it wasn't so long ago after all. And I like the fact that many of our words were spoken in Shakespeare's time-- some of them even invented by the Bard!! And these words have kept their meaning over the centuries. I hope it continues.

Ailsa
0 Replies
 
Jer
 
  1  
Reply Tue 30 Mar, 2004 10:28 pm
Good one on preventative - not one that I ever really use or think about so I hadn't entered it into the "orientate" category. Smile I have now.
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shepaints
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Oct, 2004 07:16 am
Jer....I think the British use "orientated "
and North Americans "oriented".....

I dislike seck a tree (secretary).
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