6
   

What is the big word which means excessive use of big words?

 
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Aug, 2006 07:12 pm
Timber, bless his heart, has great clarity. I never have to figure anything out about what he is saying. Spendi, on the other hand, wafts in fancy and slamdances words. I usually disagree with him, staring bemused with sometimes begrudging bits of delight.

Still, who are the quattro-syllabic here?
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Aug, 2006 07:14 pm
You might guess by now I am not of the coterie who want to symplify communication...

except on signage.
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Aug, 2006 07:16 pm
Maybe not slamdances, that's too ballistic. Ok, badmintons words.
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farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Aug, 2006 07:19 pm
I took my creative writing from Mark van Doren. He always said, never extend the length of the words you use unless you have a damn good reasomn, and sounding smart is not one of them.
His poetry was dense as chili but his prose was criso and cler. That why I always like Larry McMurtry's writing. He could make period prose sound alive and bitchin.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Aug, 2006 07:19 pm
aaaaaaaand, I suspect our thread poster is for simplifying.
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Aug, 2006 07:22 pm
I like him too, and I like other 'spare' writers. But I don't like only them.

Hmm, Harvey knew the van Dorens. 6 degrees of connection...
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farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Aug, 2006 07:35 pm
HE was pretty old but really sharp and quite wit. His knowledeg of Greek and Classical English writing was something to behold. He was on emeritus status at Columbia when I had him.

PS whats wrong with sesquipedalian or euphuistic? this question has quite a few answers methinks. Francis gets full credit as do I.
0 Replies
 
InfraBlue
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Aug, 2006 07:36 pm
I think Francis' is the better word, "sesquipedalian."
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Intrepid
 
  2  
Reply Sat 19 Aug, 2006 07:40 pm
But alas, apparently not what the author of the thread was look for Confused
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Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Aug, 2006 09:02 pm
I still like logorrhea -- a diarrhea of words. (Especially since you called it 'bullshit', Farmer. Smile)
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farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Aug, 2006 07:05 am
yes we must not forget MA. However , logorhea has always been used to describe symptomology of a mental condition where people just put together neologisms and nonsense words. ALSO my euphuistic(I went and actually looked it up after I posted) is derivative paen of a single authors style, one who was fond of creating "Fine" style writing for its own sense, but mostly unwarranted for good communication.
So, in recalculating grades MA and I get partial credit while Francis gets full credit.(along with theword that the author was looking for=bombastic. We must be aware that there are often many answers to a specific question)
0 Replies
 
spendius
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Aug, 2006 12:44 pm
cacoethesloquendi.

That's posher than logorhea.
0 Replies
 
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Aug, 2006 01:47 pm
spendius wrote:
cacoethesloquendi.

That's posher than logorhea.


I quite agree, Spendius.

(But I doubt I'll remember how to spell it.)
0 Replies
 
spendius
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Aug, 2006 05:03 pm
Andy-

How about-

Tractatustrailersephemerascatalogicus.
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farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Aug, 2006 05:45 pm
spendi is our resident tibialoconcupiscent who's also an accomplished verbigerationist
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Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Aug, 2006 07:59 pm
spendius wrote:
Andy-

How about-

Tractatustrailersephemerascatalogicus.


How about --

pneumonoultramiscroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis

It's got nothing to do with logorrhea or eupheusitic but I do love a 45-letter word.
0 Replies
 
Clary
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Aug, 2006 09:21 am
That's the official longest; but I like 'sesquipedalian' for a long word, literally 'lasting for one and a half feet' of verse metre.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Aug, 2006 09:29 am
Theres huuuge word that, because of its length looks almost Welsh. Its a word that means "A meal that is made up of leftovers rom meals that were made of leftovers from the previous two weeks" Its in the Grandiloquent Dictionary.com
0 Replies
 
Clary
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Aug, 2006 09:31 am
I don't believe it's a real genuine word, even though you joined A2K on my birthday, Mr Farmer
0 Replies
 
spendius
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Aug, 2006 11:12 am
Did it make your day Clary?
0 Replies
 
 

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