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Everything stops for tea

 
 
Reply Wed 5 Jul, 2006 05:41 am
Today's Guardian has a large report about 'English Afternoon Tea' on pages 44 - 47

http://i6.tinypic.com/1z22ecm.jpg
http://i6.tinypic.com/1z22ejd.jpg

The complete online version ...

Quote:
Everything stops for tea

All Simon Mills wanted was afternoon tea somewhere nice. But could he get a table? Not a chance - every cucumber sandwich was booked up weeks ahead. It turns out that teatime is booming. And it's no wonder, he says: in a world of fast frothy lattes to go, there's something deliciously languid and non-careerist about its elaborate rituals and treats

Wednesday July 5, 2006
The Guardian


To the Ritz, Piccadilly, London, to meet the comedian Joan Rivers. As Joanie is an enthusiastic and committed Anglophile (and not particularly big on gut-busting lunches) we have decided to take a light, but improving, afternoon tea in the Ritz's famous Palm Court. There is only one problem - it is fully booked. Even for a showbiz legend? Very sorry, says the hotel, but they just can't fit us in. They are absolutely chocker for weeks and weeks ahead.


... can be read HERE.

The print version, however, includes some nice recipes ... which I'll post here (later).
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Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 8,422 • Replies: 35
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satt fs
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Jul, 2006 05:54 am
tea/coffee (google trends)
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gustavratzenhofer
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Jul, 2006 05:58 am
I thought Walter would be in mourning over the German's collapse against the Italians, but here he is, discussing tea as if soccer was the last thing on his mind.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Jul, 2006 06:05 am
From the above pictured print version of today's The Guardian:

Quote:
Putting on the Ritz . . . how to do tea at home

The perfect cup of tea

http://img210.imageshack.us/img210/7510/guardian34vn.jpg

Michael Ktob

Use freshly drawn water and if the water is hard, use a filter to soften it. Boil the kettle and warm the pot thoroughly. Into the empty pot put one dessertspoonful of leaves per person plus half a dessertspoon for the pot (use a removable filter if possible). Bring the kettle to the boil again and fill the pot up. Steep the tea for two to three minutes. Use semi-skimmed or skimmed milk rather than full-fat. Pour the tea, filling the pot up afterwards with fresh boiling water. When the tea has brewed sufficiently, remove the filter so the tea doesn't stew. If using lemon instead of milk, put the lemon in before pouring the tea. Afterwards, rinse the teapot out thoroughly to prevent tannin build-up. Always keep the tea leaves in a dark airtight container, especially fragrant teas. Experiment with your own blends (my favourite is half assam to half earl grey). Use a good quality china cup and not some thumping great mug.
Michael Ktob is manager of the Palm Court at the Ritz


Continued
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Jul, 2006 06:06 am
Quote:
The perfect cucumber sandwich

http://img210.imageshack.us/img210/1206/guardian37ua.jpg

Simon Hopkinson

The finest bread to use for these sandwiches is, without question, the French bread known as pain de mie. It is a firm textured, almost creamy-tasting bread with the palest yellow, fine crumb. Poilâne bakery in Elizabeth Street, London SW1 (020-7808 4910) makes it in a rectangular tin, producing a perfect sandwich loaf which staff will happily slice for you as thinly as you like. The cucumber should be peeled (most important), sliced thinly and then lightly salted and left to leach out excess moisture. Pat dry in a tea towel. Lightly butter (unsalted) the bread, lay some overlapping slices of cucumber on it and then grind freshly milled white pepper on top. Sandwich together and press firmly. Slice off the crusts neatly and cut into three finger-sized sandwiches. If not eating them straight away, wrap in sheets of dampened greaseproof paper.
Simon Hopkinson is the author of Second Helpings of Roast Chicken


Continued
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Jul, 2006 06:11 am
Walter Hinteler wrote:
Quote:
The perfect cucumber sandwich

http://img210.imageshack.us/img210/1206/guardian37ua.jpg

Simon Hopkinson

The finest bread to use for these sandwiches is, without question, the French bread known as pain de mie. It is a firm textured, almost creamy-tasting bread with the palest yellow, fine crumb. Poilâne bakery in Elizabeth Street, London SW1 (020-7808 4910) makes it in a rectangular tin, producing a perfect sandwich loaf which staff will happily slice for you as thinly as you like. The cucumber should be peeled (most important), sliced thinly and then lightly salted and left to leach out excess moisture. Pat dry in a tea towel. Lightly butter (unsalted) the bread, lay some overlapping slices of cucumber on it and then grind freshly milled white pepper on top. Sandwich together and press firmly. Slice off the crusts neatly and cut into three finger-sized sandwiches. If not eating them straight away, wrap in sheets of dampened greaseproof paper.
Simon Hopkinson is the author of Second Helpings of Roast Chicken


Continued
0 Replies
 
Chai
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Jul, 2006 06:11 am
I don't bring my water to a boil, I think it makes the tea bitter.

I bring the water up to the point where there are bubbles on the side of the pot, and a couple of them start floating up.

I'll always make sure my cup is warmed before pouring the tea it.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Jul, 2006 06:12 am
Quote:

The perfect cake
Jane Asher
Sponge cakes, of course, are light and delicious, but sometimes I feel like a slice of old-fashioned madeira, which has that bit more body to it and says "tea-time" in a very English and satisfying way. Less fluffy than a sponge, it looks classically elegant, especially if topped with a drizzle of lemony icing and some beautiful crystallised violets and presented on a paper doily (making a comeback, so they tell me).


Lemon madeira cake 150g (5oz) butter 150g (5oz) castor sugar 4 medium eggs 200g (7oz) self-raising flour 1 tsp baking powder Rind and juice of an unwaxed lemon 225g (8oz) icing sugar


Pre-heat the oven to 180C (350F, gas mark 4). Cream the butter and sugar together until light and fluffy. Break the eggs into a bowl or large cup and beat lightly, before adding little by little to the butter/sugar mix, beating well after each addition (if you use a food mixer or processor keep it on a high speed and add the eggs while it's running). Sift the flour, baking powder and a pinch of salt together in a separate bowl, then stir it into the cake mix. Add the grated rind of the lemon and mix well. Grease and flour a six-inch-deep cake tin, spoon in the mixture and bake for 60-70 minutes until firm to the touch or until a knife inserted into the middle comes out clean. Let it cool for a couple of minutes, then turn out on to a wire rack and leave until completely cold. Squeeze the juice of the lemon into a small bowl or jug, making sure no pips go into it, then gradually add the sieved icing sugar, little by little, until you have a thick, pouring consistency. Pour the icing over the cold cake, starting in the centre and allowing it to drizzle over the sides. When almost set, add a few crystallised violets and place on a paper doily on a pretty plate.
Jane Asher's latest book is Cakes For Fun, www.jane-asher.co.uk

continued
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Jul, 2006 06:13 am
Quote:
The perfect fruit scone

By experts from Bettys cookery school Bettys tearoom, Harrogate

http://img210.imageshack.us/img210/8459/guardian35aw.jpg
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Jul, 2006 06:17 am
Sorry for the sandwiched responses, but I wanted to paste what I'd copied/typed from the printed one after the other and thus didn't notice your responses.

Besides, I forgot to post the illustration for the cake (and no chance to change my post :wink: )
http://img152.imageshack.us/img152/3845/guardian32vj.jpg
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Jul, 2006 08:27 am
Nice article... and I love the illustrations..
0 Replies
 
Chai
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Jul, 2006 08:30 am
I agree, the pictures are so comfy.
0 Replies
 
KingMile
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Jul, 2006 12:32 pm
tea brewing
Depending on the tea, for black tea and herbal tea you want to use boiling water at 212 degrees. For Green and White tea under boiling is preferred around 180 degrees. Make sure to steep for the right times too!! Enjoy!!

Mile
Edit [Moderator]: Link removed
0 Replies
 
Lord Ellpus
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Jul, 2006 12:57 pm
I can't stand tea. Absolutely hate the stuff. Apparently, I tried some as a kid and spat it out. Never drunk any since, and just the smell makes me want to heave.

Scones though, with jam and cream, are a totally different matter. As long as they are pronounced sconns, of course.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Jul, 2006 01:03 pm
Lord Ellpus wrote:
As long as they are pronounced sconns, of course.


What cream do you prefer on them? Buttered (like it should be) with salted or unsalted butter?

There are more questions about sconns than about tea!

Btw: did you hear, LE, that some tea rooms sell packed "scones" with a 'best before eating date' like 2010 or so? Shocked
0 Replies
 
Lord Ellpus
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Jul, 2006 01:07 pm
Scones will keep for donkey's years, in the right conditions, Walter. I think that was why they were invented in the first place. Christmas cake keeps well, also.

Clotted cream is best, with Tiptree "little scarlet" jam, made with whole alpine strawberries (those tiny weeny little ones).

Plus a squeezy thing of good, fresh, strong black coffee. Mmmmmm.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Jul, 2006 01:11 pm
Agree with the marmalade but not with the scones ... the are best warm out of the oven, butter and cream runinng down on the trousers - no, delete that - melting a bit, I meant.

Christmas cake must be eaten when found (like chocolate).
0 Replies
 
Lord Ellpus
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Jul, 2006 01:14 pm
Our christmas cake weighs in at four pounds per cubic inch, and contains at least a bottle of sherry, a shovel of mixed fruit and god knows what else!

Clotted cream in america....and a recipe for home made clotted cream..

http://www.devon-calling.com/food%20and%20drink/clotted-cream.htm
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Jul, 2006 01:16 pm
I could imagine, clotted cream isn't allowed in the USA like most good stuff, or you must be 21 or something like it.
0 Replies
 
Lord Ellpus
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Jul, 2006 01:22 pm
Ha! Don't you believe it. These Amie's know how to indulge themselves, methinks.
0 Replies
 
 

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