1
   

Everything stops for tea

 
 
Diane
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Jul, 2006 01:22 pm
So what kind of Christmas cake are you two talking about? Scones are heaven, but Christmas cake, at least here in the US, are lethal weapons--if they had been found in Iraq, they would have qualified for WMD's.
They have gobs of icky citron, soaked in bourbon for a couple of months (which, under different circumstances would be wondeful) and weigh more that a horse. If I were soaked in bourbon for a couple of months, I would be more tolerant of Christmas cakes.

It's easy to imagine garbage dumps all over the US with layer upon layer of fossilized Chrismas cakes which were thrown out immediately upon receiving. They should really be put on the compost pile.

Rant over. Thank you Walter for the lovely article and the recipes.

Have some more madeira, my darling.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Jul, 2006 01:25 pm
No alcohol - thanks. [Though I try sometimes a little bit of Tiptree's christmas marmelade ...]
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Lord Ellpus
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Jul, 2006 01:25 pm
That's the type, Diane. Give one small piece to the aged aunt at Christmas, and she's making loud trouser noises until the end of February.
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Lord Ellpus
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Jul, 2006 01:28 pm
Mmmmm. Tiptree, possibly the best jam in the world.

http://www.tiptree.com/frame.html
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Chai
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Jul, 2006 01:39 pm
Lord Ellpus wrote:
I can't stand tea. Absolutely hate the stuff. Apparently, I tried some as a kid and spat it out. Never drunk any since, and just the smell makes me want to heave.





You......you don't like tea?....(sniff)......that's......ok....(sniff)
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Jul, 2006 01:41 pm
Lord Ellpus wrote:
Mmmmm. Tiptree, possibly the best jam in the world.


Essex! [I stopped eating Original Dundee Marmalade when I noticed it was produced in ... Manchester!]
0 Replies
 
Lord Ellpus
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Jul, 2006 01:41 pm
Chai, Um...er...I meant to say......

<stop digging, Ellpus>

Er...um....
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Chai
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Jul, 2006 01:44 pm
no, no...perfectly all right.....(sniff).....

it....it just came as such a shock....(sniff).....and all.
0 Replies
 
Lord Ellpus
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Jul, 2006 01:52 pm
Walter Hinteler wrote:
Lord Ellpus wrote:
Mmmmm. Tiptree, possibly the best jam in the world.


Essex! [I stopped eating Original Dundee Marmalade when I noticed it was produced in ... Manchester!]


I hope you're not being disparaging about Mancs, Walter, my Nan came from there and if she was anything to go by, the women from Manchester are quite something.
They may have only just got electricity, but I'm sure they make fine Marmalade.

We had a German exchange student stay with us once (87/88?) and he went mad about Tiptree jams, so much so that he took four jars home with him.
A month or so later, we received a letter from him (and his Mum) with English five pound notes inside, asking us to buy as much as the money would allow, and parcel it to him, as they wanted to give them away as presents to various members of their family.

You Germans are weird.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Jul, 2006 02:04 pm
When returning from Britain they always label my suitcase 'HEAVY' just because of the marmalade/jam.

(Though I must admit, I import from France even more.)
0 Replies
 
Lord Ellpus
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Jul, 2006 02:10 pm
French jams are a bit too runny for my liking, but one......ooh...one, made from Myrtilles.....heaven!
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Jul, 2006 02:19 pm
Lord Ellpus wrote:
French jams are a bit too runny for my liking, but one......ooh...one, made from Myrtilles.....heaven!


Last time I was there, in spring, the had a really nice young and beautiful girl promoting some new mixtures .... can't really remember what it was ... but we had some good talks. About jam/marmalade as well.
0 Replies
 
Diane
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Jul, 2006 02:25 pm
Myrtilles: I had to look it up--blueberries in the US. Loverly.
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Jul, 2006 02:36 pm
I prefer framboises, personally . . .
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Lord Ellpus
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Jul, 2006 02:54 pm
There's nothing like Myrtle on toast.
0 Replies
 
smorgs
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 Jul, 2006 09:05 am
Hark!!!

Did someone say Manchester?

Did someone say JAM?

The two are synonymous:

...I'm surpised at you ellpus, ya big southern softie, and YOU Walter!

FRENCH JAM!? Shocked

you need PROPER jam, and a proper recipe to put your proper jam in!



Robertsons Jams

The Story of Preserves

Fruit as been preserved in one way or another for centuries, and preserves (as their name implies) have their origins in the need to keep seasonal crops for consumption throughout the year. The first 'preserver' of fruit was Neolithic Man, who simply sliced and dried his fruit for storage. The Greeks developed preserves from this point. Quinces were peeled, pipped and wedged tightly in a container with honey. After a year, the quinces had softened and were known as 'wine honey' or Melomeli. It is from this that the Portuguese word for quince, Marmelo, was developed. And from that it was only a small step to marmelada which in Greece and Spain today, applies to the full range of preserves, from orange marmalade to apricot jam.


The History of Robertsons Jams

How It All Began

James Robertson's life was fated to be devoted to the making of the world's finest preserves, as the story of the birth of Robertson's (as we know it today) testifies. James' working life began in a thread mill, but because of the recession in the industry, he decided to cut his losses and took up an apprenticeship with a local grocer. The talent that was to make James his fortune, quickly surfaced and just three years later he made the brave decision to go it alone. Little did James know, on that day in 1859 as he stood outside his shop at 86 Causide Street in Paisley Scotlnd, what fate had in store for him. Despite being shrewd in business, James was a kind, charitable man and one day he took pity on a struggling salesman and agreed to buy a barrel of bitter oranges from him. James had known only too well that the oranges would not sell well, but what he did not realise was that his act of kindness would change his whole life. They say that behind every great man is a great woman and this could not have been more true than in the case of James Robertson and his wife Marion. Rather than see the offending oranges go to waste she hit upon the ideaq of making them into marmalade to be sold on the shop.


Marion's clear tangy 'Golden Shred' marmalade was an instant success. James was not slow to realise the full business potential that his wife had uncovered and set about perfecting her original recipe. It was then that the secret of the delicious Robertson's flavour was revealed. Somehow James had found a way to remove the bitterness of the orange whilst still retaining what he called "the highly tonic value of the fruit". It is the same secret which even today, gives all of Robertson's preserves their special flavour.


The success of James Robertson as a producer of the finet quality preserves was insured. During the remainder of the nineteenth century, business grew steadily and sales gradually extended from Scotland to the whole of Great Britain and beyond. James Robertsons and Sons Ltd opened its famous jam works in 1890 in Droylsden. At first, stone jars were used for the marmalade, but were eventually replaced by glass jars in the 1930's. The Robertson name was soon in demand for export by those who had tasted it on trips to Great Britain.




Manchester Pudding (Mrs Beeton)

(To eat Cold)
Very Good Puff Paste or Medium Puff Paste
285ml (½ pint) Milk
85g (3oz) Grated Bread
50g (2oz) Butter
1 Strip Lemon Peel
4 Yolks
2 Egg Whites
3 tbsp Brandy
Jam
Sugar, to taste

Flavour the milk with lemon peel, by infusing it in the milk for 30 minutes.
Strain it on to the breadcrumbs and boil for 2 or 3 minutes.
Add the eggs, butter, sugar and brandy, stir well.
Allow to cool.
Cover a pie dish with puff paste and put a thick layer of any kind of jam (as long as it's Robertsons of manchester) at the bottom.
Pour in the mixture.
Bake the pudding for an hour.
Serve cold, dusted with caster sugar.

Time: 1 hour.
Sufficient for 5 or 6 persons.
Seasonable at any time.

MANCHESTER PUDDING

(to eat Cold)

1300. INGREDIENTS - 3 oz. of grated bread, 1/2 pint of milk, a strip of lemon-peel, 4 eggs, 2 oz. of butter, sugar to taste, puff-paste, jam, 3 tablespoonfuls of brandy.

Mode - Flavour the milk with lemon-peel, by infusing it in the milk for 1/2 hour; then strain it on to the bread crumbs, and boil it for 2 or 3 minutes; add the eggs, leaving out the whites of 2, the butter, sugar, and brandy; stir all these ingredients well together; cover a pie-dish with puff-paste, and at the bottom put a thick layer of any kind of jam; pour the above mixture, cold, on the jam, and bake the pudding for an hour. Serve cold, with a little sifted sugar sprinkled over.

Time - 1 hour.

Average cost, 1s.

Sufficient for 5 or 6 persons.

Seasonable at any time.
0 Replies
 
 

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