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Mind the gap: UK found to be healthier than America

 
 
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 May, 2006 05:37 pm
Er, much better weather? Not if you live where I do! We do seem to be fretting over stuff more than you do (from what I can tell).
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Wolf ODonnell
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 May, 2006 05:40 pm
littlek wrote:
Er, much better weather? Not if you live where I do! We do seem to be fretting over stuff more than you do (from what I can tell).


I guess the worry about health insurance contributes to the stress, added to that Fox News with its constant message of "Terror Alert: Elevated" scrolling across its news ticker.
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Lord Ellpus
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 May, 2006 05:42 pm
Now, I DID think that you were in New York?

I always thought that you had a pretty severe winter, but could virtually guarantee a splendid summer, no?

Here, if we get three sunny days in a row, we think we've won the lottery.
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littlek
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 May, 2006 05:45 pm
I think health insurance is relatively low on the stress list for many of us - maybe half - but it is high stress for me as I pay my own way. I would say that FOX news style media is one of the high-stress items for many. But, it's bigger than just FOX news. We have that ultra-high achievement drive (again, not all of us) for excessive wealth, perfect beauty, perfect diets. Very few of us have riches, beauty and a healthy lifestyle, but we feel deep within our guts that we should have it all. So, we feel stress. Something like that.
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oldandknew
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 May, 2006 05:50 pm
I've read from time to time how some Americans are short of medical/health insurance & that some are either scared of needing hospital treatment or simply have to do without certain medicines.
It also seems a lot of health care promises get lost in the Small Print of any insurance plan.
The same can apply in the UK if you buy aditional medical insurance from an insurance broker.
It seems that just like hindsight, Small Print is a wonderful science
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flushd
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 May, 2006 05:58 pm
This is very interesting! Now, it's easy to tell the Americans are not a healthy lot.
It is a bit of surprise that Brits are healthier, in a way. Maybe I'm out to lunch. I don't have a lot to go on.
But - being so cramped up in that little country. High prices for everything. Icky foods.

What keeps the Brits healthy? What's the secret? Great tv and hot lovin' in bed?
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Lord Ellpus
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 May, 2006 06:10 pm
I think lk touched on the answer, flushd. We tend to not take things too seriously over here, and put a lot of effort into having a laugh whenever the opportunity arises.

Most of us don't give a stuff as to who is more successful or rich. It's nice if it comes our way, but we put much more emphasis on going down to the pub or meeting up with friends, or watching TV and relaxing.

Life is hectic, don't get me wrong, but it's not worth worrying about all of the time in such minute detail.
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littlek
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 May, 2006 06:12 pm
LordE, I dunno if hot humid summers with sun make up for the bitter, windy winters to make up a climate of 'nice weather'.

OAK - 43 million americans have no health insurance. I pay $315/month for a "full coverage" plan which doesn't cover prescriptions. So. I pay $315 per month, $15-20 each time I see a doctor and full price for meds. Great deal, eh? Other options are $520/month, $15/visit and $20/medication. Or there's the option where I pay all expenses up to $500 or $1000/year and then the insurance kicks in and covers some stuff. And, finally, there's catastophic imsurance which covers major emergencies and costs much less than the rest. Now, dental insurance is..... <blahblahblah>
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ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 May, 2006 06:18 pm
What I read at the food forum I go to suggests that generally speaking, Britons have much better/healthier food options easily available to them than most Americans.

Even the prepared foods/partially prepared foods available in Great Britain seem MUCH better than anything I've ever seen in the U.S.

Jamie Oliver's school food program was, I hope, the leading edge of even healthier eating in Great Britain.

~~~~

The American love of the car - and the great American suburb - are also a factor, IMNSHO.

I was always shocked that you literally could not walk to get milk or bread or anything from Setanta's place. You simply had to get in the car to get anything. It seems like the suburbs are designed for cars, not walkers. I don't know if suburbs in Great Britain are the same, but my impression is that walking is simply more possible there.
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ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 May, 2006 06:27 pm
Quote:
Children will soon have to wait until school's out to pop the top on sugary soft drinks blamed for much of the rise in childhood obesity.

Non-diet sodas will be yanked from schools, and other drinks will be downsized under a deal announced Wednesday by former President Bill Clinton and the nation's largest beverage distributors.

"This is a truly bold step forward in the struggle to help 35 million young people lead healthier lives," said Clinton, whose foundation has targeted obesity in children for the past year. "This one policy can add years and years and years to the lives of a very large number of young people."


http://www.forbes.com/home/feeds/ap/2006/05/03/ap2719167.html
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oldandknew
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 May, 2006 06:37 pm
beth --- walking in the UK is no big deal as a rule. the suberbs are all well lit at night so walking to the corner store is no problem. supermarkets on large retail parks may be a problem in some areas if you have to cross major hi-ways or go down local lanes with no walkway/paths.

there is a lot more awareness about food storage & preparation these days. we have a greater international cuisine as well. our supermarkets have foods from all over the world. europe, asia, mexico, usa. you call it, we got it

Little k ----- yeah our health care, for all the complaints, is pretty good. in my recent experience, if you need treatment you will get it & you don't get some checkout clerk asking you for vast armfulls of cash.
I have to take 3 different medications a day for ever. I get them for free cos of my age & the nature of the illness. if i had to pay, it be about £20.00 a month ---- That's about $35.00 I think. When I see my specialist it's free, same as if I see my GP or need any extra treatment. Sure it's all been pre-paid thru taxation NHS. I don't know the costs are these days but it's not a great amount
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littlek
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 May, 2006 06:52 pm
cost of medication is another thing all together!
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hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 May, 2006 07:08 pm
mind the gap
i know this is not about health-care or insurance ... but ...
after we came back from our five weeks of vacation both mrs h and i got a rather nasty "cold" - caughing , sneezing ... couldn't stop the hacking .
yesterday morning mrs h phoned the doctor's office ... come in at 2:45 the receptionist told her . the doctor saw us promptly at 2:45 (wearing a mask - smart idea !) . he checked our ears , nose , throat , listened to our ratttling chest and prescribed a five-day dose of anti-biotics .
"see me next day wednesday , but call if you develop more serious problems " , he said when we were leaving after about twenty minutes .
the prescription cost us $1.50 each , could have had it for free if we would have gone to a "super-pharmacy" , but the pharmacy in the medical office is handy and pays for our parking . we had to pay $11 out of pocket for the cough syrup since it is not a prescription medication .
of course , the office visit was not "free" ; we pay $50 a month for the government health-insurance and pay through our sales and income taxes ("socialized medical system" - what a nasty description!!!) , but it sure was convenient . no worry if our premium payments are affordable and up-to-date . no worry about insurance being cancelled .
for the time being , i think i'll stick with "socialized medical system".
hbg
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cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 May, 2006 07:24 pm
While I won't argue that too many Americans are overweight, which causes all of the other problems you cite, you're comparing apples to oranges....
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cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 May, 2006 07:28 pm
Re: mind the gap
hamburger wrote:
i know this is not about health-care or insurance ... but ...
after we came back from our five weeks of vacation both mrs h and i got a rather nasty "cold" - caughing , sneezing ... couldn't stop the hacking .
yesterday morning mrs h phoned the doctor's office ... come in at 2:45 the receptionist told her . the doctor saw us promptly at 2:45 (wearing a mask - smart idea !) . he checked our ears , nose , throat , listened to our ratttling chest and prescribed a five-day dose of anti-biotics .
"see me next day wednesday , but call if you develop more serious problems " , he said when we were leaving after about twenty minutes .
the prescription cost us $1.50 each , could have had it for free if we would have gone to a "super-pharmacy" , but the pharmacy in the medical office is handy and pays for our parking . we had to pay $11 out of pocket for the cough syrup since it is not a prescription medication .
of course , the office visit was not "free" ; we pay $50 a month for the government health-insurance and pay through our sales and income taxes ("socialized medical system" - what a nasty description!!!) , but it sure was convenient . no worry if our premium payments are affordable and up-to-date . no worry about insurance being cancelled .
for the time being , i think i'll stick with "socialized medical system".
hbg


While there are a few 3-5 day antibiotics, traditionally they last 10 days. Sounds to me like your SMS shortchanged you on the cycle. You'll probably be sick again in few days (come back and let us know).

I was in an HMO for 20 years. While much better than SM, you still had to make sure they treated you correctly and gave you the right prescriptions. Ultimately, you are responsible for your own health.
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hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 May, 2006 07:36 pm
U.K. healthier
we were in london last about four years ago for a few days . we stayed at a thistle hotel near hyde park and had both b'fast and dinner at the hotel : both good , plenty of choice and reasonable price - i believe dinner was L 11 and included a glass of wine (we received a discount because we had booked with a group) .
"high tea" at harrods was a splendid affair - we received a second "tray" for free when we spoke a few words of italian to the waiters - boy , that was service !
did have "a bite" in a caff near the tower of london - it was frightful , weak tea and yesterday's sandwiches (but it was the exception).
hbg
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cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 May, 2006 07:38 pm
Did they mistake you for an American?
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hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 May, 2006 08:41 pm
british
nah ! hard to slot me in - more often than not , i'll pass as a dutchman (likely because of low-german accent) , but i have been asked if i come from the island of jamaica - go figure ? hbg

tally the banana ...
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cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 May, 2006 08:43 pm
Movement of jah people.
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farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 May, 2006 04:54 am
TODAY is the 48th anniversary of "THE BIG MAC".
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