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I am now a registered voter... but I need help

 
 
Slappy Doo Hoo
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Mar, 2006 05:32 pm
mycdplayerisbroke wrote:
btw slappy, i don't know if you remember helping me but i'm seeing some huge gains with working out and all that. 15 pounds in a month. i discovered the joy of eating. thanks again.


Yes, I remember that. Congrats, 15 lbs in a month is awesome! Keep it up.
0 Replies
 
old europe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Mar, 2006 05:34 pm
Slappy Doo Hoo wrote:
Democrats sit at starbucks on their laptops, whining about trees being cut down and how black lesbians are discriminated against in arcades. O h yea, and they drive Volvos. Republicans drive pickup trucks, shoot guns, and bash queers on the weekends for fun.


Crazielady420 wrote:
Interesting way of putting it I must add... Is Bush a republican then?


I'm amazed.... How did you get that from Sappy's post, Crazielady?

Very Happy

Oh, and welcome in the politics thingy, by the way!
0 Replies
 
okie
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Mar, 2006 11:44 pm
Re: I am now a registered voter... but I need help
Crazielady420 wrote:
I have no idea about politics, I am scared to even look in this section of the forum... I have no idea the difference between political parties. Nothing... I have never branched out into politics...

Can anyone teach me anything...

I know there are a lot of different views... I just don't want to go and vote for someone because that is who my friend or family member is choosing, I want ot vote for them because I know what I am doing!


Heres a 10 point plan quickly put together:

1. Decide to think for yourself. Don't believe something just to be trendy.
2. Listen to news and talk shows. Don't believe much of anything even if presented as news. Check other sources and consider other possibilities besides what is presented.
3. Believe in principles.
4. Go to the library and find 2 or 3 old books about political philosophies, socialism, communism, free enterprise, democracy, etc. and read them.
5. Read the Bill of Rights. Read the Gettysburg address.
6. Decide whether individual rights and responsibilities are more important or less important than groups and the "common good."
7. Then look at the parties and judge which one does what you prefer.
8. Vote for people that uphold your chosen principles, not for who promises you more money for your town, your state, or you.
9. Vote for honest people, not crooks.
10. If your candidate loses, be happy anyway, take care of family, get involved in a business, job, hobbies you like and thank your lucky stars you live in a country you have the freedom to do that.
0 Replies
 
dagmaraka
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Mar, 2006 11:52 pm
btw, from europe Democrats and Republicans look awfully alike. There is no threat of either one turning communist, or another Nazi. They are kinda like Tweedledee and Tweedledum.

..but of course democrats are better.

Noddy got it right: go for the newspaper. make yourself read the first page, then some of domestic and international politics that catches your eye. At first you may have no idea what you're doing, what are you looking for... but that will come. Keep reading.
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JPB
 
  1  
Reply Sat 11 Mar, 2006 09:54 am
Nice list, okie, and I agree with Tweedledee and Tweedledum.

For those from Massachusettes, does Massachusette require voters to register for one of the parties, or are the primaries open?
0 Replies
 
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Sat 11 Mar, 2006 10:21 am
Mass. is very heavily Democrat. Doesn't mean you have to be, of course, but that's how this state tends to go. Can't recall when the state last went for a Republican, hmm, might've been one of the Reagon elections. Dunno.

Anyway -- next election -- the big stuff is the first Tuesday in November although sometimes there are local runoff things at other times. Also, there are primaries, but that's only for the Presidency.

Every 4 years, we vote for a President. Those are even-numbered years and are always the 00 year in a century where the first two numbers in a century are even (such as 20 for the current century), then just keep adding a number that's a multiple of 4. So the next Presidential election is the first Tuesday in November, in 2008. Primaries and caucuses (states have one or the other) happen before then, that's how we choose who is going to be the party's choice for the general election. These things happen during the Spring and Summer right before the election, so the next crop is in the Spring and Summer of 2008. New Hampshire has the first primary and it's in March. Mass. -- hmm -- we do ours in April? May? I can't recall. The later the primary, the less likely that voting in a primary is meaningful, unless the candidates are really close. In 2004, Kerry pulled ahead pretty quickly, so states that voted in a later primary didn't have much of a chance to select the Democratic candidate. When there's an incumbent candidate (e. g. someone already in the Presidency), there's very rarely a challenge to that person running again. So in 2004 Bush was more or less unopposed for the Republican Presidential nomination.

The nomination, of course, is not the same as the actual election. Voting in one does not mean you're committed in the other.

Then over the Summer, the parties all have conventions. Big speeches are made and the parties' candidates are officially nominated. These are generally pretty scripted although every now and then there's a surprise, particularly if the primary/caucus voting was close. Also, it's a place to see rising political stars, the people who will probably run for President over the next 20 or so years.

The candidate also announces his or her running mate, e. g. the person they want for Vice President. Sometimes that's the person with the second-highest number of primary/caucus votes. Sometimes it's someone with a lot of political experience, or from a different area of the country, or someone younger. All of this is in an effort to "balance the ticket". The idea is to make the VP candidate someone that voters are also interested in, but for different reasons. They usually have similar ideology to the Presidential candidate but have these other differences. For Bush, Cheney was selected probably more because he has a lot of political experience than anything else. Ronald Reagan chose George Bush, Sr. because he had the second-highest number of votes. Jimmy Carter chose Walter Mondale because Carter is from Georgia and Mondale is from Minnesota. So you see this in action.

In October and early November, the campaigns really intensify. You might see debates on TV. You'll see and hear ads on TV, radio and perhaps the 'net. You'll also get a postcard telling you where your polling place is and its hours of operation. It is the law, I believe, that you must be granted an hour (by your employer) to vote on Election Day.

The method of voting varies by where you are. The last time I voted, I was given a black magic marker and a computer-scannable sheet. I was asked to stand at a spot with a tall table (almost like a lectern) and high sides so that no one could see what I was doing. I filled in the circles and then, when I was done, gave the paper and marker to the person at the desk. Before that, I had used old-fashioned voting machines. You go in, you pull a huge (heavy!) lever to the side and a curtain closes. You flip little levers to the side. Red means you vote for someone, black means you didn't choose someone. Then, when done, you flip the big lever back to the other side and the curtain opens again. Some people get paper ballots to mark, others get cards to punch. It depends on the district.

Once you've handed in your ballot, you're done, and can't change your mind. And one thing, you don't need to vote for every single office if you don't want to. You can even get a ballot and mark nothing on it, or write in a candidate's name. This is your right.

Your vote is private. No one needs to know about it unless you tell them. You don't have to honor a promise to vote for anyone. No one can buy it from you and, if they try to, they are violating election laws. Your vote is your own.

Now, the Presidency isn't the only race out there. Senators are elected every six years. All states have two Senators, so it's staggered. In one year, Senator A is up for election, then two years later, Senator B's seat is up, and then two years later, neither Senator is up, and then two years after that, Senator A is up again. The House of Representatives holds elections every even-numbered year. Everyone in the House is up for election then. You have one Representative in the House. Governors are chosen every four years, in even-numbered years. Gubernatorial races vary from state to state, so Massachusetts might have a race during the year that New York doesn't and California does, or whatever.

In 2006,
* Senator Kennedy is up for reelection in Mass. Likely challengers are:
    Kevin Paul Scott (R) Ken Chase (R) Daniel Christopher Wetherbee (R)

* Governor Romney's seat is up (he's not running for reelection). Here are the likely candidates for Governor:
    Deval Patrick - Democrat - former assistant U.S. Attorney General and Coca Cola executive Thomas Reilly - Democrat - current Massachusetts Attorney General and former practicing attorney Gary Lee - Republican - selectman of Norwood, MA and attorney Kerry Healey - Republican - current Lt. Governor Christy Mihos - Independent - Convenience store magnate, former member of the Massachusetts Turnpike Authority

* I don't know which Congressional district you're in, but the candidates for the House are:
    District 01 John W. Olver (D) * District 02 Richard E. Neal (D) * District 03 James P. McGovern (D) * District 04 Barney Frank (D) * Charles A. Morse (R) District 05 Marty Meehan (D) * District 06 John F. Tierney (D) * Richard W. Barton (R) Peter G. Torkildsen (R) District 07 Edward J. Markey (D) * District 08 Michael E. Capuano (D) * District 09 Stephen F. Lynch (D) * Philip Dunkelbarger (D) District 10 Bill Delahunt (D) * (incumbents are starred)


Masschusetts Congressional districts are mapped here: http://www.sec.state.ma.us/cis/cismap/mapidx.htm I happen to be in the 8th district, I think you might be in the 9th.

Mass. Directory of Political Parties: http://www.sec.state.ma.us/ele/elepar/paridx.htm
But it appears you don't need to declare for a political party: http://www.sec.state.ma.us/ele/elepdf/partyenrollstat.pdf this indicates that in 2004 a little over half of all voters hadn't declared for any political party.

I liked these sites for my info: http://www.centerforpolitics.org/crystalball/article.php?id=LJS2005092201
http://www.opensecrets.org/states/election.asp?State=MA
http://www.sec.state.ma.us/cis/cismap/mapidx.htm

Hope this helps!
0 Replies
 
mele42846
 
  1  
Reply Sat 11 Mar, 2006 04:40 pm
Massachusetts disgraced itself for all time in my eyes when they let the "Moral Conscience of the Senate"--haha--go after he should have been charged with manslaughter. That showed me that politics and not principle rules in Massachusetts.

People may not be aware that the judge in Massachusetts made the SHAMEFUL FINDING--QUOTE

"Considering the unblemished record of the defendant, and insofar as the Commonwealth represents this is not a case where he was really trying to conceal his identity and since the defendant hass already been and will continue to be punished far beyond anything this court can, impose, the ends of justice would be satisfied by the imposition of the minimum jail sentence and the suspension of that sentence..."

ONLY IN MASSACHUSETTS!!!!!!
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2PacksAday
 
  1  
Reply Sat 11 Mar, 2006 05:25 pm
jespah wrote:
Mass. is very heavily Democrat. Doesn't mean you have to be, of course, but that's how this state tends to go. Can't recall when the state last went for a Republican, hmm, might've been one of the Reagon elections. Dunno.




Mass voted for Reagan both times....1980, 1984.
0 Replies
 
DontTreadOnMe
 
  1  
Reply Sat 11 Mar, 2006 06:11 pm
Re: I am now a registered voter... but I need help
okie wrote:
Crazielady420 wrote:
I have no idea about politics, I am scared to even look in this section of the forum... I have no idea the difference between political parties. Nothing... I have never branched out into politics...

Can anyone teach me anything...

I know there are a lot of different views... I just don't want to go and vote for someone because that is who my friend or family member is choosing, I want ot vote for them because I know what I am doing!


Heres a 10 point plan quickly put together:


FINALLY!! something that i completely agree with okie on.. Laughing

crazielady420, another thing is to not only hear what politicians say, but also watch what they do.

and talk with other people that are political, preferrably of differing opinions. it's best to get as much info as you can. it's time consuming, but is really fascinating.
0 Replies
 
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Sat 11 Mar, 2006 07:07 pm
2PacksAday wrote:
jespah wrote:
Mass. is very heavily Democrat. Doesn't mean you have to be, of course, but that's how this state tends to go. Can't recall when the state last went for a Republican, hmm, might've been one of the Reagon elections. Dunno.




Mass voted for Reagan both times....1980, 1984.


Thanks for the info.
0 Replies
 
Crazielady420
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Mar, 2006 07:54 am
Holy wow... that's alot of info! Thanks everyone... I knew it was going to be a little while to catch on... but it may take a little longer than I expected!
0 Replies
 
blueflame1
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Mar, 2006 10:39 am
Clinton adviser: 'Look out, here comes Al Gore'
RAW STORY
Published: March 13, 2006


Like a completely refurbished "pre-owned vehicle," Al Gore seems to be positioning himself to Hillary Clinton's left and greener than John Kerry for a run at the 2008 Democratic nomination for president. His slogan might well read "reelect Al Gore," writes former Bill Clinton adviser Dick Morris in a syndicated column Monday. (Excerpted here since some were having trouble getting site to load. Full editorial here.)

#
The former vice president's slashing attacks on the administration and his stalwart, if misguided, opposition to the Iraq war leave him without the complications and complexes that will devil Clinton as she seeks to appeal to the unforgiving left of the Democratic Party.

And Gore may be a man whose time has come in his party. It was he who warned of climate change and predicted its consequences. Hurricane Katrina was just a fulfillment of the prophesies Gore wrote about in his late-1980s book "Earth in the Balance." He has been an energy-conservation nut for years, and his obsessions with alternatives to oil will play better and better as we come to realize how our addiction to oil has led us to dependency on the dealers of this particular drug - Iran, the Saudi royal family and Hugo Chavez.

The Democratic base's anger at Gore's defeat in 2000 was assuaged by the worse Kerry defeat of 2004. The idea he was an incompetent candidate has been replaced in Democratic iconography by the idea he was cheated out of the presidency. The hiatus has healed his reputation with the base in much the same way the negative rap on Nixon for losing in 1960 was ameliorated by the Goldwater wipeout of 1964.

History indicates that candidates who won the popular vote but lost in the Electoral College have all come back to win revenge in subsequent elections. Andrew Jackson, cheated in 1824, won in 1828. Grover Cleveland, cheated in 1888, triumphed in 1892. Samuel Tilden, who won the popular vote in 1876, never ran again, but he dealt away the White House in a deal for the withdrawal for federal troops from the South, allowing the Ku Klux Klan to take over. (By the way, for a great history of how this era kindled the racism we have lived with since, read Eric Foner's new book, "Forever Free.")
0 Replies
 
mele42846
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Mar, 2006 04:43 pm
I think it would be a big plus for America if Al Gore ran in 2008. I would send him a donation for his campaign.

I will never forget the Al Gore, the policy wonk who knew politics backwards and forwards, debating with the allegedly politically ignorant George W. Bush, who, as everyone knows, is very inarticulate.

Al Gore positively" destroyed" George W, Bush is those debates, did he not?

That was, of course the reason why Al Gore won the presidential election in 2000!!!
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