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Why is my dog jealous all the time?

 
 
azure
 
Reply Fri 6 Jan, 2006 09:30 am
I recently took in a stray dog. I found her sleeping in the street in my neighborhood. She was in bad shape and I just decided to bring her to the vet and then unable to find a home I quickly realized I didn't want her to go so I decided to keep her.

However; ever since I took her in she literally follows me everywhere, even if I go to the bathroom she gets up from where ever she is and follows me. Also she gets very jealous if anyone else even touches me or if I even pet the cats. She whines and looks pretty pathetic when my attention is not soley focused on her.

Is this a normal thing for a stray or perhaps the breed of dog she is?
I've done a little reading up on it but I would like to ask someone who might have had a similar experience. The vet classified her as being a Jack Russell terrier. I have had german shepards and beagles but she seems to be in another realm entirely as in regards to attention.
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Jan, 2006 09:35 am
Dogs are extremely gregarious animals, and like their wolf ancestors, and very much focused on the members of their immediate family group--and the pack to a lesser extent. If you found a stray sleeping on the street, it is very likely that she has been emotionally traumatized by the event. It may take literally years for her to be comfortable with the thought that you would leave her presence, but not abandon her. I don't know you or the dog, but i strongly suspect that she is motivated by anxiety. If this is the case, it will eventually go away--mostly--but it will take a very long time, and she will never be entirely free from the separation anxiety.

Letting her get to know other people and dogs with whom it is reasonable to expect she can frequently make contact will expand the circle of her acquaintance, and help in the long process of reassuring her. If you don't intend to keep her for the rest of her life, it is imperative that you get her into a good home in which she will spend the rest of her life as soon as possible.
0 Replies
 
Phoenix32890
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Jan, 2006 09:36 am
Quote:
The Jack Russell is a fearless, happy, alert, confident, intelligent and lively hunting dog. These qualities make him a sturdy, vigorous companion, ready to meet the world on a moment's notice, and, unless he is appropriately trained and exercised, can be subverted into wanton destructiveness. The Jack Russell Terrier Club of America describes the character thus: "The unique personality of this feisty little terrier is capturing the hearts of many, but they are not a dog for everyone. While adaptable to a variety of environments, they are first and foremost bred to be hunting dogs."

As appealing as he can be_ and that is very appealing_ the Jack Russell is not the ideal pet for everyone. He has his share of terrier aggression towards other dogs and is deadly towards animals it considers to be prey. Thus cats, hamsters, gerbils, and other household pets can be in jeopardy if the dog is not supervised or confined. Furthermore, this militant streak makes it difficult to keep a Jack Russell in a home with other dogs, even others of its breed. Like most terriers, the Jack Russell is a digger and a barker; if not given enough opportunity to indulge these inclinations outside, he may dig holes in the furniture and bark at everything that moves.

However, in spite of caveats about its sometimes irascible temperament towards fellow canines and small animals, the Jack Russell can be a terrific family pet. He has a gentle and kindly nature with people and is usually friendly with small children -- if they are well-behaved. He will likely not put up with poking, prodding, or abusive rough-housing from boisterous or ill-behaved youngsters, but he is amenable to learning tricks and games.


http://www.canismajor.com/dog/jackruss.html

Hmmm................This does not sound at all like your dog. Possible early experiences may have made the pooch insecure!
0 Replies
 
azure
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Jan, 2006 10:04 am
Setanta wrote:
Dogs are extremely gregarious animals, and like their wolf ancestors, and very much focused on the members of their immediate family group--and the pack to a lesser extent. If you found a stray sleeping on the street, it is very likely that she has been emotionally traumatized by the event. It may take literally years for her to be comfortable with the thought that you would leave her presence, but not abandon her. I don't know you or the dog, but i strongly suspect that she is motivated by anxiety. If this is the case, it will eventually go away--mostly--but it will take a very long time, and she will never be entirely free from the separation anxiety.

Letting her get to know other people and dogs with whom it is reasonable to expect she can frequently make contact will expand the circle of her acquaintance, and help in the long process of reassuring her. If you don't intend to keep her for the rest of her life, it is imperative that you get her into a good home in which she will spend the rest of her life as soon as possible.


Thank you. I suppose if it takes years than that is what I have. She is like my child now and I do intend on keeping her. Although she is still extremely jealous and follows me it has gotten somewhat better. It usually takes her a few more minutes now to follow suit but if she doesn't see me after a time she will come look for me.

I spend alot of time currently being able to work from my computer at home so the attention she needs hasn't been such a huge issue. My worry however is when I do have to work back in the field that she will think I abandoned her all day. Sad
0 Replies
 
azure
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Jan, 2006 10:37 am
Phoenix32890 wrote:
Quote:
The Jack Russell is a fearless, happy, alert, confident, intelligent and lively hunting dog. These qualities make him a sturdy, vigorous companion, ready to meet the world on a moment's notice, and, unless he is appropriately trained and exercised, can be subverted into wanton destructiveness. The Jack Russell Terrier Club of America describes the character thus: "The unique personality of this feisty little terrier is capturing the hearts of many, but they are not a dog for everyone. While adaptable to a variety of environments, they are first and foremost bred to be hunting dogs."

As appealing as he can be_ and that is very appealing_ the Jack Russell is not the ideal pet for everyone. He has his share of terrier aggression towards other dogs and is deadly towards animals it considers to be prey. Thus cats, hamsters, gerbils, and other household pets can be in jeopardy if the dog is not supervised or confined. Furthermore, this militant streak makes it difficult to keep a Jack Russell in a home with other dogs, even others of its breed. Like most terriers, the Jack Russell is a digger and a barker; if not given enough opportunity to indulge these inclinations outside, he may dig holes in the furniture and bark at everything that moves.

However, in spite of caveats about its sometimes irascible temperament towards fellow canines and small animals, the Jack Russell can be a terrific family pet. He has a gentle and kindly nature with people and is usually friendly with small children -- if they are well-behaved. He will likely not put up with poking, prodding, or abusive rough-housing from boisterous or ill-behaved youngsters, but he is amenable to learning tricks and games.


http://www.canismajor.com/dog/jackruss.html

Hmmm................This does not sound at all like your dog. Possible early experiences may have made the pooch insecure!


Thank you for that. She does exhibit many of those traits you listed. She digs holes in the yard and has captured quite a few poor chipmunks who met their demise to her. She is hostile and aggressive towards other dogs but yet loves children. She is not hyper most of the time as many little dogs are. She is probably the smartest dog I've ever had.

I do believe she was probably abused from the condition I found her in, which probably has alot to do with her jealousy and insecurity. It breaks my heart however I have grown to love her dearly and I'll just have to find ways to reassure her and hope over time that she'll realize I'm never going to abandon her.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Jan, 2006 10:38 am
It would help if you could find a good dog-sitter well in advance of going into the field. You could introduce her, and allow her to make friends. Then leave her there and go away for fifteen minutes. Repeat this until she remains calm, and then increase the length of your absence. There is, unfortunately, no way to "hurry" this--she needs to learn, emotionally, that she can rely on you and that she has a permanent home, that she will not again be abandoned. You've taken on a huge and difficult task--but one which i believe will be ultimately rewarding for you both, and one which i personally consider noble, and for which i salute you.
0 Replies
 
Maximou
 
  1  
Reply Fri 16 Dec, 2011 08:00 pm
@azure,
I too have the same situation, although my pooch wasn't abandoned, she was not overly loved or looked after and most days just left to roam around the grounds of the block of units she lived in. I too now just adore her. She also follows me everywhere, especially when she knows I am going out without her. To try to help her feel more secure I take her to every dog friendly situation I can ie; visiting friends etc. doggy daycare once a week, and sometimes when I get up of the couch and she is asleep at my feet and goes to get up to follow me, I tell her to "stay", which she is starting to do, this shows her I am going to come back after short intervals to build her confidence in me. Another thing you could do, is put an old t shirt in your bed to get your scent on it, keep it there until you are ready to change your sheets each time, and when you leave home without him, make sure he has it on his bed, so you are still close if you are not there. If I am going out on a Sat nite, I drop her off at other freinds houses with there dog, she doesn't always overly play with the other dog, but she still has company around her, It's great for your friends dogs/kids too....I truly believe aswell, the fact that I get anxious when I have to leave her, she picks up on....so once I have calmed myself haha, I don't pay a huge amount of attention to her, so it's not a big deal that I'm going out. One more thing, is I have a secure yard, (putting a doggy door in process), but she stays outside during the day, has a little dog kennel, which I put in my tshirt her blanket and her two fave toys...and she loves going in there and feels very snug....( got it from Crazy Clarks for $55, it's awesome),I also try to leave her with something to entertain her ie; a juicy uncooked bone or her kong toy stuffed with frozen treats, this way she is focused on that and not me going out the door. i'm a long way off her being a 100% well adjusted dog, but patience. love, discipline and excercise will pay off in the end, that's just the way it is....Hope these tips help :-)
0 Replies
 
kylea
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Dec, 2011 02:26 am
i have same experience . When i have a first child, i paid lot of attention to my baby .My dog was jeaulous . I was obliged to give her to my friend
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