1
   

Getting "frocked"?

 
 
Reply Fri 16 Dec, 2005 09:27 pm
I talked to my brother on the phone today and what he said didn't really hit me until later.

He is in the Army and he is receiving a promotion and I think he said something about "getting frocked" on such and such date.

When I first started thinking about it I thought maybe I was mis-remembering what he said but I Googled it and it seems that "frocking" is indeed the term used.

Where did that term come from?

Do you know?
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 1,537 • Replies: 9
No top replies

 
LionTamerX
 
  1  
Reply Fri 16 Dec, 2005 09:43 pm
I have heard of monks getting de-frocked, but never soldiers getting frocked.
Prolly better getting frocked than fragged.
0 Replies
 
mac11
 
  1  
Reply Fri 16 Dec, 2005 10:17 pm
This site seems to explain it pretty well:

http://usmilitary.about.com/library/milinfo/blnavyfrocking.htm
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Fri 16 Dec, 2005 10:24 pm
Hey thanks, mac!

I'm guessing that the army uses the term in the same way that the navy does.


Quote:
Regarding the practice of frocking itself, there are various instances in Navy Regulations at least as early as 1802 of personnel assuming the uniform of the next higher rank, not necessarily with higher pay, when appointed by proper authority to assume the duties and responsibilities of that rank prior to actual promotion.


This, in particular sounds like his situation. They don't let him wear the uniform but he has assumed the duties without the actual promotion.

It sounds like the word deals with the clergy too - I wonder if they call it getting "frocked" when they receive their orders (is that the right term?)?
0 Replies
 
mac11
 
  1  
Reply Fri 16 Dec, 2005 10:29 pm
Yep, 477 hits for "getting frocked" on google - most seem to be military references.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sat 17 Dec, 2005 12:03 am
boomerang wrote:


This, in particular sounds like his situation. They don't let him wear the uniform but he has assumed the duties without the actual promotion.



If he's assumed the duties without a concomitant pay raise, Boomerang, he's gotten more than frocked. Smile
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Sat 17 Dec, 2005 07:25 am
Ha! You could be right JTT.

I think promotions can be in the pipeline for a while before they actually take place.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sat 17 Dec, 2005 09:01 am
<I thought everyone knew that frock/frocking had to do with clothing. You learn something new here every single blinkin' day>
0 Replies
 
LionTamerX
 
  1  
Reply Sat 17 Dec, 2005 12:27 pm
ehBeth wrote:
<I thought everyone knew that frock/frocking had to do with clothing. You learn something new here every single blinkin' day>


Is that your tatoo in your avatar ?

Two thumbs up here in NC. Way up.
0 Replies
 
syntinen
 
  1  
Reply Sat 17 Dec, 2005 12:33 pm
The Royal Navy did something similar in the era of wooden sailing ships. The rank of Commodore (which is now a permanent rank between Captain and Rear-Admira), was then a temporary appointment; the Navy would make up a flotilla for a specific mission and appoint a captain Commodore of it for as long as it took to do the job. In effect he was a temporary admiral. The Navy found this device very handy as promotion to admiral was based strictly on seniority, and there was no other way to put talented junior men in command.

The rank of Brigadier was used similarly in the British Army at the same time, to make a colonel into a temporary general.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

deal - Question by WBYeats
Drs. = female doctor? - Question by oristarA
Let pupils abandon spelling rules, says academic - Discussion by Robert Gentel
Please, I need help. - Question by imsak
Is this sentence grammatically correct? - Question by Sydney-Strock
"come from" - Question by mcook
 
  1. Forums
  2. » Getting "frocked"?
Copyright © 2021 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.07 seconds on 09/22/2021 at 11:44:37