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FIFA World Cup 2006 [R]

 
 
Lord Ellpus
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Jul, 2006 11:05 am
A lip reader, working on behalf of the Sun newspaper in the UK, has apparently determined that Matterazi called Zidane "The son of a terrorist whore".
This coincided with Zidane's mother having fallen ill earlier that day, and going into hospital. Apparently the Italian team were aware of this fact.

Zidane is of Algerian descent, and many Algerians are extremely sensitive about being portrayed as terrorists.

It's a wonder Zidane didn't stretch out a leg to the prone Materazzi (if this lip reading is accurate) and gently place a football boot right up the Italian's left nostril.
0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Jul, 2006 11:16 am
kitchenpete wrote:
nimh wrote:
Walter Hinteler wrote:
But those things we were generally praised for - traffic, humour, beer, countrysite etc etc -

wait wait back up the truck..

..the germans were praised for their sense of humour?


Laughing I wondered about that, too! Laughing

Maybe Walter was being ironic in this instance. I've seen broadcasts of Fasching and for all the laughter in the hall at the jokes about bodily functions, I can't say that I think German humour is anything other than basic.


Hola Pierre de la Cuisine. About that...haven't you ever seen a British audience laughing at a Jim Davidson gig? Or at Bernard Manning, or Roy Chubby Brown? Not too much sophistication or refinement there...and these guys are very popular, i.e. mass audiences.
0 Replies
 
George
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Jul, 2006 11:40 am
Lord Ellpus wrote:
A lip reader, working on behalf of the Sun newspaper in the UK, has apparently determined that Matterazi called Zidane "The son of a terrorist whore".
This coincided with Zidane's mother having fallen ill earlier that day, and going into hospital. Apparently the Italian team were aware of this fact.

Zidane is of Algerian descent, and many Algerians are extremely sensitive about being portrayed as terrorists.

It's a wonder Zidane didn't stretch out a leg to the prone Materazzi (if this lip reading is accurate) and gently place a football boot right up the Italian's left nostril.


From ESPN SoccerNet:

Materazzi, 32, told Gazetta dello Sport: 'I held his shirt for a few seconds only, then he turned to me and talked to me, jeering.

'He looked at me with a huge arrogance and said, 'If you really want my shirt I'll give it to you afterwards'. I replied with an insult, that's true.'

Materazzi has not elaborated on what he did say, but one report suggested he responded with: 'I'd rather take the shirt off your wife'.

He has denied, however, some of the more vile insults referring to his wife or sister or calling him a terrorist.

'It was one of those insults you're told dozens of times and that you often let fall on a pitch,' Materazzi said.

'I did not call him a terrorist. I am not a cultured person and I don't even know what an Islamist terrorist is.'

He added: 'For me the mother is sacred, you know that.'
0 Replies
 
Lord Ellpus
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Jul, 2006 12:26 pm
Yeh...right.

I'm surprised he didn't throw in the bit about joining the Priesthood when he retires from football.

Oh...and his charity work, of course.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/football/world_cup_2006/5168622.stm
0 Replies
 
margo
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Jul, 2006 02:08 pm
Walter Hinteler wrote:
An Italian dies and arrives - where else? - in heaven.

In the lobby there, he asks St. Peter: "Why do you have about 200 clocks hanging here?"

St. Peter: "We have one for every nation playing football. And every time, some footballer makes a dive, the seconds hand is turned one second in advance."

The Italian looks around, notices the different times at various clocks and than wonders why the Italian isn't there.

"Ah, well the Italian clock. It's in the kitchen. We use it as ventilator."
Laughing Razz Twisted Evil
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Jul, 2006 02:07 am
fbaezer wrote:
German sense of humour IS laughing matter, Milord.

We laugh a lot when we're told about what the Germans consider funny.


There's today an article in our local paper, about four (resp. five, one is staying there for two months) comprehensive school pupils, staying in my native town for doing a four week work experience: they are quoted as having said, their view about Germany totally was changed. e.g. people were much friendlier and had much more humour than in their town of origin.

They were from Holmes Chapel Comprehensive School (a village in Cheshire, close to Manchester).
0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Jul, 2006 02:12 am
Walter Hinteler wrote:
fbaezer wrote:
German sense of humour IS laughing matter, Milord.

We laugh a lot when we're told about what the Germans consider funny.


There's today an article in our local paper, about four (resp. five, one is staying there for two months) comprehensive school pupils, staying in my native town for doing a four week work experience: they are quoted as having said, their view about Germany totally was changed. e.g. people were much friendlier and had much more humour than in their town of origin.

They were from Holmes Chapel Comprehensive School (a village in Cheshire, close to Manchester).


Absolutely, these Cheshire folk are a miserable bunch.

Morning, Steve. :wink:
0 Replies
 
Raphillon
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Jul, 2006 03:46 am
Lord Ellpus wrote:
Yeh...right.

I'm surprised he didn't throw in the bit about joining the Priesthood when he retires from football.

Oh...and his charity work, of course.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/football/world_cup_2006/5168622.stm


Materazzi is very far from santity. He is a violent player, verbally and physically... Un vero stronzo!

Well actually Zidane hitting Materazzi is a kind of roles inversion Rolling Eyes

But Zidane should reply with words to words, that's it. I don't think this is the first time he is provoked. don't forget he played in Italy and meet Materazzi a lot of times so he knew him. Zidane knew Materazzi is a provoker he is not the first and will not be the last player who gets insults. The reaction just cannot be allowed. The red card was deserved, period.
0 Replies
 
Ellinas
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Jul, 2006 03:52 am
Raphillon wrote:
The red card was deserved, period.


I don't think there is someone who doubts this Rolling Eyes .
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Jul, 2006 04:04 am
I'm hearing the Italian Player applied a "Nipple cripple" earlier in the match.

FIFA should view video footage and apply a post match ban if this is proven.

We have post match video reviews of our football matches here. The application of appropriate penalties has toned down off the ball incidents as well as on the ball incidents that the ref misses. game results dont change but players are pealised by missing their next club matche(s).
0 Replies
 
nimh
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Jul, 2006 06:20 am
Was anyone else baffled by this defence of Materazzi's?

Quote:
"I did insult him, it's true," Materazzi said in Tuesday's edition of the Italian sports daily Gazzetta dello Sport.

"But I categorically did not call him a terrorist,"' he added. "I'm not cultured and I don't even know what an Islamic terrorist is."

Doesnt know what an Islamic terrorist is? What, he never heard of 9/11? Either thats a luridly unbelievable excuse, or, if its true - well, then its even more scary.
0 Replies
 
George
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Jul, 2006 06:30 am
Obviously ridiculous.
We have a vast horde of uncultured folks right here who go on for pages
and pages about Islamic terrorists.
0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Jul, 2006 06:41 am
Zidane will speak to the media this evening, I hear....

So we'll get to know what "sportsmen" say to each other during a game.
0 Replies
 
nimh
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Jul, 2006 06:42 am
George Laughing

---

John Vinocur in the Herald Tribune on Zidane, yesterday:

Quote:
It was going to be very tempting to say as he departed that the Beautifu Game had produced a Beautiful Man.

As a human being, hundreds of articles reported on his personal grace, his respect for everything insignificant, small or weak. He also took no crap: lean on Zidane, and he came back at you. Yellow cards, red cards, St. Zinedine protected his livelihoods, his wife and four sons. He knew the rules from growing up in Marseille. Sometimes you throw the first punch.

Working on story for the New York Times Magazine about him years ago, I found a person straining not to talk about prejudice or poverty or anything that could create discomfort or betray his judgements on people and the world. And certainly not about what shadow or voice of evil made him stomp on a fallen player from Saudi Arabia and get expelled from an early match in the '98 World Cup.

Deservedly thrown out of the last game of his career Sunday night for a dumb head butt, it's a guess to say a soccer career provided a safety valve for the inarticulated rage inhabiting a saint from the La Castellane housing projects.
0 Replies
 
Raphillon
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Jul, 2006 07:35 am
nimh wrote:
Was anyone else baffled by this defence of Materazzi's?

Quote:
"I did insult him, it's true," Materazzi said in Tuesday's edition of the Italian sports daily Gazzetta dello Sport.

"But I categorically did not call him a terrorist,"' he added. "I'm not cultured and I don't even know what an Islamic terrorist is."

Doesn't know what an Islamic terrorist is? What, he never heard of 9/11? Either thats a luridly unbelievable excuse, or, if its true - well, then its even more scary.


In Italian it sounds quite ironic what he really said is:

"Io sono un ignorante, manco so che รจ, un terrorista"

"I'm ignorant, I don't even know what a terrorist is"

Which sounds kind of ironic: obviously he does know what a terrorist is, but he claims this is not the kind of insult he would use, suggesting he said something more vulgar and less sophisticate.

I don't like people who pride their vulgarity Confused
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Jul, 2006 01:50 pm
You be Zidane
0 Replies
 
detano inipo
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Jul, 2006 04:52 pm
story
0 Replies
 
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Jul, 2006 06:18 pm
Good article detano, and I would like to point out the last paragraph,
as Zidane's history in football will prevail as one of the best and fairest
players, and no one will take that away from him.

Quote:
He walks into history rightly regarded as one of the sport's gentlemen. He may not have turned the other cheek, but nor did he dive or whine or fake injuries or give up or badmouth his opponents or blame others when the team did badly. He was also the game's greatest exponent of the past 20 years. Nothing that happened Sunday changed any of that.
0 Replies
 
detano inipo
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Jul, 2006 08:10 pm
Thanks CJ, I'm glad you're with me. It is so easy to condemn a player who loses his temper. He had a thousand reasons to retaliate. He did it openly and knowing the consequences.
The other player is known for his dirty tactics. Zidane is known for his brilliant play.
0 Replies
 
FreeDuck
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 Jul, 2006 01:01 pm
I also haven't changed my opinion of Zidane. He might have a history of retaliation, but he does not have a history of sneaky fouls, diving, whining, or anything else generally regarded as poor sportsmanlike. He is still my hero.
0 Replies
 
 

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