Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Nov, 2005 02:11 am
Lord Ellpus wrote:

But they make such a mess in the lounge.....


Why don't you nest them in the oven?
0 Replies
 
Phoenix32890
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Nov, 2005 05:57 am
Piffka wrote:
Phoenix - That sounds like a relaxing way to enjoy Thanksgiving and it is always nice to share with friends. Will you miss cooking a turkey?


Piffka- Believe it or not, I have NEVER cooked a turkey in all the years that I am married to my husband. Seems that he is allergic to fowl, as well as shellfish.
0 Replies
 
eoe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Nov, 2005 07:33 am
Piffka wrote:
eoe -- Your husband's cousin's house? Will the rest of the family be there, too? We do a lot of things with my husband's many cousins -- they're close in age and habits to us. It's good fun to hang out with them.


There will be tons of family, several generations of children from adults to a brand new baby, aunts, Godparents, it's always crowded and festive, cousin is a wonderful cook and we always have a wonderful time.
0 Replies
 
Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Nov, 2005 07:39 am
Walter Hinteler wrote:
Lord Ellpus wrote:
No, Piff...we don't have thanksgiving over here......


In sme British parishes they celebrate - like elsewhere in Europe - a "Harvest Thanksgiving" on a Sunday in late September or early October (German Catholics do it the first Sunday in October).


Thanks, Walter. I like the connection with a harvest, too.





See Lord El - you're just in the wrong parish.


<evil grin>

(Did you notice they only "do it" one Sunday a year, eh?... Wink)
0 Replies
 
Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Nov, 2005 07:50 am
Lord Ellpus wrote:
So.......if most of you have turkey for thanksgiving, what do you eat on Xmas day?


Turkey.

It is the silly season.


Seriously, on Xmas Eve we usually have a big party and for the last ten or so years it has featured tamales and other Mexican delights. My parents spent half the year in Mexico beginning in 1970, so I have a few connections to that country.

On Xmas Day, I try not to cook. I'm exhausted. Our big deal is Christmas breakfast and we have easy-on-the-cook made or bought ahead of time pastries, fresh juice, etc.

If I do get talked into cooking, sometimes I'll cook a small turkey and/or a small ham (and then we eat samiches 'til New Year's Eve).

Everything is changing for us this year since our kids will be working the holidays. Sad We may do something crazy like go to Arizona.
0 Replies
 
Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Nov, 2005 07:55 am
panzade wrote:
Wilma has me installing shingles and soffit ...


Shingles, soffits and flooring, oh my! Everywhere you turn there's a job, huh?

I would not be good at coping, Pan -- I become frustrated, then disgruntled, then ornery. I am sure you have a much better attitude.

Good luck with all your hard work.
0 Replies
 
Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Nov, 2005 08:04 am
ossobuco wrote:
My cousins, one family or the other of which we used to visit each year on C. eve, always served baked ham, and sandwich fixings... then we drove freeways home. Up again early C day to get on freeway for a hundred miles to my inlaws, dagnabthem. They made chicken and dumplings, or pot roast, lime jello with mustard and mayo...
don't mean to make fun, hard to shut up. (Hard for them to get to our house.)

Marriage sometimes means not getting your own turkey until a few days later...



So, does free range have better flavor or not?


Yes, they really do taste better and they're not much more expensive. But last night's was not a free range. It was an all-natural one from Dangerway. I don't like to pay for 8% liquid charged into the bird.

But, all that driving sounds... awful. In all my married years, we've never driven miles in every direction to get somewhere to be with relatives, though frequently we'd fly to Arizona to spend the holidays with his parents when they were still alive.

And once we flew to Missouri for Thanksgiving. A nice time once we got there (except for the ice storm) but never again! That was the absolute worst travel experience I've had. Crowded airport, crying kids everywhere, and stalled flights. Yuck. If I give anybody advice it is DO NOT FLY SOMEWHERE FOR THANKSGIVING. Stay home!

Osso -- by the way. Thanks for the link to Richard's recipe. I'll be checking it out later.
0 Replies
 
Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Nov, 2005 08:08 am
Walter Hinteler wrote:
Lord Ellpus wrote:

Free range and/or organic is by far the best choice.....if one can afford it.


That's true .... only due to bird flu precausions (and by law), all free range birds are now kept indoors (or at least should be kept indoors), here.


Poor birdies. I don't think those precautions have hit here yet, Walter. (I don't honestly know.) There is a farm within about twenty-five miles that raises most of the good free-range poultry people buy around here. Last year, the price per pound was about $1.25.
0 Replies
 
Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Nov, 2005 08:10 am
Phoenix32890 wrote:
Piffka wrote:
Phoenix - That sounds like a relaxing way to enjoy Thanksgiving and it is always nice to share with friends. Will you miss cooking a turkey?


Piffka- Believe it or not, I have NEVER cooked a turkey in all the years that I am married to my husband. Seems that he is allergic to fowl, as well as shellfish.


Phoenix! And you with such a name!!!

That is shocking, both fowl and shellfish. It is so good of you to make allowances for him. (Bummer though... no wonder you're making plans to go to a buffet! Wink
0 Replies
 
Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Nov, 2005 08:14 am
eoe wrote:
There will be tons of family, several generations of children from adults to a brand new baby, aunts, Godparents, it's always crowded and festive, cousin is a wonderful cook and we always have a wonderful time.


You are the lucky one, eoe. Those days are the best... if you can find enough family. When our kids were smaller we'd sometimes have big Thanksgiving parties with my three sisters and brother because our parents were gone. One set of in-law parental units would usually show up, for a multi-generational effect and there'd be several hangers-on who seemed to bask in the familial glow.

The kids had the most fun and the food seemed to be prepared by so many hands, it could hardly be called work.

(A new baby, too? Oooooooooooooooooo!!!!)
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Nov, 2005 11:37 am
Piffka wrote:
Good luck with all your hard work.


Thanks Piff. An "attaboy" from you is worth ten in the bush
0 Replies
 
Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Nov, 2005 12:44 pm
<smiling> Well, you know I'm a carpenter's wife, Panzade. I make the sandwiches, hold the dumb end of the tape and have seen how much effort it takes -- strength, knowledge and creativity.

I'm sure you do great work and your family is mightily pleased. (And I'll bet everyone is happy you don't have to manage a Thanksgiving feast in the midst of your project.)
0 Replies
 
gustavratzenhofer
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Nov, 2005 01:19 pm
This Thanksgiving, like a multitude of previous ones, I will be sitting alone, staring out the window. On my plate will be a simple peanut butter sandwich and perhaps one or two potato chips. I will absentmindedly nibble on one of the chips and push the uneaten sandwich around the plate. Then, I will walk outside, stare at the stars for a bit, let out a sigh, and go back inside.

The deafening silence will finally get to me and I will turn on the radio.

And I will weep.
0 Replies
 
Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Nov, 2005 01:22 pm
Sad .... and we will weep with you, Gustav.


Tears go so well with peanut butter and chips.
0 Replies
 
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Nov, 2005 03:52 pm
Frankly, I think gustav is a native Indian and doesn't
really celebrate Thanksgiving.
0 Replies
 
Dartagnan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Nov, 2005 04:12 pm
Gustav, at least wash that meal down with some hootch. Don't be all defeatist about this...There you go...
0 Replies
 
Aldistar
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Nov, 2005 05:27 pm
Piffka wrote:


Good luck to your mom, Aldistar.

I'm wondering... Watergate salad??? Is that Waldorf salad? Wink Good play on words, even if it's inadvertent! I'm going to start calling it that.


Thank you Piffka, her surgery should go just fine but it still has all of us on edge as she will be under for about 4 hours.

I think it might be the same dessert, I'm not sure. My grandmother used to make it all the time and I just recently acquired the recipe. I don't have it in front of me but I know it calls for pistachio pudding mix and is served chilled. I remember it having an excellent taste, so hopefully it will turn out.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Nov, 2005 06:55 pm
Since 2004 we have been helping in a community cooking project that provides dinners to families of those who cannot be part of this festival . Weve managed to grab another 3 families to help and all the churches and the firehouse kick in their kitchen.(2 insurance companies take on the insurance load) The entire tradition, only about 10 years old in our small community has a corporation structure now. We have a series of meetings this week about who does what. Ive been on the "Stuffing" duty and my next advance is to actually do turkey. I have a way to cook birds , which is high heat and relatively fast. This keeps em moist. I dont think the leaders of the group are ready for that yet.

I find that doing this at a dark time of year gives me more than I give it. Selfish, but, I get melancholy and think more about the less fortunate in the dark months.

Well do a bi5rd of our own but at the end of the weekend this year.
0 Replies
 
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Nov, 2005 07:18 pm
Well. Now my sister's family (hubby and two kids) have decided to join us for tday dinner. I told her what we'd discussed making an she wrinkled her nose to all of it. Here we go again.....
0 Replies
 
Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Nov, 2005 08:12 pm
CalamityJane wrote:
I think gustav is a native Indian and doesn't really celebrate Thanksgiving.


It was an Indian named Squanto who is credited with helping the Pilgrims. Maybe Gustav is part of the lost Patuxets?

Indian Country Today (Feb 2005)
Quote:
Which brings us to Thanksgiving, that most indigenous of American holidays. This coming Thanksgiving of 2005, we call on all American Indian nations, institutions, organizations and programs to sponsor the Great American Indian Thanksgiving Teach-Out. Let's take the opportunity to reach out to the American public - from New York to California, from Minnesota to New Mexico - with the most comprehensive, the most intense educational campaign ever launched on American Indian peoples, cultures and issues.



D'artagnan wrote:
Gustav, at least wash that meal down with some hootch. Don't be all defeatist about this...There you go...


D'a -- such sweet comfort. I hope Gustav is just joking around. I think it would be very hard to be alone at this time of year. As Farmerman says, dark thoughts come with the dark time.

Being that you are from WA, D'artagnan, I thought you might be interested in the Cave B Inn. I wish they had their Thanksgiving menu listed.
0 Replies
 
 

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