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"There's no dissent allowed in baseball"

 
 
PDiddie
 
Reply Thu 10 Apr, 2003 01:38 pm
Quote:
Stung by anti-war criticism from Tim Robbins and Susan Sarandon, the baseball Hall of Fame has canceled a 15th anniversary celebration of the film Bull Durham that was to feature the co-stars.

Hall president Dale Petroskey sent a letter to Robbins and Sarandon this week, saying the festivities April 26-27 at Cooperstown, N.Y., had been called off because of their remarks.

Petroskey, a former White House assistant press secretary under Ronald Reagan, said recent comments by the actors "ultimately could put our troops in even more danger."


From USA Today.com

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Type: Discussion • Score: 2 • Views: 2,074 • Replies: 17
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fbaezer
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 Apr, 2003 01:48 pm
Robbins signed his letter with a reference to an old World Series champion.

"Long live democracy, free speech and the '69 Mets — all improbable, glorious miracles that I have always believed in," he wrote.

GREAT!
0 Replies
 
blueveinedthrobber
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 Apr, 2003 01:56 pm
This is the slippery slope...we're on it...it is much easier not to get on than to get off once you start, unfortunately this is a lesson that we learn once it's too late most times....
0 Replies
 
Dartagnan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 Apr, 2003 02:40 pm
Honoring the stars of a baseball movie "ultimately could put our troops in even more danger"? This Petroskey sounds like a real intellect. Just the man we need safeguarding the sanctity of our national pastime!
0 Replies
 
fbaezer
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 Apr, 2003 03:55 pm
The slippery slope, yes.

"First they came for the Communists,
and I didn't speak up,
because I wasn't a Communist.
Then they came for the Jews,
and I didn't speak up,
because I wasn't a Jew.
Then they came for the Catholics,
and I didn't speak up,
because I was a Protestant.
Then they came for me,
and by that time there was no one
left to speak up for me."

Rev. Martin Niemoller, 1945
0 Replies
 
patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 Apr, 2003 04:19 pm
It's an argument that always puzzles me: "We've sent our troops to war, and your criticism of that war puts them in danger."

I thought it was the war that put them in danger?
0 Replies
 
Sofia
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 Apr, 2003 04:29 pm
Free speech about one's controversial ideas and views comes with consequences.

If one believes in what they say, they should be willing to accept the consequences.

Haven't any of you stood up for a principle that you had to pay a price for---at work----with friends----?

Do you know how many associates gave me the cold shoulder because spoke up when they said the word "nigger"? My supervisor told the joke, and trust me, I thought about giving a small smile and keeping my mouth shut... But, I didn't. And I paid for it. And, I'd do it again.

Talk is cheap. Let everyone stand behind their words.

Interesting aside... Did anyone hear a few days ago, that the Dixie Chicks now say Maines' comment was a 'joke'?
0 Replies
 
Wilso
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 Apr, 2003 05:43 pm
I feel ripped off. I thought this was a sport thread!!!
0 Replies
 
blueveinedthrobber
 
  1  
Reply Fri 11 Apr, 2003 07:14 am
Wilso, I'm afraid you're just another casualty of war in this case.
0 Replies
 
Wilso
 
  1  
Reply Fri 11 Apr, 2003 07:21 am
Of which there's been too many.
0 Replies
 
PDiddie
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Apr, 2003 08:55 am
Quote:
I'm not mad at Augusta National chairman Hootie Johnson for being a pigheaded boob in his refusal to admit women as members of the golf club that hosts the Masters Tournament. I'm mad at him for making me have to think about golf.

Dale Petroskey, though, the president of the Baseball Hall of Fame and a longtime Republican Party hack, I'm mad at for being a pigheaded boob.

Petroskey this week canceled a planned celebration of the 15th anniversary of the baseball flick "Bull Durham" because two of its stars, Tim Robbins and Susan Sarandon, have spoken out against the war in Iraq and President Bush. "In a free country such as ours, every American has the right to his or her own opinions, and to express them," Petroskey wrote in a letter to would-be participants quoted by the Associated Press. "Public figures, such as you, have platforms much larger than the average American's, which provides you an extraordinary opportunity to have your views heard -- and an equally large obligation to act and speak responsibly."

Translation: Hey, I believe in free speech as much as the next guy, as long as the person speaking agrees with me.


Salon.com
0 Replies
 
New Haven
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Apr, 2003 09:28 am
Do grown-up men really play baseball?
0 Replies
 
PDiddie
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Apr, 2003 09:51 am
Grown in terms of their physiology but most certainly juvenile as it relates to their psychological development.
0 Replies
 
bree
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Apr, 2003 10:57 am
Or as Roy Campanella said (using shorter words but making the same point):

"You gotta be a man to play baseball for a living, but you gotta have a lot of little boy in you, too."
0 Replies
 
anastasia
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Apr, 2003 01:32 pm
I think there are two things to think about here - the need of the American public to rally around something sacred, and the social need for public protests against issues that the public disapproves of. In this case, these two issues clash. I've heard so many of my "pacifist" friends say, "Well, now that we're IN the war, we need to support our boys" I think that attitude is crap. If everyone shut up about the war and didn't protest, the politicians could say, "See? People approve of the war." Do you REALLY want that to happen?

Sorry. <g> I HARDLY ever go off like that. But I think that what Petrosky did is silly. Just plain silly. <giggles> That's all.
0 Replies
 
Wilso
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Apr, 2003 02:33 am
anastasia wrote:
I think there are two things to think about here - the need of the American public to rally around something sacred, and the social need for public protests against issues that the public disapproves of. In this case, these two issues clash. I've heard so many of my "pacifist" friends say, "Well, now that we're IN the war, we need to support our boys" I think that attitude is crap. If everyone shut up about the war and didn't protest, the politicians could say, "See? People approve of the war." Do you REALLY want that to happen?

Sorry. <g> I HARDLY ever go off like that. But I think that what Petrosky did is silly. Just plain silly. <giggles> That's all.


I was really annoyed by seeing support for the war grow after it started. So many people are just mindless lemmings. Particularly in Oz which saw a big turnaround. I thought it was disgusting. But we've got so many morons here Rolling Eyes
0 Replies
 
CountZero
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Apr, 2003 02:24 pm
I don't care much for Mr. Petroskey or Ms. Sarandon or Mr. Robbins.
0 Replies
 
PDiddie
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Apr, 2003 08:56 am
Quote:
The opinion of the American public, in this day of omnipresent television and advertising, is swayed heavily by the manipulation of symbols. Karl Rove understands this and masterfully, in his Machiavellian manner, manipulates patriotic and cultural images to sway public thought.

The National Baseball Hall of Fame's cancellation of a long-scheduled "Bull Durham" festival was much more than an isolated impulsive act. It is highly unlikely that it was just an individual action taken by the Republican operative who serves as President of the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

No, Dale Petroskey, the Marvin Bush friend and former Reagan aide who summarily canceled the "Bull Durham" event, is not going to suddenly reschedule it. He has made that clear. All he has done, in response to the onslaught of negative fan response and hostile press, is say that he should have called Robbins and Sarandon before he turned his blistering pro-Bush propaganda letter to them over to the Associated Press.

Those of us who feel threatened by the encroachment of our freedoms owe it to our Constitution and to America not to let the Republicans steal another symbol of this great land, just as they have looted so many other American treasures for their own selfish purposes. Baseball belongs to the people, not to Bush-Reagan lackeys like Dale Petroskey.

Petroskey most likely did not act without the knowledge of at least some National Baseball Hall of Fame Board members, even though some press reports are saying that the Board is claiming Petroskey's decision was his alone. It's a little hard to believe that Petroskey, being a good Republican "yes" man, would just, without clearing it, write up an incendiary letter to Robbins and Sarandon, a few weeks before an event, release it to the press, and only THEN tell the Board.

That's not how Republicans operate.


Buzzflash
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