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i hate the word "aint"

 
 
Bella Dea
 
  1  
Reply Fri 11 Nov, 2005 04:04 pm
Setanta wrote:
How do you hat someone? Flog them with your fedora?


Laughing Laughing Laughing
0 Replies
 
loveislikearose3
 
  1  
Reply Fri 11 Nov, 2005 04:06 pm
hahaha
Setanta wrote:
How do you hat someone? Flog them with your fedora?


hahaha...
yeah ur the smartest one here setanta..
at least next time drew dad will think about criticizing other ppls writing..

0 Replies
 
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Fri 11 Nov, 2005 04:11 pm
DrewDad wrote:
"Ain't" is a great word. It should be added to the dictionary.

"Ya'll" is another one. And so is "fixin' to."

See ya'll later, I'm fixin' to click "submit."


'Ain't' certainly is in my dictionary, Webster's II New Revised (1984 edition). 'Y'all' is a regionalism, but I've noticed it's gotten more widespread in recent years. Used to be heard only south of the Mason/Dixon Line, now I hear it in Boston from time to time. And there ain't nothin' wrong with that.
0 Replies
 
oldandknew
 
  1  
Reply Fri 11 Nov, 2005 04:28 pm
What is more annoying is that the word AIN'T nearly always leads to a double negative.

There ain't no logic in it.........................
0 Replies
 
loveislikearose3
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Nov, 2005 07:33 pm
exactly
oldandknew wrote:
What is more annoying is that the word AIN'T nearly always leads to a double negative.

There ain't no logic in it.........................


yeah, exactly.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Dec, 2005 08:49 am
Setanta wrote:
The language used by the working class has often lagged behind that of the "ruling" class, because of illiteracy, and because for most of history, workers had little or no leisure to persue literacy.

Interesting story except that it isn't true. The language used by any dialect of English is perfectly grammatical. This notion, put forth by Setanta is a common one but it is simply wrong.




Therefore, the settlers in the "back country" of the American colonies spoke what was very nearly Elizabethan English, while the merchants and "gentlemen farmers" of the monied and propertied classes had intellectually and linguistically entered the Augustan age of English culture.

Another myth.

Quote:
"There's a town in Appalachia that speaks pure Elizabethan English."

There isn't. All languages, everywhere, are constantly changing. Some areas speak more conservative dialects, but we know of no case where people speak exactly as their ancestors spoke centuries ago.

Of course, ancient languages are sometimes revived; biblical Hebrew has been revived (with many modifications) in modern Israel; and there's a village in India in which Sanskrit is being taught as an everyday language. But these are conscious revivals of languages which have otherwise died out in everyday use, not survivals of living languages.

http://www.zompist.com/lang16.html#elizamyth



Additionally, verb conjugations were only loosely recognized--this can be seen among poor people in the United States in our times who may say "we was" rather than "we were." So "air" for "are" gets used in the singular and plural, and in all three persons.

Every speaker of every dialect conforms fastidiously to the rules of their dialect. Verb conjugations are part and parcel of those rules.


Quote:

Example 1: ain't
"an't (early Mod Eng [ænt]) for am (are is) not is apparently of late 17th-century origin; the variant ain't occurs about a century later... [at about this time, due to two sound changes in aren't, æ > a and loss of /r/, the two became homophones and got confused]. Now the form aren't I has gained ground among those who consider ain't a linguistic mortal sin. Although ain't has fallen victim to a series of schoolteachers' crusades, ... [it was frequently used at the time by very highly educated, cultivated people]... Despite its current reputation as a shibboleth of uneducated speech, ain't is still used by many cultivated speakers in informal circumstances."
(p. 203) [This would be me -- SG] [Especially the "cultivated" part]

http://www.uoregon.edu/~spike/ling290/badEnglish.html


0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Dec, 2005 08:51 am
oldandknew wrote:
What is more annoying is that the word AIN'T nearly always leads to a double negative.

There ain't no logic in it.........................


As with all language, given the right circumstances, what could possibly be wrong with that, O&N?
0 Replies
 
Sturgis
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Dec, 2005 08:58 am
I ain't never had no problem with the word ain't in certain situations. What? You ain't never felt a need to use the word and so it suddenly becomes something you ain't happy with? This ain't exactly a sensible way to approach it. If you sincerely ain't pleased with it I ain't a-gonna tell ya to go 'round using it but it ain't no big deal if some people do...in literature, day to day conversation and the such...adds a certain flavor and I ain't got an objection to that. Oh well, if you ain't gonna use the word no more it ain't no never-mind to me.
0 Replies
 
Director DJ
 
  1  
Reply Tue 27 Dec, 2005 12:06 pm
To summarise, does this mean that ain't (or ai'n't or airn't) is simply a dialectal synonym of aren't?
0 Replies
 
Chai
 
  1  
Reply Tue 27 Dec, 2005 12:21 pm
one of my favorite lines from "sling blade"

It ain't got no gas in it!





Man, that one has it all!
Ain't, double negatives, using got instead of have....

I'm fixin' to tell y'all thisun' here is a masterpiece of the 'merican lang-wich.
0 Replies
 
kickycan
 
  1  
Reply Tue 27 Dec, 2005 12:39 pm
Chai Tea wrote:
one of my favorite lines from "sling blade"

It ain't got no gas in it!





Man, that one has it all!
Ain't, double negatives, using got instead of have....

I'm fixin' to tell y'all thisun' here is a masterpiece of the 'merican lang-wich.


I love that movie.
0 Replies
 
Chai
 
  1  
Reply Tue 27 Dec, 2005 01:09 pm
poor 'lil feller.
0 Replies
 
nick17
 
  1  
Reply Fri 30 Dec, 2005 04:34 pm
Re: i hate the word "aint"
loveislikearose3 wrote:
i hate the word "aint"

how is it spelled anyways? with an apostrophe? a'int? or ain't? i think the second choice..
o well i dont care..

if i use the word its only like once a year.. either to mimic, or just for fun.. Very Happy

but othewise.. i hate the word


I dont like the word either. You used another word I particularly dislike anyways. Its anyway NO 'S'!!!

P.S. The apostraphe comes between the N and the T to replace the O
0 Replies
 
lmur
 
  1  
Reply Fri 30 Dec, 2005 04:40 pm
Re: i hate the word "aint"
nick17 wrote:
[
P.S. The apostraphe comes between the N and the T to replace the O



which spare "o" could then be used to replace the redundant "a"!

signed,
A.O'Pedant
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Jan, 2006 01:48 pm
Re: i hate the word "aint"
nick17 wrote:


I dont like the word either. You used another word I particularly dislike anyways. Its anyway NO 'S'!!!



What you like or dislike has nothing to do with what constitutes language, Nick. <ain't> is as much a part of language as <anyways>. That's just the ways things are.
0 Replies
 
Goldmund
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Jan, 2006 05:06 am
Dear friends,

It is a most instructive discussion. Smile

I have seen «ain't» in upper class British speech of the nineteenth century.

Kind regards, Smile

Goldmund
0 Replies
 
 

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