9
   

Any suggestions or strategies for the (Democrats) in this upcoming 2022 midterm election?

 
 
Real Music
 
  2  
Reply Tue 2 Aug, 2022 12:58 am
How Hispanic voters could prove critical in Midterm Elections.

Democrats and Republicans are both working to win the support of Hispanic voters ahead of the 2022 midterms as those votes could prove critical in key races. MSNBC’s Steve Kornacki discusses with author and political scientist Ruy Teixeira.


Published August 1, 2022

0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  -2  
Reply Tue 2 Aug, 2022 08:50 am
I think the provocations against Russia with Ukraine and China using Pelosi in Taiwan will make elections moot.

The oligarchs seem like they want to control the world *right now.*

They’ll put forward their new figurehead after they win these wars.

Yay Democrats. No voting necessary.
Real Music
 
  3  
Reply Tue 2 Aug, 2022 10:00 am
(Senator Cortez Masto) backs legislation aimed to lower rising energy costs.


Published August 1, 2022


Quote:
LAS VEGAS, Nev. (FOX5) - People across the US are seeing drastic increases in their electricity bills. Americans are expected to pay 20% more than last summer with many states seeing even bigger rate increases. Nevada is no exception.

Some NV Energy customers are reporting their bills are hundreds of dollars higher. Senator Catherine Cortez Masto says something needs to be done to bring costs down for families and is pushing new legislation.

“I don’t drive anymore. I just stay home. I order everything online... We cut back quite a bit on food and I am considering going to use food banks,” shared Maryann McLendon. McLendon, like many others has been surprised by their most recent electric bill. For a single-family home, the bill is projected to be $633 for July.

“Nevadans are absolutely feeling the crunch of high costs right now. I hear it from them in my office. I feel it from them when I am here at home and I am living it,” expressed Senator Cortez Masto who is now backing the Energy Consumer Protection Act. The proposal would give the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission power to go after bad actors: energy traders who manipulate the electricity and natural gas markets.

Under the new law, federal authorities could temporarily or permanently ban companies from trading in energy markets if they are caught manipulating prices.

According to government projections, significant increases in wholesale electricity prices will persist this summer.


https://www.fox5vegas.com/2022/08/02/cortez-masto-backs-legislation-aimed-lower-rising-energy-costs/
0 Replies
 
Real Music
 
  2  
Reply Tue 2 Aug, 2022 10:03 am
(Democrat) Senator Cortez Masto backs legislation aimed to lower rising energy costs.


Published August 2, 2022


0 Replies
 
Real Music
 
  2  
Reply Tue 2 Aug, 2022 05:10 pm
@Lash,
Quote:
I think the provocations against Russia with Ukraine and China using Pelosi in Taiwan will make elections moot.

The oligarchs seem like they want to control the world *right now.*

They’ll put forward their new figurehead after they win these wars.

Yay Democrats. No voting necessary.


1. I really don't know what are your views and opinions regarding Russia, Ukraine, China, and Taiwan.


2. For clarification:
Are you implying that voting in this (upcoming 2022 midterm election)
has no practical value, meaning, or relevance?


3. Just for the record:
I believe that voting in this (upcoming 2022 midterm election)
is EXTREMELY important for all sorts of reasons, issues, and topics.


4. Saving democracy in America probably being the biggest reason for me.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  0  
Reply Tue 2 Aug, 2022 05:16 pm
The Biden foreign policy scares the **** out of me, more than any president in my memory.
Frank Apisa
 
  2  
Reply Wed 3 Aug, 2022 03:26 am
@edgarblythe,
edgarblythe wrote:

The Biden foreign policy scares the **** out of me, more than any president in my memory.


Edgar's opinions, particularly on Biden, scare the **** out of me. They should, for a variety of reasons, scare the **** out of anyone who cares for our Republic.
0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 3 Aug, 2022 06:59 am
@edgarblythe,
edgarblythe wrote:

The Biden foreign policy scares the **** out of me, more than any president in my memory.

He’s pushed the country considered to rival us in military strength and a massive rogue country to the brink of war with us—needlessly.

Only a fool wouldn’t be concerned.
engineer
 
  5  
Reply Wed 3 Aug, 2022 07:28 am
@edgarblythe,
Appeasement has a strong, proven history of being terrible foreign policy. If the West had taken the same response to the Russian invasion of Crimea in 2014 as it did to the Ukrainian invasion in 2022, there would not have been a Ukrainian invasion. (There is plenty of evidence that Russia was clearly expecting to get the same response in 2022 as in 2014 and was really taken aback when that was not the case.) Pushing back against China's bogus claims in Taiwan and the South China Sea are pretty much the only way to check actions that could lead to much bigger conflicts in the future. (China still has a axe to grind with Japan, for example.) There are a lot of little players like Moldova, Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia and Georgia, out there who need to decide if they want to try to stay independent or if they need to summit to Russia domination because no one will help them. If Russia had walked unimpeded into Kiev or Taiwan was left hanging in the face of escalating Chinese pressure, the decision would have been obvious. As concerning as current world events are, there are far worse things that could happen if the US doesn't work to balance the scales.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Aug, 2022 07:45 am
@engineer,
Agreed.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  0  
Reply Wed 3 Aug, 2022 09:01 am
There is appeasement and then there is statesmanship. There is empire flexing global muscle and other nations resistance to empire. America has over 800 bases all over the world and spends its capital on war and weapons sales and engineers coups. You can't bully the rest of the world forever.
Frank Apisa
 
  3  
Reply Wed 3 Aug, 2022 09:06 am
@Lash,
Lash wrote:

edgarblythe wrote:

The Biden foreign policy scares the **** out of me, more than any president in my memory.

He’s pushed the country considered to rival us in military strength and a massive rogue country to the brink of war with us—needlessly.

Only a fool wouldn’t be concerned.


Lash's opinions, especially as concern's the Biden Administration, scare the **** out of me, too.

Only a fool would not be concerned that some people actually think like Lash and Edgar.
izzythepush
 
  5  
Reply Wed 3 Aug, 2022 09:12 am
@edgarblythe,
If Sweden and Finland were bullied into joining NATO, it wasn't America doing the bullying, it was Putin.
izzythepush
 
  4  
Reply Wed 3 Aug, 2022 11:33 am
@izzythepush,
I say this as someone opposed to the US bases on home soil.

I have been ever since Reagan used them to bomb Tripoli.

Having said that, there is a huge difference between bases on Democratic countries, and those ruled by an autocrat.

Pretty much all American bases on European soil are in democracies with consent.

Even Germany which was occupied values the protection of US forces.

The same can't be said of Russia.

Belarussians are not happy with Putin using their country to attack Ukraine. Lukashenko is quite unpopular.

Not all American bases are stationed in democracies. The Fifth fleet is stationed in Bahrain which is ruled by a king.

The king, and the ruling elite are Sunni Muslims, like the Saudis.

The majority population are Shia, and are more inclined to look to Iran.

There are parallels with Russia and Belarus.
0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  -2  
Reply Wed 3 Aug, 2022 06:05 pm
@Frank Apisa,
No content other than ad hom. You have nothing to say.
Real Music
 
  3  
Reply Wed 3 Aug, 2022 08:39 pm
@edgarblythe,
( The contents of the following article is what scares the living **** out of me)

(If the following doesn't motivate voters to vote in the upcoming 2022 midterm election, I don't know what in the hell else would)



Bills Targeting Local Officials Could Allow GOP to (Overturn) Election Results.


PUBLISHED April 24, 2021


Republicans in at least 14 states have introduced legislation that would seize power from election officials or limit their authority, apparently in response to unfounded attacks from former President Donald Trump and allies who sought to overturn his election loss.

Republican state legislators across the country have responded to Trump’s baseless election challenges, which were roundly rejected by dozens of judges, by rolling out more than 360 bills aimed at restricting voting access in nearly every state. But while much of the attention has focused on measures that would limit ballot access, like Georgia’s sweeping election bill, which Democrats have compared to Jim Crow-era restrictions, some of the proposals include provisions that would strip election officials of power and even impose criminal penalties for officials who defy the new restrictions.

Coverage of Georgia’s massive bill has largely focused on provisions that would restrict absentee ballot access and make it a crime to provide water or food to voters in long lines. But the bill also includes more insidious measures that could allow Republicans to give “themselves power to overturn election results,” Sylvia Albert, director of the voting and elections program at the nonpartisan voter advocacy group Common Cause, said in an interview with Salon.

For instance, the new law would allows the Republican-led state legislature to replace Georgia’s secretary of state — currently Brad Raffensperger, who pushed back on Trump’s efforts to overturn his defeat — as chair of the state elections board, and then fill a majority of the panel with their own appointees. The bill further allows the newly-appointed election board majority to suspend and temporarily replace local election officials and take over county election offices. County boards determine voter eligibility and certify election results, meaning the state board appointee would theoretically have the power to disqualify certain voters or to refuse to certify the results, according to the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law. The law also bars local election officials from sending unsolicited absentee ballot applications or accepting grant money that is used by some cash-strapped counties to run elections. Voting rights advocate Stacey Abrams decried the provision as an “unprecedented power grab” intended to “alter election outcomes.”

“This bill is a tragedy for democracy, and it is built on the lie of voter fraud,” Lauren Groh Wargo, who heads the Abrams-founded voter advocacy group Fair Fight Action, said in a press call last month. “It means that radical, right-wing legislators, if they don’t like how elections are being run … can wholesale replace those election administrators and put folks from the other side of the state in charge.”

It remains to be seen how this would work in practice. Some election experts have noted that there are guardrails that could prevent officials from overturning election results. The law limits such takeovers to four counties at a time and includes measures requiring the board to show multiple violations in at least two election cycles and a process that would drag out for at least 30 days. But it would be easy for the board to find multiple violations in “any county,” argued Marilyn Marks, the executive director of the nonpartisan Coalition for Good Governance.

The law could “absolutely” be used to overturn election results, Albert said, given the repeated attempts by Trump supporters, including many Georgia Republicans and even Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, to overturn the state’s results last year. “Politicians will look to use any avenue available to them to maintain power. Just because it might have a few steps doesn’t mean that they won’t do it or figure out ways to get around those steps.”

But it’s more likely this law would be used to “ensure that their suppression measures are successful,” Albert added. “What this is doing is saying, ‘Hey, we enacted suppressive state laws and we want to make sure no local election official actually attempts to help people overcome the burdens of those state laws.'”

Some of the provisions in the Georgia law appear directly aimed at heavily Black and Democratic Atlanta-area Fulton and DeKalb counties. Texas lawmakers have introduced their own sweeping set of proposed voting restrictions that similarly target Harris County, the state’s most populous, including the city of Houston, where Democratic officials expanded ballot access last year.

Texas Senate Bill 7 explicitly bans 24-hour early voting, drive-through voting, and the mailing of unsolicited absentee ballot applications, all of which were measures taken or attempted by Harris County officials last year. Texas House Bill 6 would make it a felony for election officials to mail pre-filled absentee ballot applications or even encourage eligible voters to cast ballots by mail or take any action to change election rules without the consent of the state’s Republican secretary of state.

While those two bills have already advanced in their respective chambers, a third proposal that is still pending would shift all power over voter registration and voter roll maintenance from county officials to the Republican secretary of state.

Republicans in Arizona also pushed a proposal that would have allowed the GOP-led legislature to overturn election results and appoint their own electors, though that effort was ultimately quashed. But the state legislature, which has introduced two dozen restrictive bills, is still looking at bills that would bar the secretary of state from sending unsolicited mail-in ballots and another proposal that would shift approval of the state’s election manual to the legislature.

“They don’t serve any purpose, except for the Legislature just trying to insert themselves into the process, create obstruction, and say that they did something in the name of election integrity without actually doing anything that does that,” Arizona Secretary of State Katie Hobbs, a Democrat, told The New York Times. “The Legislature wasn’t interested in control over elections until I got here and happened to have a ‘D’ by my name.”

Iowa Republicans have already passed a package of voting restrictions that include measures making it a felony for election officials to disobey any guidance from the Republican secretary of state and imposing $10,000 fines for any “technical infractions” of the state’s election laws. It also bars county officials from sending unsolicited absentee-ballot applications and restricts their ability to open satellite early-voting sites.

“This is a total takeover of elections by the state,” Linn County Auditor Joel Miller, who was among several local election officials in Iowa targeted by Trump and Republicans, told the Associated Press. “We did everything we could to increase participation and engagement in the democratic process, and evidently some people thought that more people participated than they wanted and they decided to put limitations on it.”

Arkansas Republicans have advanced bills that would give partisan county election boards total power over local election officials, move oversight of election law violations from county officials to the state election board, and ban officials from mailing unsolicited absentee-ballot applications. A pending proposal would also allow the state election board to take over local election offices.

Missouri lawmakers recently advanced a bill that would allow the secretary of state to audit and purge voters from any local election office’s voter rolls. The bill threatens to cut funding to noncompliant offices and restricts mail-in voting. Another pending proposal would impose misdemeanor penalties on election officials who failed to purge voters within 10 days of their death.

South Carolina Republicans have rolled out a bill that would give the state legislature more oversight over the members appointed to the state’s independent election commission.

An analysis by FiveThirtyEight identified 14 states with bills aimed at undermining election officials, including proposals to ban the mailing of unsolicited absentee-ballot applications in Michigan, Tennessee, Connecticut and South Dakota and bills restricting the mailing of absentee ballots in New Jersey, New York, Illinois and Wisconsin.

While the measures are not expected to get far in Democratic-led states — except in Michigan where Republican state lawmakers are plotting to subvert Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s vow to veto any voting restrictions — they are likely to advance in states where the GOP has attacked “election officials who did not support Trump’s lies,” Albert said.

Republicans have justified the proposals by arguing that election officials overreached in their efforts to expand mail-in voting amid the coronavirus pandemic and took “the law into their own hands” against the wishes of elected state lawmakers.

“It’s a bunch of BS,” Albert said in response to the Republican argument. “It is clearly an attempt to take power away not just from local election officials, but from Americans.” Republicans, she added, are effectively giving themselves “the power to eliminate democracy in elections … what they’re saying they want to do is take away the rights of Americans to elect their representatives.”

Some advocates have also warned that many of these measures are aimed at counties with quickly changing demographics after record turnout among voters of color in 2020.

“The part that I think is so concerning is the retaliation,” Myrna Pérez, director of the Voting Rights and Elections Program at the Brennan Center for Justice, told FiveThirtyEight. “Look at who on the ground would actually be impeded [by these laws]. That suggests to me a real opposition to an expanded electorate.”

Democrats have responded to the voting restrictions proposed in dozens of states by championing the For the People Act, also known as H.R. 1 and S. 1, a massive legislative package including voter protections, anti-corruption measures and other provisions. It is unlikely to pass in its current form unless Democrats can reform the filibuster and convince conservative Democrats like Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., and Kyrsten Sinema, D-Ariz., to back it. But while the bill could protect voters from some restrictions, it would do little to prevent partisan power grabs of local election powers.

That issue has been raised as the bill goes through the Senate, but “off the top of my head, I honestly don’t know what type of provision one would add to H.R. 1 that would address this,” Albert said.

Some members of the Congressional Black Caucus have urged Democrats to focus instead on passing the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act, which would restore the Voting Rights Act requirement for states with a history of racial discrimination to pre-clear any electoral changes with the Justice Department, which was scrapped by the Supreme Court in 2013.

Albert argued that there may be a legitimate way to address these attacks on local authorities through pre-clearance. “A strong argument could be made that changing the power of local election officials is definitely a change to election law that would have an effect on Black and brown communities,” she said.

Albert compared the Republican push to take over local election powers to authoritarian regimes in Russia and North Korea.

“America is one of the only democracies that does not have elections run by a nonpartisan government entity,” she said. “What you’re seeing right now is the danger of politicians running elections. We should all be very much on guard.”


https://truthout.org/articles/bills-targeting-local-officials-could-allow-gop-to-overturn-election-results/
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Aug, 2022 09:55 pm
@Real Music,
That's the other half of the equation, which is why I try to push for Democrats to do their jobs while they still can.
Real Music
 
  3  
Reply Wed 3 Aug, 2022 11:17 pm
@edgarblythe,
1. That is why it is EXTREMELY important for everyone to go vote in the upcoming 2022 midterm election.

2. In order for voting rights bill to be passed into law, the Dems would have to keep control of the House of Representatives and have a net pick up of two Senate seats.

3. If the Republicans win the House, there will be no voting rights bill passed into law.

4. If the Republicans win the Senate, there will be no voting rights bill passed into law.

5. If the democrats do keep control of the Senate (without) picking up two additional seats, there will be no voting rights bill, because Sinema and Manchin will not allow a filibuster carve-out exception for voting rights bill.
0 Replies
 
Frank Apisa
 
  2  
Reply Thu 4 Aug, 2022 03:10 am
@Lash,
Lash wrote:

No content other than ad hom. You have nothing to say.


If you want to help American conservatives to increase their power in America...you are free to do so by whatever means you choose. If I want to stop people who pretend to be progressive from helping American conservatives to increase their power in America...I am free to do so. And I can choose the methods I see as proper and proportional to do it.

Edgar has become a blight in this context...on this issue. YOU have always been a blight on them.

If what I am doing with regard to all this bothers you...great. That means I am being at least partially successful.
0 Replies
 
Real Music
 
  2  
Reply Fri 5 Aug, 2022 11:07 pm
Gas Prices Fall for the 7th Straight Week


Published August 1, 2022


Quote:
Gas prices continue to drop across the country from the historic highs they reached earlier this year.

AAA reports the national average for a gallon of gas on Monday fell to $4.21, down 14 cents since last week. GasBuddy reports the average is even lower, at $4.17.

California still clocked in with the highest average price, $5.60 a gallon, with the average in the Los Angeles area at $5.70 — still 17 cents cheaper than the previous week, AAA reported.

This week marks the seventh week in a row gas prices have fallen since the record high of $5.16 in mid-June this year.

With lower gas prices, however, demand could increase and end the drop in pump prices, AAA reported.

“We know that most American drivers have made significant changes in their driving habits to cope with high gas prices,” said AAA spokesperson Andrew Gross, AAA spokesperson in a release. “But with gas below $4 a gallon at nearly half of the gas stations around the country, it’s possible that gas demand could rise.”

Survey data from AAA found almost two-thirds (64%) of drivers changed their habits or lifestyle since March to cope with the higher prices. The top three changes reported were driving less, combining errands and reducing shopping or dining out.

GasBuddy, on the other hand, expects prices to keep dropping in the coming weeks, with one exception:

"The outlook is for a continued drop in most areas, however, some supply tightness in areas of the Northeastern U.S. could push prices up slightly until inventories rise, or imports do," Gas Buddy officials said in a release. "For now, Americans are seeing prices nearly 90 cents lower than their mid-June peak and are spending close to $330 million less on gasoline every day as a result. As long as oil prices hold at these levels or lower, we’ll see another decline in most areas this week."

This week's reported average, according to AAA, is 63 cents less than a month ago and $1.04 more than one year ago.


https://news.yahoo.com/gas-prices-fall-7th-straight-005555865.html
0 Replies
 
 

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