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Security Officials Blame Poor Intel for Failure to Blunt Capitol Attack

 
 
Reply Tue 23 Feb, 2021 02:45 pm
I watched the hearing today, I think it was a lot of bull crap and finger pointing. Also, brought way more questions than answers. I am still confused on why it took so long in between they finally called for the National Guard and the time it actually showed up.

I have a feeling there is going to be a lot more hearings regarding this issue of unprepared security at the capitol on 1-6-21 and perhaps this will be a good place to discuss it? I only hope it don't get derailed with unnecessary repeated down votes.

Security Officials Blame Poor Intel for Failure to Blunt Capitol Attack
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Type: Question • Score: 9 • Views: 1,754 • Replies: 48

 
revelette3
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Feb, 2021 08:52 pm
Quote:
'You can't just push send': 20 years after 9/11, FBI accused of intel failure before Capitol riot

An FBI intelligence report describing plans for violence was emailed the night before the Jan. 6 riot and never read by Capitol Police or D.C. leaders.

WASHINGTON — Nearly two decades after the failure to share intelligence helped prevent the FBI from foiling the 9/11 attacks, the bureau is now accused of not making sure local police agencies fully appreciated the threats brewing among militia groups and white supremacists in the days before the assault on the United States Capitol.

An FBI intelligence report describing plans for violence at the Capitol was sent via email to lower-level officials the night before the Jan. 6 riot, and was never read by Capitol Police or Washington, D.C. leaders, according to testimony at Tuesday's Senate hearing.

Senators called that "an intelligence breakdown" by both the Capitol Police and the FBI.

You can't just push send…and hope it gets to the right person," said Sen. Amy Klobuchar, the Minnesota Democrat who chairs the Committee on Rules and Administration.

The intelligence failure that left the Capitol and Washington, D.C. police forces unprepared for the mob that invaded the U.S. Capitol goes well beyond a single unread email from an FBI field office, current and former American officials and experts say. At issue, they say, is a hesitancy by the FBI and other agencies — born out of legitimate free speech concerns — to collect and disseminate intelligence based on the social media postings of domestic political actors.

"This should be a wake-up call for everyone that we have a major problem on our hands, because the intelligence was there," said Frank Figliuzzi, the former head of the FBI's counterintelligence division and a current NBC News analyst. "The whole system is broken in terms of what they can and can't look at.

For weeks leading up to Jan. 6, extremists said openly on social media that they planned to use violence to stop the Congressional certification of the presidential election, as NBC News and other organizations reported.

But the witnesses at Tuesday's hearing said they received no indication through formal intelligence channels — from the FBI and their own intelligence operations — that a storming of the Capitol was likely. Although a report from the FBI's Norfolk, Va., field office — the one sent by email the night before the riot — described social media threats of violence against the Capitol, top FBI officials never mentioned it or other threats in planning meetings, Acting Washington D.C. Police Chief Robert Contee said.

In a statement Tuesday evening, the FBI told NBC News that the Norfolk intelligence came from a message board thread and was “aspirational, with no specific and credible details.”

The FBI noted that it shared the information widely, posting it on a system known as the Law Enforcement Enterprise Portal (LEEP), which is available to law enforcement officers nationwide.

“The information supplied by Norfolk was discussed inside the Washington Office’s multi-agency Command Post, which was initiated on January 5” and included the Capitol Police, the statement said. “In accordance with our normal process, the FBI and our partners collected and shared available intelligence prior to the events of January 6.”

The statement did not respond to the criticism from lawmakers who said FBI officials should have personally briefed senior police officials on the intelligence.

Figliuzzi and other former FBI officials say FBI lawyers have long looked askance at intelligence reports based on the public utterances of domestic political actors, lest the bureau be accused of violating the Constitution's right to free speech. As NBC News has reported, the FBI and the Department of Homeland Security did not issue a joint intelligence bulletin in advance of the Jan. 6 Electoral College certification, though such bulletins are typically issued before major events. A bulletin wasn't issued in part over free speech concerns, officials said.



NBC
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revelette3
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Feb, 2021 10:53 am
Pentagon wades into political minefield in hunt for extremists

Quote:
The Pentagon is launching an unprecedented campaign to root out extremists in the ranks after dozens of military veterans took part in the Jan. 6 Capitol riot.

But confronting white nationalism and other far-right ideologies is proving to be a political minefield for an institution that prides itself on staying out of the nation’s partisan wars. There's a growing sense of anxiety within the Pentagon that this push could feed the perception that it is policing political thought, favoring one political party over another or muzzling free speech.

By the first week of April, all members of the military must take part in a highly unusual order from Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin, in which unit leaders will conduct a day-long “stand down” to discuss the threat of extremism and gather feedback from troops on the extent that racism and other hateful ideologies or anti-government sentiment have taken root in recent years.


The Pentagon has not yet disclosed all the training materials it is providing commanders, but that hasn't stopped lawmakers and right-wing commentators from accusing the Defense Department of initiating a witch hunt on behalf of the Biden administration to purge political opponents. While there is no evidence to support a politicization of this effort, there are concerns among the top brass and senior retired officers that it could backfire if the Pentagon doesn't clearly define exactly what "extremism" means.

The day-long event is one in a series of steps the Pentagon has initiated in recent weeks to try to get a handle on the problem. The military, which has been accused of a "haphazard" approach to weeding out extremists, is also assessing the extent to which the problem has permeated the ranks, and has begun a series of reviews to determine if new training or regulations are needed to screen out extremist elements.

But the order for all units to set aside a full day to address the threat of extremism and to hear from rank-and-file troops on what they are seeing or hearing is considered a major test case for how effectively the Pentagon can manage such a politically sensitive subject.

“It really matters how it’s done,” said Doyle Hodges, a retired Navy commander and former professor at the U.S. Naval Academy and Naval War College. “If it’s done correctly, it’s a way to educate the force about what the problem is and what it looks like. If it is done poorly, it is a way to make people feel persecuted on the basis of political views they hold.”

Some branches of the military have adopted their own initiatives. The Navy this week decided as part of the stand down that it will require all sailors to reaffirm the oath they took to the Constitution when they joined the service. The service also warned sailors in a separate video that “just by posting, retweeting, or liking an offensive post on social media — you could be participating in extremism."

Austin also issued a new video message warning of the “speed and pervasiveness with which extremist ideology can spread today, thanks to social media and the aggressive and organized and emboldened attitudes many of these hate groups and their sympathizers are now applying to their recruitment and to their operations.”

But as officials compile additional training materials to help guide these conversations and subsequent actions, senior military leaders acknowledge there is a risk of going too far, especially if the Pentagon is not specific about what constitutes extremism and prohibited behavior.

“How do you balance this? We don’t have all the answers on this right now,” Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. C.Q. Brown told reporters on Friday. “How do you define it? That’s been part of the conversation. Where does the line get drawn on the definition? We may all have different opinions about this. And this is part of the work we will do with the stand down and as we go forward.”

Others have pointed to previous crackdowns that went too far, such as when the Army was a primary target of a communist witch hunt by Sen. Joseph McCarthy in the 1950s that ultimately became a symbol of the federal government trampling individual rights.

“You can’t cross the line into political correctness,” said Roger Rosewall, a retired Army lieutenant colonel and intelligence officer who has written about the risk of damaging the military if the crackdown is not carried out surgically. “Then you are accusing them of thought crime. The risk is that current military leaders will be telling soldiers you may not believe this, that or the other thing."

"If you are in the military and you participated in the events of Jan. 6, then you and anyone who was there committed violent acts that really amounted to an attempted insurrection against the United States government and you violated your oath,” he added.




I hope various states consider such programs for the local police in their states. However it is a concern about going to too far which backfire with everybody, not just right wing extremist.
0 Replies
 
revelette3
 
  2  
Reply Wed 24 Feb, 2021 10:58 am
Judge rips Capitol rioter’s Trump defense
0 Replies
 
vikorr
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Feb, 2021 12:17 pm
@revelette3,
Quote:
“A clear lack of accurate and complete intelligence across several federal agencies contributed to this event, and not poor planning by the United States Capitol Police,”
Seems to me the Ex-Chief is saying:
"We never read or watched the news, didn't know about the conspiracy theories and how popular 'they stole the election' was. We didn't think about extremist ideology amongst believers. We didn't consider Trumps words in the leadup to 6 Jan"

Chief "Dang we didn't really consider this properly did we. Who do we
blame?'
2iC "What about the <agency>'
Chief "No, no, it'll be too easy for them to refocuse on us."
2iC "What if we spread the blame over several agencies?"
Chief "Great idea, that'll muddy the waters."
0 Replies
 
hightor
 
  3  
Reply Wed 24 Feb, 2021 12:27 pm
Really edifying: "It wasn't me that didn't do anything; it was someone else who didn't do anything."
0 Replies
 
revelette3
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Feb, 2021 01:27 pm
Capitol Riot Costs Will Exceed $30 Million, Official Tells Congress

Quote:
As staff members huddled inside, the inauguration platform they had been diligently assembling was wrecked: sound systems and photo equipment irreparably damaged or stolen, two lanterns designed and built by the eminent landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted in the late 19th century ripped from the ground, and blue paint tracked all over the stone balustrades and into the hallways. Inside, busts of former speakers of the House and a Chippewa statesman, a statue of Thomas Jefferson and paintings of James Madison and John Quincy Adams were coated in fire extinguisher and other chemicals, including yellow dye that could stain.


Quote:
“Our first duty to those is to make sure the objects that already exist in the House collection are cared for, best we can,” Ms. Elliott said in response to a question from Representative Katherine Clark, Democrat of Massachusetts. After that, she added, her staff would “take stock of what are the artifacts that tell the story of the people’s House right up through today.”

While some of the prized pieces in the House collection were saved by curatorial workers — including a silver inkstand dating to the early 1800s, the oldest object in the House — a handful of statues, busts and paintings were damaged. Most of the items are in hallways near the House chamber, and were largely damaged by chemical sprays
.

I honestly don't know how those rioters can live with themselves. I was reading the other day about a health care worker in Owensboro KY who was arrested in the last few days after giving an interview where she said she would do it again. I was ashamed to having been born in the same place.
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RABEL222
 
  2  
Reply Fri 26 Feb, 2021 06:51 pm
Everyone knows white supremeists arnt really dangerous. They talk rather loudly and threaten people but they don't really mean it. And lynching in the south are Al most nonexistent.wbich is why white cops dont shoot them like they do those dangerous blacks. A white conservative is a teddy bear clone, ask ollie.
0 Replies
 
revelette3
 
  2  
Reply Sat 27 Feb, 2021 09:46 am
F.B.I. Said to Have Singled Out Potential Assailant in Capitol Officer’s Death
0 Replies
 
revelette3
 
  2  
Reply Wed 3 Mar, 2021 08:07 am
I watched a good deal of the hearing yesterday with FBI director Christopher Wray yesterday. Came away with three thoughts. Confirmed for me there was not any fake Antifa dressed like Trump supporters, domestic terrorisms is a real and growing threat, and lastly, there was a huge intelligence failure because of not taking these online domestic terrorist seriously through the ranks. At least that is my thoughts on it.

Christopher Wray defends bureau’s preattack intelligence work, says domestic terrorism is ‘metastasizing’ with more diffuse motivations

Wray says the attack was an inspiration to other extremist. So I hope there is more a sense of urgency or at least efficiency in intelligence gather on domestic terrorism.

They did talk about the summer's riots in the streets after the killing of George Floyd. Basically the reason those riots are treated different than the capitol riot is because mostly the fires and destruction through the summer didn't involve federal buildings which means they fall into local authority.
0 Replies
 
revelette3
 
  3  
Reply Wed 3 Mar, 2021 09:59 am
I realize I am sort of alone here, but, maybe people are reading. In any event it is good place (in my opinion) to post information regarding the riot at the capitol.

Today they are talking to military officials. So far I am hearing the sort of optics defense.
engineer
 
  3  
Reply Wed 3 Mar, 2021 10:16 am
@revelette3,
We're reading along, please keep posting!
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  3  
Reply Wed 3 Mar, 2021 10:21 am
@revelette3,
You’re not alone.

I read what you post, it’s very informative.
roger
 
  3  
Reply Wed 3 Mar, 2021 10:29 am
@izzythepush,
So do I. She, engineer, and Walter are among the most reliable posters - we may not always share all viewpoints, but I vote for reliable every time.
0 Replies
 
hightor
 
  2  
Reply Wed 3 Mar, 2021 11:38 am
@revelette3,
I make a point of reading what you post, rev.

I just heard that there's some concern about violent far-right activity at the Capitol tomorrow, March 4. It's been discussed before but apparently intelligence has gotten some word about it. It's hard to think of anything stupider than the idea thank a bunch of beer-bellied creeps in masks carrying guns, clubs, and zip-ties are going to accomplish anything more than get themselves arrested.
0 Replies
 
revelette3
 
  3  
Reply Wed 3 Mar, 2021 02:31 pm
Thanks, I guess I was begging for reassurance. Embarrassed

They cut off the hearing to listen to the update on COVID. But no more than it was, there was a quite a bit to unpack. I'll look around various news sites to get News people's thoughts of today.
0 Replies
 
revelette3
 
  3  
Reply Wed 3 Mar, 2021 03:26 pm
Quote:
D.C. National Guard chief: Pentagon took 3 hours to greenlight troops during Capitol assault

WASHINGTON — The commanding general of the District of Columbia National Guard, told members of Congress Wednesday that he had troops ready to deploy immediately to the Capitol on Jan. 6, but it took more than three hours for the Defense Department to give the green light.

The commander, Maj. Gen. William J. Walker, added that military leaders — including the brother of ex-Trump national security adviser Michael Flynn — advised at one point during the afternoon that deploying troops would not be "good optics."

In his opening remarks before two Senate committees, Walker said that he received a “frantic call” from the chief of U.S. Capitol Police, Steven Sund, early that afternoon about the security perimeter of the Capitol being breached.

"Chief Sund, his voice cracking with emotion, indicated there was a dire emergency on Capitol Hill and he requested the immediate assistance of as many available guardsmen,” Walker said in his testimony at a joint hearing of two Senate committees: Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, and Rules and Administration.

Walker said he alerted the Army’s senior leadership about Sund's request immediately after their phone call.

“The approval for Chief Sund’s request would eventually come from the acting secretary of defense and be relayed to me by Army senior leaders at 5:08 p.m. — 3 hours and 19 minutes later,” he said.

Walker said that by then, they had already ordered Guard members onto buses to move to the Capitol, and at 5:20 p.m. — less than 20 minutes after the Guard finally received permission to deploy — troops arrived at the building.

Walker said “seconds mattered, minutes mattered” as events were unfolding. If he had been given the authorization to deploy the more than 150 troops sooner, he said: “I believe that number could have made a difference. We could have helped extend the perimeter and helped push back the crowd."

Also, unlike on Jan. 6, Walker testified that there was no delay in receiving authorization to deploy troops when the D.C. National Guard’s support was requested to handle demonstrations in downtown Washington last summer after the death of George Floyd.

Not 'good optics'
After his initial call with Walker, Sund then “passionately pleaded” with Pentagon officials to approve his request for the Guardsmen to come to the Capitol in a call at around 2:30 p.m. with senior Army leaders and the D.C. government and police, Walker said.

“The Army senior leaders said that it did not look good” and would not be "good optics,” Walker said, adding, “They further stated that it could incite the crowd.”

Walker said he was told then-Secretary of the Army Ryan McCarthy was meeting with then-acting Secretary of Defense Christopher Miller and they could not be on the call, but the senior military leaders who were on the call said it was their best advice not to have uniformed Guardsmen on the Capitol grounds.

Walker identified those senior leaders as Gen. Walter Piatt and Lt. Gen. Charles Flynn — the brother of Trump’s first national security adviser, who was pardoned by Trump after twice pleading guilty to lying to the FBI during the special counsel investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election and the Trump campaign.

Michael Flynn also reportedly advocated declaring martial law as part of an effort to overturn the election and promoted the QAnon conspiracy theory, which was supported by some of the rioters on Jan. 6.

Walker said he “was frustrated” by the military leaders' response. “I was just as stunned as everybody else on the call," he said.

Ultimately, once D.C. National Guard troops arrived that evening, they helped re-establish the security perimeter on the east side of the Capitol to allow for the joint session of Congress resume in counting the Electoral College votes, he said.

The other witnesses at the hearing were Melissa Smislova, who is performing the duties of the undersecretary in the Office of Intelligence and Analysis at the Department of Homeland Security; Jill Sanborn, assistant director of the FBI’s counterterrorism division; and Robert Salesses, who is performing the duties of the assistant secretary of defense focused on homeland defense and global security.

Salesses said in his opening remarks that Miller “ordered the full mobilization" of the D.C. National Guard at 3:04 p.m. ET to provide support and McCarthy then directed the Guard personnel to initiate full mobilization.


https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/congress/national-security-officials-testify-about-jan-6-attack-capitol-joint-n1259434

I doubt we'll ever know but I am beginning to agree with some that perhaps the whole thing was planned by Trump which is why he replaced leaders in the military there in his last weeks in office. Trump probably wanted his rioters to cause the military to be able to declare martial law and under that to be able to affect a coup.
0 Replies
 
revelette3
 
  3  
Reply Thu 4 Mar, 2021 04:50 pm
Why did the Pentagon lie about Mike Flynn's brother's role in the January 6 response?

0 Replies
 
revelette3
 
  3  
Reply Fri 5 Mar, 2021 08:25 am
Democratic Rep. Zoe Lofgren quietly releases massive social media report on GOP colleagues who voted to overturn the election

Quote:
"Like former President Trump, any elected Member of Congress who aided and abetted the insurrection or incited the attack seriously threatened our democratic government. They would have betrayed their oath of office and would be implicated in the same constitutional provision cited in the Article of Impeachment," Lofgren wrote in her foreword to the report. "That provision prohibits any person who has previously taken an oath as a member of Congress to support the Constitution but subsequently engaged in insurrection or rebellion from serving in Congress."

The report features a collection of social media posts and tweets that span dozens of pages from Arizona Rep. Paul Gosar where he urges supporters to "hold the line," days before what would become the Capitol insurrection. In another social media post included in the report, Gosar wrote that "sedition and treason for stealing votes is appropriate."

The report also captures numerous tweets where Gosar invoked @ali on Twitter, which was formerly the account used by Ali Alexander, a leader of the "Stop the Steal" group, who said in several Periscope livestream videos that he planned the rally that preceded the riot in conjunction with Gosar and two other congressional Republicans, Mo Brooks of Alabama and Andy Biggs of Arizona.

0 Replies
 
 

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