0
   

What are the limits of hospitality?

 
 
Reply Wed 20 Jan, 2021 03:07 pm
I'm asking because it sounded like we might be hosting my aunt. Something about her nursing home not being very cool right now (what with COVID stuff, it's not very fun for her). My aunt is okay, I guess, but I'm a bit unnerved about my dad saying "...for up to a month."

https://cis.org/Edwards/Biblical-Limits-Hospitality

Conservative Christians are always getting beaten up on how homophobic, transphobic, or whatever other phobic they are for not extending hospitality to every random person that knocks on your door, there are actual limits to what is considered being a gracious host.

The interesting thing is that they seldom practice what they preach for others to do, as was the case with Paul Watson making a petition for (former) leftist sweetheart J.K. Rowling to fulfill her duty that she tells others to do of housing all immigrants (since she has 18 spare bedrooms). I haven't heard of any news to the effect that this has been done. She has since been shamed for her trans comments.

https://americafirstpatriots.com/50k-people-sign-petition-demanding-j-k-rowling-allow-muslim-refugees-live-in-mansion/

Ben Franklin said "guests, like fish, begin to stink after three days." While I won't agree with a strict three day time limit, I do agree that there is possibly a time limitation. But I'm wondering what limits you would set for hospitality?

1. If someone is of the opposite political view as you, would you welcome them into your house? What if they tried to get family members to see things like a conservative or liberal, spouting propaganda?
2. If they are incontinent and urinate/defecate on the floor?
3. Supposing they have a different culture (often the term used as an excuse) but do things like murder people who are not like them. Is it xenophobic to not want to welcome a racist group of people who does ethnic cleansing in their own country?
4. If they are nosy and spy on family members?
5. If it's been several weeks and they show no sign of moving, and don't contribute anything that would make them worthwhile to stay (since helping with chores is a huge incentive to keep someone around an extended time)?
6. If they invite random people in (this happened in my last apartment, and I became so upset that I actually locked her out; she also burned food which I was supposed to clean up, and accused me of stealing her clothing when I put it on top of the washing machine)?
7. When you are actually afraid of your guest?

In terms of Biblical hospitality, they do talk about "entertaining angels unaware" so yes, pretty darn important. However, the Bible also talks in the story of Lot about the men in Sodom who wanted to... well, sodomize the guests he invited. If we were to be hospitable to everyone, there's a problem when guests make things inhospitable to other guests. So where does one draw the line?
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Question • Score: 0 • Views: 350 • Replies: 1
No top replies

 
maxdancona
 
  0  
Reply Wed 20 Jan, 2021 07:36 pm
@bulmabriefs144,
Why are you posting links to hate sites in a discussion of Christianity?

The Bible is pretty clear on the subject.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

Is The Bible Just a Good Book? - Question by anthony1312002
What Is Wrong With Christmas Customs? - Discussion by anthony1312002
Do Christian lives matter? - Discussion by gungasnake
Satan (a discussion) - Question by Smileyrius
"Thy kingdom come". What's that about? - Question by neologist
Where are all the churches in the mist of this? - Discussion by reasoning logic
No God in Christianity - Question by Cyracuz
 
  1. Forums
  2. » What are the limits of hospitality?
Copyright © 2021 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 05/08/2021 at 02:20:02