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Narcissistic personality disorder (NPD)

 
 
Reply Sun 19 Apr, 2020 09:38 pm
Quote:
Narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) is a personality disorder characterized by a long-term pattern of exaggerated feelings of self-importance, an excessive need for admiration, and a lack of empathy toward other people. People with NPD often spend much time thinking about achieving power and success, or on their appearance. Typically, they also take advantage of the people around them. Such narcissistic behavior typically begins by early adulthood, and occurs across a broad range of situations.

The causes of narcissistic personality disorder are unknown. The condition of NPD is included in the cluster B personality disorders in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). A diagnosis of NPD is made by a healthcare professional interviewing the person in question. The condition of NPD should be differentiated from mania and substance use disorder.

Treatments for narcissistic personality disorder have not been well studied. Therapy is difficult, because people with narcissistic personality disorder usually do not consider themselves to have a mental health problem. About one percent of people are believed to be affected with NPD at some point in their lives. It occurs more often in men than women, and typically affects younger as opposed to older people. The narcissistic personality was first described by the psychoanalyst Robert Waelder, in 1925; and the term narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) was coined by Heinz Kohut, in 1968.

Signs and symptoms

People with narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) are characterized by the personality traits of persistent grandiosity, an excessive need for admiration, and a personal disdain and lack of empathy for other people. As such, the person with NPD usually displays arrogance and a distorted sense of personal superiority, and seeks to establish abusive power and control over others. Self-confidence (a strong sense of self) is a personality trait different from the traits of narcissistic personality disorder; thus, people with NPD typically value themselves over others, to the extent of openly disregarding the wishes and feelings of anyone else, and expect to be treated as superior, regardless of their actual status or achievements. Socially, the person with narcissistic personality disorder usually exhibits a fragile ego (self-concept), intolerance of criticism, and a tendency to belittle other people, in order to validate his or her own superiority.

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5, 2013) indicates that a person with NPD possesses at least five of the following nine criteria, typically without possessing the commensurate personal qualities or accomplishments for which they demand respect and status:
-Grandiosity with expectations of superior treatment from other people
-Continually demeaning, bullying and belittling others
-Exploiting others to achieve personal gain
-Lack of empathy for the negative impact they have on the feelings, wishes, and needs of other people
-Fixation on fantasies of power, success, intelligence, attractiveness, etc.
-Self-perception of being unique, superior, and associated with high-status people and institutions
-Need for continual admiration from others
-Sense of entitlement to special treatment and to obedience from others
-Intense envy of others, and the belief that others are equally envious of them


Narcissistic personality disorder usually develops either in adolescence or in early adulthood; and it is common for children and adolescents to display personality traits that resemble NPD, but such occurrences are usually transient, and register below the clinical criteria for a formal diagnosis of NPD. True symptoms of NPD are pervasive, apparent in varied social situations, and are rigidly consistent over time. Severe symptoms of NPD can significantly impair the person's mental capabilities to develop meaningful human relationships, such as friendship, kinship, and marriage. Generally, the symptoms of NPD also impair the person's psychological abilities to function as a social animal, either at work, or at school, or within important societal settings. The DSM-5 indicates that, in order to qualify as symptoms of NPD, the person's manifested personality traits must substantially differ from the cultural norms of society.

Associated features

People with NPD exaggerate their skills, accomplishments, and their degree of intimacy with people they consider high-status. Such a sense of personal superiority may cause them to monopolize conversations, or to become impatient and disdainful when other persons talk about themselves.When wounded in the ego, either by a real or a perceived criticism, the narcissist's displays of anger can be disproportionate to the nature of the criticism suffered;but typically, the actions and responses of the NPD person are deliberate and calculated. Despite occasional flare-ups of personal insecurity, the inflated self-concept of the NPD person is primarily stable.

To the extent that people are pathologically narcissistic, the person with NPD can be a self-absorbed control freak who passes blame and is intolerant of contradictory views and opinions; is apathetic towards the emotional, mental, and psychological needs of other people; and is indifferent to the negative effects of his or her behaviors, whilst insisting that people should see him or her as an ideal person. To protect their fragile self-concept, narcissists use psycho-social strategies, such as the tendency to devalue and derogate and to insult and blame other people, usually with anger and hostility towards people's responses to the narcissist's anti-social conduct. Because their fragile egos are hypersensitive to perceived criticism or defeat, people with NPD are prone to feelings of shame, humiliation, and worthlessness over minor incidents of daily life and imagined, personal slights, and usually mask such feelings from people, either by way of feigned humility, or by socially isolating themselves, or by responding with outbursts of rage and defiance, or by seeking revenge. The merging of the inflated self-concept and the actual self is evident in the grandiosity component of narcissistic personality disorder; also inherent to that psychological process are the defense mechanisms of idealization and devaluation and of denial.

The DSM-5 indicates that: "Many highly successful individuals display personality traits that might be considered narcissistic. Only when these traits are inflexible, maladaptive, and persisting, and cause significant functional impairment or subjective distress, do they constitute narcissistic personality disorder." Given the high-function sociability associated with narcissism, some people with NPD might not view such a diagnosis as a functional impairment to their lives. Although overconfidence tends to make people with NPD very ambitious, such a mindset does not necessarily lead to professional high achievement and success, because they might be unwilling to compete, or refuse to take risks, in order to avoid failure or the appearance of failure. Moreover, the psychological inability to tolerate disagreement, contradiction, and criticism, and their apathy towards other people, make it difficult for persons with NPD to work cooperatively or to maintain long-term, professional relationships with superiors and colleagues.

Comorbidity

The occurrence of narcissistic personality disorder presents a high rate of comorbidity with other mental disorders. People with NPD are prone to bouts of psychological depression, often to the degree that meets the clinical criteria for a co-occurring depressive disorder. Moreover, the occurrence of NPD is further associated with the occurrence of bipolar disorder, of anorexia, and of substance use disorders, especially cocaine use disorder. In that vein, NPD also might be comorbid with the occurrence of other mental disorders, such as histrionic personality disorder, borderline personality disorder, antisocial personality disorder, or paranoid personality disorder.

Causes

The causes of narcissistic personality disorder are unknown. Researchers apply a biopsychosocial model of causation, whereby the occurrence and the expression of NPD – a pathological amplification of the traits of the narcissistic personality – are consequent to a combination of nature and nurture, of environmental and social, genetic and neurobiological factors.

Genetic

Narcissistic personality disorder is an inheritable psychological condition; research evidence indicates that a person is more likely to develop NPD if said personality disorder occurs in the medical history of his or her family.[ The results reported in A Twin Study of Personality Disorders (2000) indicate that the rate of occurrence of personality disorders in twins determined that there is a moderate-to-high likelihood of the heritability of NPD;and the research of The Genetic Epidemiology of Personality Disorders (2010) indicates that specific genes and genetic interactions (epistasis) contribute to the formation of NPD, and to the development of a narcissistic personality, yet how genetics influence the developmental and the physiologic processes underlying NPD remains undetermined.

Environment

Environmental and social factors also exert significant influence upon the onset of NPD in a person. In some people, pathological narcissism may develop from an impaired emotional attachment to the primary caregivers, usually the parents. That lack of psychological and emotional attachment to a parental figure can result in the child's perception of himself or herself as unimportant and unconnected to other people, usually family, community, and society. Typically, the child comes to believe that they have a personality defect that makes him or her an unvalued and unwanted person; in that vein, either overindulgent and permissive parenting or insensitive and over-controlling parenting are contributing factors towards the development of NPD in a child.

In Gabbard's Treatments of Psychiatric Disorders (2014), the following factors are identified as promoting the development of narcissistic personality disorder:
An oversensitive temperament (individual differences of behavior) at birth.
Excessive admiration that is never balanced with realistic criticism of the child.
Excessive praise for good behaviors, or excessive criticism for bad behaviors in childhood.
Overindulgence and overvaluation by parents, family, and peers.
Being praised by adults for perceived exceptional physical appearance or abilities.
Severe emotional abuse in childhood.
Unpredictable or unreliable care-giving by the parents.
Learning the behaviors of psychological manipulation from parents or peers.

Moreover, the research reported in "Modernity and Narcissistic Personality Disorders" (2014) indicates that cultural elements also influence the prevalence of NPD, because narcissistic personality traits more commonly occur in modern societies than in traditional societies.

Pathophysiology

Studies of the occurrence of narcissistic personality disorder (NPD), such as Gray Matter Abnormalities in Patients with Narcissistic Personality Disorder (2013) and Narcissists' Lack of Empathy Tied to Less Gray Matter (2016) identified structural abnormalities in the brains of people afflicted with NPD, specifically, a lesser volume of gray matter in the left, anterior insular cortex. The results of the study Brain Structure in Narcissistic Personality Disorder: A VBM and DTI Pilot Study (2015) associated the condition of NPD with a reduced volume of gray matter in the prefrontal cortex. The regions of the brain identified and studied – the insular cortex and the prefrontal cortex – are associated with the human emotions of empathy and compassion, and with the mental functions of cognition and emotional regulation. The neurologic findings of the studies indicate that narcissistic personality disorder is related to a compromised (damaged) capacity for emotional empathy and emotional regulation.

Diagnosis

DSM-5

The American Psychiatric Association's (APA) formulation, description, and definition of narcissistic personality disorder, as published in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Ed., Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR, 2000), was criticised by clinicians as inadequately describing the range and complexity of the personality disorder that is NPD. That the APA's formulation, description, and definition is excessively focused upon "the narcissistic individual's external, symptomatic, or social interpersonal patterns – at the expense of . . . internal complexity and individual suffering", which reduced the clinical utility of the NPD definition in the DSM-IV-TR.

In revising the diagnostic criteria for personality disorders, the work group for the list of "Personality and Personality Disorders" proposed the elimination of narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) as a distinct entry in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Ed. (DSM-5, 2013), and thus replaced a categorical approach to NPD with a dimensional approach, which is based upon the severity of the dysfunctional-personality-trait domains.Clinicians critical of the DSM-5 revision characterized the new diagnostic system as an "unwieldy conglomeration of disparate models that cannot happily coexist", which is of limited usefulness in clinical practice. Despite the reintroduction of the NPD entry, the APA's re-formulation, re-description, and re-definition of NPD, towards a dimensional view based upon personality traits, remains in the list of personality disorders of the DSM-5.

ICD-10

The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th Edition (ICD-10), of the World Health Organization (WHO), lists narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) under the category of "Other specific personality disorders". The ICD-10 requires that any personality-disorder diagnosis also meet and satisfy the General diagnostic criteria 2 used for determining that a person has a diagnosable personality disorder.

Subtypes of NPD

Although the DSM-5 indicates narcissistic personality disorder as a homogeneous syndrome, there is evidence of overt and covert subtypes in the expression of NPD. The study Narcissistic Personality Disorder: Diagnostic and Clinical Challenges (2015) indicates the existence of two subtypes of narcissism: (i) Grandiose narcissism, characterized by the personality traits of grandiosity, arrogance, and boldness; and (ii) Vulnerable narcissism, characterized by the personality traits of defensiveness and hypersensitivity. The research indicates that people with grandiose narcissism express behavior "through interpersonally exploitative acts, lack of empathy, intense envy, aggression, and exhibitionism."

In an inventory of the types of NPD, the psychiatrist Glen Gabbard described the "oblivious" subtype of narcissist as being a grandiose, arrogant, and thick-skinned person; and described the "narcissistic vulnerability" of the subtype of person who consciously exhibits the personality traits of helplessness and emotional emptiness, and of low self-esteem and shame, which usually are expressed as socially avoidant behavior in situations where the narcissist's self-presentation is impossible; therefore, they withdraw from situations wherein the needed or expected social approval is not given.Gabbard also described the "hypervigilant" subtype of narcissist whose feelings are easily hurt, has an oversensitive temperament, and ashamed; and described the "high-functioning" subtype of narcissist as a person less functionally impaired in the areas of life where narcissists with a severe expression of NPD usually have difficulties in functioning as a normally-socialized person.

In the study Disorders of Personality: DSM-IV-TM and Beyond (1996), Theodore Millon suggested five subtypes of narcissist; however, there are few, pure subtypes of narcissist. Morever, Millon's five subtypes of narcissist are not recognized in either the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders or in the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Narcissistic_personality_disorder
 
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Real Music
 
  7  
Reply Fri 8 May, 2020 10:45 am
Trump's first cabinet meeting turns into
an 'Amazing' Butt-Kissing Session.


0 Replies
 
maxdancona
 
  -2  
Reply Fri 8 May, 2020 10:50 am
@maxdancona,
maxdancona wrote:


The DSM is in fashion. The trend of people with no training making DSM diagnosis on each other is rather ridiculous. To be honest, I am skeptical that this diagnosis is even useful in a clinical setting (but then I am not a psychologist).

It is comforting to think that we can put other human beings in to nice neat little boxes. If I call my ex-spouse a Narcissist, it absolves me of any responsibility to the failure of the marriage (actually I decided my ex-spouse is a psychopath with OCD and borderline personally disorder after reading a couple of web pages.)

I am going to guess that everyone here thinks that either Obama or Trump has NPD (in spite of no one here having the training to make this diagnosis or the opportunity to sit with either man).

I think it is mostly bullshit.



I just got pulled back here and saw my thumb score. God damn! I think this is the best downthumb score I have gotten for any post.

I didn't think this one was even that provocative, I am just saying that non-pschyhologist making diagnoses on people they haven't even met is ... well I did call it "bullshit", but I have a point.

I thank you all for your votes. This will be difficult to beat.
livinglava
 
  -2  
Reply Thu 14 May, 2020 09:17 am
@maxdancona,
maxdancona wrote:

The DSM is in fashion. The trend of people with no training making DSM diagnosis on each other is rather ridiculous. To be honest, I am skeptical that this diagnosis is even useful in a clinical setting (but then I am not a psychologist).

It is comforting to think that we can put other human beings in to nice neat little boxes. If I call my ex-spouse a Narcissist, it absolves me of any responsibility to the failure of the marriage (actually I decided my ex-spouse is a psychopath with OCD and borderline personally disorder after reading a couple of web pages.)

I am going to guess that everyone here thinks that either Obama or Trump has NPD (in spite of no one here having the training to make this diagnosis or the opportunity to sit with either man).

I think it is mostly bullshit.

This is exactly right. Psychology is abused as a form of social power by self-serving individuals.

Michel Foucault wrote a lot about this kind of thing. There are some good videos on youtube explaining his perspective on psychology as a form of institutional power, like prisons and the military.

bobsal u1553115
 
  3  
Reply Thu 14 May, 2020 10:22 am
@livinglava,
I agree with you re: Michel Foucault. He is one of the most inciteful authorities I've ever read regarding power dynamics. And there is no doubt the DSM has been much abused by power elites.
livinglava
 
  -1  
Reply Thu 14 May, 2020 11:01 am
@bobsal u1553115,
bobsal u1553115 wrote:

I agree with you re: Michel Foucault. He is one of the most inciteful authorities I've ever read regarding power dynamics. And there is no doubt the DSM has been much abused by power elites.

I can't disagree with you here, but it just occurred to me that he was also somewhat of a narcissist, or maybe just an egotist . . . or maybe just a righteous person highly driven to preach a message he truly believed in.
bobsal u1553115
 
  3  
Reply Thu 14 May, 2020 11:22 am
@livinglava,
He had consistency. He was a socialist who supported a Socialist French government until they refused to condemn state terrorism in Poland against its own citizens. I respect small 's' socialists even though I am a capitalist myself.

It takes a certain amount of ego to pierce through stagnate, petrified old ideas, like Freudian psychology. To show new paths in the face of entrenched establishment authorities like those who tried to freeze the DSM in time and old outdated modes.

Both Trump and Obama had to have a certain amount of egotism to have the "vision thing". The trick is separating the vision from the individual and the individual being able to do the same.
livinglava
 
  -2  
Reply Thu 14 May, 2020 11:58 am
@bobsal u1553115,
bobsal u1553115 wrote:

He had consistency. He was a socialist who supported a Socialist French government until they refused to condemn state terrorism in Poland against its own citizens. I respect small 's' socialists even though I am a capitalist myself.

I don't really care what his politics are/were. He analyzed power correctly, at the micro level, which flies in face of collectivistic Marxian-type analyses that view everything in terms of collective/class conflict.

Quote:
It takes a certain amount of ego to pierce through stagnate, petrified old ideas, like Freudian psychology. To show new paths in the face of entrenched establishment authorities like those who tried to freeze the DSM in time and old outdated modes.

I don't think you understand the terms, 'ego,' and 'egotism,' correctly. Dissenting from others is not necessarily done out of egotism, though critics will always accuse dissidents of being egotistical as punishment for non-conformity.

Egotism is fundamentally socialist, because egotism/narcissism are about social-validation, i.e. wanting attention from others. Independent thought/action requires transcendence of ego, because if you get caught up in the pride of looking good socially or the shame of social criticism, you're going to fall back into the herd instead of rising above it.

Quote:
Both Trump and Obama had to have a certain amount of egotism to have the "vision thing". The trick is separating the vision from the individual and the individual being able to do the same.

I think you have the socialist POV that confuses conformity or other forms of social deference with altruism. Altruism is caring about the greater good, while conforming or deferring to social authority to satisfy others is just submission for the sake of your own ego.

Many people work hard to please or impress others not because they independently believe in what they're doing, but just because they want social validation. That is the egotism of wanting to be seen as good person but not ultimately caring enough about what is truly good to question what others validate or invalidate.
0 Replies
 
bobsal u1553115
 
  4  
Reply Fri 15 May, 2020 10:00 am
Where are the salad tongs?
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vikorr
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 May, 2020 06:20 pm
@maxdancona,
Quote:
I just got pulled back here and saw my thumb score. God damn! I think this is the best downthumb score I have gotten for any post.

I didn't think this one was even that provocative, I am just saying that non-pschyhologist making diagnoses on people they haven't even met is ... well I did call it "bullshit", but I have a point.

I thank you all for your votes.
No need to think so much of yourself Max Laughing ...you could after all have triggered just one of our many people that suffer from OCD or other distorders on this forum (said only somewhat in jest). I mean, if I were crazy enough, I'd go and create a heap of fake accounts just so I too, could vote down that many times...

...no, wait... Laughing
vikorr
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 May, 2020 06:26 pm
@vikorr,
By the way - I suspect that all these 'personality disorders' that are appearing in the last decade are just dreamed up by psychologists who have no other way to make a name for themselves, or want funding for their research (ie. want to be paid to study, rather than get a real job).

Some exist (eg OCD, Annorexia), but most of the 'newly discovered' ones seem rather suspect to me.....I mean, oppositional defiant disorder...seriously...

0 Replies
 
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