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Prostitution -- why is such a glorious profession illegal?

 
 
Chai
 
  1  
Reply Tue 27 Sep, 2005 10:35 am
Buying shoes is not having sex with someone other than your spouse with them unaware of the fact.

Let's not YOU be absurd.
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DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Tue 27 Sep, 2005 10:57 am
If it's a legal transaction, then it's a legal transaction.

I can buy shoes, transfer money, start smoking, go down to a bar or strip club and get sloshed, or even drive my car without changing the oil. It's all a private matter between me and my spouse. Even if I hide it.
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 27 Sep, 2005 11:14 am
I suppose, even donating some money for some church to help fallen angels would be such a private matter.
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goodfielder
 
  1  
Reply Wed 28 Sep, 2005 03:51 am
Of course prostitution should be legalised. Why the heck it was criminalised in the first place is a mystery to me. But like any other industry involving pubic health and safety it should be regulated.
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goodfielder
 
  1  
Reply Wed 28 Sep, 2005 03:54 am
Chai Tea wrote:
I agree MG.

Also, that old excuse men use that men go to prostitutes because their wifes/girlfriends won't do certain things?

balderdash.

Thinking of the women I've gotten to know really well over the years, I'm almost always more surprised at what they are willing and like to do more than what they won't do.


Then why do men go to prostitutes?
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material girl
 
  1  
Reply Wed 28 Sep, 2005 04:18 am
For hassle free sex.
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goodfielder
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 Sep, 2005 01:07 am
Right.
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 Sep, 2005 01:09 am
Actually, you can do it on the left, upsite down, etc as well ... if you pay for it :wink:
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goodfielder
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 Sep, 2005 02:08 am
1. The customer is always right.
2. The customer...

Never mind.
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phatsob
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Oct, 2005 06:19 am
prostitution
What is Illegal? ok... prostitution. But, How do you get around it? For instance, I hear it's only illegal to advertise for it. So if a woman suggests she'll give you some money after sex, does this mean you've still committed a crime? I appologize If it's somewhere kneck deep of the 7 pages, I read the first page, and wondered up this question.
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goodfielder
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Oct, 2005 06:20 am
Check with your local jurisdiction. The laws differ everywhere.
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nimh
 
  2  
Reply Wed 19 Oct, 2005 11:07 am
Quote:
RIGHTS: SEX WORKERS ASK TO BE SEEN AS WORKERS

Wednesday, 19 October 2005
by Stefania Bianchi

BRUSSELS (IPS) - A group of sex workers from across the European Union is demanding the same social rights as other employees, and calling for an end to "repressive policies" against prostitution.

Some 120 male and female sex workers from 23 countries met at the European Parliament Monday (Oct. 17) to urge the European Union (EU) to end discrimination against the sex industry.

"What we do is work and we want it recognised as that," Ruth Morgan Thomas, a Scottish sex worker and organiser of the conference told media representatives Monday (Oct. 17).

Under the auspices of the Italian Socialist member of the European Parliament (MEP) Vittorio Emanuele Agnoletto, sex workers from the International Committee on the Rights of Sex Workers in Europe (ICRSE) discussed labour issues, migration and human rights. The committee is a Dutch-based lobby group of current and former prostitutes.

"We organised this conference in response to the increasingly repressive legislative policies and practices across Europe against sex workers and the sex industry," said Morgan Thomas.

The sex workers say "repressive policies" on migration, public order and morality have led to the increasing vulnerability of sex workers. They insisted they were against all forms of human trafficking and exploitation.

"Anti-prostitution and anti-migration policies negatively affect the rights of sex workers, whereas increasing emphasis on citizen security, law and order and closing borders have impeded the growth of rights movements in general," they said in their statement.

Camille Cabral, representing French sex workers, said it was time to end the stigma associated with the sex industry. "You shouldn't hide yourselves, you shouldn't be ashamed," she said. "All societies should accept and give (the same) sort of statute to this profession as to any other."

The ICRSE says regulating the sector would curb exploitation and boost prostitutes' willingness to pay tax in return for rights and social protection.

"Many problems could be solved if sex workers were treated the same as any other labour issue," Ana Lopes, a British-based sex worker originally from Portugal told media representatives.

The cause of the sex workers is being championed by Agnolleto, who endorsed the sex workers' declaration. He says he will initiate a debate on the issue in the European Parliament.

"I believe this declaration is important not only for sexual workers, but it also could become very important for the European civil society," he said.

But a conference hosted by the European Women's Lobby (EWL), also at the European Parliament Monday, sought to develop policy and best practices against prostitution and trafficking in Europe.

"We oppose any move that would create the idea that sex work is normal work that your or my daughter would be ambitious enough to do when she's 17 or 18," said Mary McPhail, organiser of the conference.

McPhail argued that 98 percent of people involved in prostitution had become so engaged without any choice, and insisted that prostitution is fundamentally exploitative.

The EWL says the sex industry across Europe cannot be considered normal activity, because in many countries it is controlled by organised crime gangs.

"We do not agree with the definition of prostitution as sex work or as a profession," Colette De Troy from the European Women's Lobby told IPS Tuesday. She said promoting sex work as "normal" will not help solve problems such as trafficking and illegal immigration.

"We are convinced that policies should tackle the demand, which fuels the traffic, and measures should be provided to allow women, children, men or transgenders to exit prostitution," she added.

Prostitution is legal in some EU states and tolerated in most European countries. In the Netherlands and the Czech Republic prostitution is licensed and regulated by the state, but in many European states the sex industry flourishes in the black market where women are trafficked from poor countries to work as prostitutes. Their passports are often stolen to prevent their escape from sex slavery.

The increase in trafficking from Eastern Europe to the European Union over the last three years has made tackling it a priority on the agenda of the British presidency of the bloc. A new European Commission proposal on combating trafficking is expected Oct. 19.
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Oct, 2005 12:17 pm
Prostitutes here have some rights, however:

German prostitutes in rights plea
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hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Oct, 2005 01:01 pm
sign at the entrance to hamburg's famous (?) "herbertstrasse".
it reads "entrance forbidden to those under 18 and women" - nobody ever asked to see our identity card.

http://www.txmx.de/fotos_vol2/schmu_31/image/herbertstrasse.jpg
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Beena
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Nov, 2005 01:05 pm
I don't think prostitution is a glorious profession, but if someone wants to actually pursue it it should be legal to do so. Main problem with legalizing it is though - that women being the weaker sex may actually be persuaded or forced into it. That is not okay. I think with prostitution, the solution should be the same as what Chretien said about legalizing marijuana - 'Marijuana is not legalized, but if you're found in posession of small amounts of it, you can be fined and you won't get a criminal record.' This way since the harder and more dangerous drugs won't be asked to be legalized because marijuana itself is not, so people are safe. Same should be with the issue of prostitution.
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Bella Dea
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Nov, 2005 01:11 pm
So, if you have only a little solicited sex, you'd be ok?
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Beena
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Nov, 2005 01:15 pm
No, it would not be okay, but if you're found you pay a monetary fine only.
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dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Nov, 2005 01:24 pm
the weaker sex, interesting.
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Beena
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Nov, 2005 07:49 pm
Why dear? How else do you see the women compared to the men?
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Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Fri 2 Dec, 2005 03:47 pm
Might be the right place to post this:

"There was no association with ethnicity, social class, homosexual contact, or injecting drug use. Men who paid for sex were more likely to report 10 or more sexual partners in the previous 5 years; only a minority of their lifetime sexual partners (19.3%) were commercial. They were more likely to meet partners abroad and to report previous STI. Only 15% reported having had an HIV test.... The proportion of men who reported paying for heterosexual sex has increased, and these men have multiple commercial and non-commercial partners. Their higher rates of STI and low level of HIV testing suggest the need for prevention interventions for clients as well as sex workers."

Who pays for sex? An analysis of the increasing prevalence of female commercial sex contacts among men in Britain (PDF; 212 KB)
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