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Nancy Pelosi wants 'vote by mail' provisions in next U.S. coronavirus bill.

 
 
Reply Wed 1 Apr, 2020 11:45 pm
Nancy Pelosi wants 'vote by mail' provisions in next U.S. coronavirus bill.


Published April 1, 2020


Quote:
WASHINGTON — U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said on Wednesday she wants to virus-proof the November election by including funding to boost voting by mail in the next pandemic response plan being put together by Democrats in the House of Representatives.

Pelosi said at least $2 billion, and ideally $4 billion, was needed to enable voting by mail, to give citizens a safe way to vote during the coronavirus pandemic, which has killed more than 4,300 people across the United States.

She noted Democrats had gotten just $400 million for that purpose in the $2.3 trillion coronavirus stimulus bill President Donald Trump signed into law on Friday.

"Vote by mail is so important to ... our democracy so that people have access to voting and not be deterred, especially at this time, by the admonition to stay home," Pelosi told reporters on a conference call.

President Donald Trump told Fox News on Monday that voting by mail would hurt the Republican Party. Pelosi rejected that argument.

"When I was chair of the California Democratic Party many years ago, the Republicans always prevailed in the absentee ballots," she said. "They know how to do this."

Indeed, some Democrats fear voting by mail could disenfranchise minorities and low-income voters who tend to move more frequently or lack reliable access to mail service.

The $400 million in the most recent coronavirus bill is intended to help state and local officials bolster vote by mail and early voting, expand facilities and hire more poll workers.

But Democrats want more money to prepare states for a possible surge in voting by mail, noting the possibility the coronavirus pandemic could last into the fall, or flare again as millions of voters are set to choose the nation's next president on Nov. 3. Pelosi said more money for the Postal Service was also needed.

The coronavirus crisis has already upended the Democratic race to pick a challenger to face Trump.

Three states — Wyoming, Hawaii and Alaska — have scrapped in-person voting entirely for Democratic primaries on April 4, and will only permit voting by mail. Ohio and at least eight other states pushed their primaries back to May or June.

Democrats are putting together a fourth spending bill to battle the crisis, with a heavy emphasis on infrastructure spending. Trump says he is interested in rebuilding U.S. infrastructure, but other Republicans have shown little interest in doing another large spending bill.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/pelosi-wants-vote-by-mail-provisions-in-next-us-coronavirus-bill/ar-BB122a7u?ocid=UE13DHP
 
coldjoint
 
  -2  
Reply Fri 3 Apr, 2020 08:45 pm
@Real Music,
Of course she does. There is no easier way to commit voter fraud. It could not be more obvious. We should realize these people know they will not get elected unless they can cheat. Why should we help them?
Real Music
 
  3  
Reply Fri 3 Apr, 2020 09:35 pm
Senator says outside pressure will move GOP toward expanding ballot access during coronavirus pandemic.


Published April 3, 2020


Quote:
WASHINGTON — A Democratic senator who’s been pushing the country to prepare for the difficulties of holding a presidential election during an ongoing pandemic said he hopes pressure from outside Washington will convince Republicans to embrace expanding early voting and mail-in balloting.

“We’re going to see more and more Republicans at the state and local level, I think, start breaking from [Senate Majority Leader] Mitch McConnell, who by and large has resisted virtually all ideas that help expand the franchise,” said Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., in an interview.

“I hope that we’re going to start seeing more of a disconnect between Republicans at the state and local level [and national Republicans], and we already are,” Wyden said on “The Long Game,” a Yahoo News podcast.

Wyden pointed to Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan, a Republican who pushed his state’s primary back and is weighing whether to go to an all-mail primary on June 2, a decision he’ll make in the coming days, a spokesman told Yahoo News.

It’s noteworthy that Hogan has received entreaties from Maryland Democratic leaders who want to preserve some form of in-person voting “for a limited number of our citizens.”

Maryland Senate President William C. Ferguson and House Speaker Adrienne Jones, both Democrats, wrote Hogan a letter Tuesday noting that “minority voters are less likely to vote by mail, and … transient and low-income populations are less likely to participate or even receive ballots.”

Yet Republican leaders in Washington view the Democratic proposals to expand ballot access as political schemes, even though the election this fall will occur at a time when many public health experts — including the president’s own advisers — expect a second wave of infections.

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., on Wednesday described efforts to expand early voting and vote-by-mail as “partisan objectives,” lumping them in with other issues he claimed “have nothing to do with our war against the disease.”

It may be true that planning for the fall election will not defeat the coronavirus, but it is a way of responding to it. The Congressional Budget Office issued projections on Thursday that “included the possibility of later outbreaks of the virus” and said that in such a scenario “social distancing was projected to diminish by only three-quarters, on average, during the second half of the year.”

The rescue package signed into law a week ago included $400 million to help states prepare for a fall election that would see more ballots cast by mail, and for expanded early voting.

Wyden called that “progress” but said there is “a long, long way to go.”

House Democrats proposed $4 billion for the fall elections, and another proposal by Wyden and Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., was pegged at $2 billion, he said. That figure matches a cost estimate by the Brennan Center for Justice, a nonprofit advocacy group at New York University.

President Trump, however, has dismissed the Democratic proposals in terms similar to McCarthy’s but also let slip that expanding access to voting in the fall would work to the advantage of Democrats. “If you ever agreed to it, you’d never have a Republican elected in this country again,” Trump said this week.

And a top Georgia Republican, House Speaker David Ralston, said this week that it would be “extremely devastating to Republicans and conservatives in Georgia” to mail ballots to every voter, as the secretary of state plans to do for the primary election.


“Every registered voter is going to get one of these,” Ralston said. “This will certainly drive up turnout.”


Still, Wyden said “it’s pretty hard … to argue this was somehow partisan,” referring to his push for more mail-in and early voting. But money for states to prepare will have to come from Congress, where Republicans control the Senate.

Wyden said he is optimistic that actions and statements by Republican governors, as well as election officials across the country, will push Washington Republicans to work with Democrats on ways to prepare for the fall election.

“Political change is grassroots up,” Wyden said. “At the grassroots level, those officials at the state and local level are increasingly going to start saying,


‘There is no Plan B for elections this year’ if their communities don’t have the vote-by-mail option.”



“It seems to me that if we’re looking at the worst-case analysis for the fall, the choice may well be either voting by mail or not voting at all,” he said.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/elections-2020/senator-says-outside-pressure-will-move-gop-toward-expanding-ballot-access-during-coronavirus-pandemic/ar-BB127hCC?ocid=UE13DHP
livinglava
 
  -2  
Reply Thu 9 Apr, 2020 08:20 am
@coldjoint,
coldjoint wrote:

Of course she does. There is no easier way to commit voter fraud. It could not be more obvious. We should realize these people know they will not get elected unless they can cheat. Why should we help them?

Probably the reason why they are willing to cheat or doing anything else to win elections at any cost is because they believe the stakes to be so dire.

They are so terrified by the specter of the Great Depression that they simply cannot imagine the possibility that anything less than a Democrat-controlled government can protect them from everything they fear can and will go on within a Republican governance paradigm.

Now ask yourself where all that fear is coming from . . .
revelette3
 
  2  
Reply Thu 9 Apr, 2020 12:07 pm
@Real Music,
Quote:
Senator says outside pressure will move GOP toward expanding ballot access during coronavirus pandemic.


I agree, even republicans care about their safety and health.
0 Replies
 
neptuneblue
 
  3  
Reply Thu 9 Apr, 2020 12:30 pm
@livinglava,
livinglava wrote:
Probably the reason why they are willing to cheat or doing anything else to win elections at any cost is because they believe the stakes to be so dire.

They are so terrified by the specter of the Great Depression that they simply cannot imagine the possibility that anything less than a Democrat-controlled government can protect them from everything they fear can and will go on within a Republican governance paradigm.

Now ask yourself where all that fear is coming from . . .


Top Trump adviser: Republicans have 'always' relied on voter suppression
@Joannawalters13
Published onSat 21 Dec 2019 12.56 EST
2,544
One of Donald Trump’s top re-election advisers told influential Republicans in swing state Wisconsin that the party has “traditionally” relied on voter suppression to compete in battleground states, according to an audio recording of a private event. The adviser said later that his remarks referred to frequent and false accusations that Republicans employ such tactics.

But the report emerged just days after news that a conservative group is forcing Wisconsin to purge upwards of 230,000 people from state voter rolls more than a year earlier than planned, a move that would disproportionately affect Democrats before the 2020 election.

And it came as the latest fund-raising totals showed that the Republican National Committee, spurred by aggressive anti-impeachment fundraising, heads into 2020 with more than seven times as much cash on hand as the Democratic National Committee – $63m for the RNC against $8.3m for the DNC, according to FEC filings, Axios reported.

Justin Clark, a senior political adviser and senior counsel to Trump’s re-election campaign, made the remarks about voter suppression on 21 November as part of a wide-ranging discussion about strategies in the 2020 campaign, including more aggressive use of monitoring of polling places on election day in November 2020.

“Traditionally it’s always been Republicans suppressing votes in places,” Clark said at the event. “Let’s start protecting our voters. We know where they are ... Let’s start playing offense a little bit. That’s what you’re going to see in 2020. It’s going to be a much bigger program, a much more aggressive program, a much better-funded program.”

Asked about the remarks, by the Associated Press, which obtained the audio recording, Clark said he was referring to false accusations that the Republican party engages in voter suppression.

“As should be clear from the context of my remarks, my point was that Republicans historically have been falsely accused of voter suppression and that it is time we stood up to defend our own voters,” Clark said. “Neither I nor anyone I know or work with would condone anyone’s vote being threatened or diluted and our efforts will be focused on preventing just that.”

Clark made the comments on the audio file in a meeting of the Republican National Lawyers Association’s Wisconsin chapter. Attendees included the state Senate’s top Republican, Scott Fitzgerald, along with the executive director of the Wisconsin Republican party.

Audio of the event at a country club in Madison obtained by the liberal group American Bridge was provided to AP by One Wisconsin Now, a Madison-based liberal advocacy group.

The roughly 20-minute audio offers an insider’s glimpse of Trump’s re-election strategy, showing the campaign focusing on voting locations in Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania, which form the the so-called “blue wall” of traditional Democratic strength that Trump broke through to win in 2016.

Republican officials publicly signaled plans to step up their Election Day monitoring after a judge in 2018 lifted a consent decree in place since 1982 that barred the Republican National Committee from voter verification and other “ballot security” efforts. Critics have argued the tactics amount to voter intimidation.

Across America, as it heads into this crucial election year, while some states have enacted policies that make it easier to cast a ballot, many have gone in the opposite direction.

In 2016, Wisconsin had 62 paid Trump staff working to get out the vote; in 2020, it will increase to around 100, Clark said.

Trump supports the effort, Clark said in the audio recording.

“We’ve all seen the tweets about voter fraud, blah, blah, blah,” Clark said. “Every time we’re in with him, he asks what are we doing about voter fraud? What are we doing about voter fraud?’ The point is he’s committed to this, he believes in it and he will do whatever it takes to make sure it’s successful.”

Clark said Trump’s campaign plans to focus on rural areas around mid-size cities like Eau Claire and Green Bay, areas he says where Democrats “cheat”. He did not explain what he meant by cheating and did not provide any examples.

There is no evidence of widespread voter fraud in Wisconsin.

The dispute about purging voters is the latest in a series of voting rights brawls in Wisconsin, considered one of the most important states in the upcoming presidential election. In recent years, Republicans drew electoral districts that severely benefitted their party, unsuccessfully tried to limit early voting, and implemented a strict voter ID law. The law discouraged as many as 23,252 people in the state from casting a ballot in 2016, one estimate found.

“If there’s bad behavior on the part of one side or the other to prevent people from voting, this is bad for our democracy,” Wisconsin Democratic Gov. Tony Evers said in reaction to Clark’s comments.

Wisconsin’s attorney general, Democrat Josh Kaul, represented the Democratic National Committee in a 2016 New Jersey lawsuit that argued the GOP was coordinating with Trump to intimidate voters. Kaul argued then that Trump’s campaign “repeatedly encouraged his supporters to engage in vigilante efforts” in the guise of ferreting out potential voter fraud. The Republican party disputed any coordination.

Mike Browne, deputy director of One Wisconsin Now, said Clark’s comments suggest the Trump campaign plans “underhanded tactics” for 2020.

Earlier this week Georgia proceeded with a mass purge of 300,000-plus voters from the rolls, despite an activist group founded by rising-star Democrat Stacey Abrams asking a court to halt the plan.

Voter suppression as a tactic – from strict ID laws to closing polling places to purging voter rolls – is deliberately making it hard for minority communities in America, which traditionally lean towards the Democratic party, to exercise their right to vote, a Guardian’s ongoing The Fight to Vote special series found.
0 Replies
 
 

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