4
   

What will the Democratic Party primaries look like (after) Super Tuesday?

 
 
Reply Mon 24 Feb, 2020 10:32 am
The 2020 Democratic Party presidential primaries and caucuses calendar.


The following primary and caucus dates have been scheduled by state statutes or state party decisions, but are subject to change pending legislation, state party delegate selection plans, or the decisions of state secretaries of state:

February 3: Iowa caucuses

February 11: New Hampshire primary

February 22: Nevada caucuses

February 29: South Carolina primary

March 3: Super Tuesday (Alabama, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, and Virginia primaries); Democrats Abroad party-run primary for expatriates features a March 3–10 voting period.

March 10: Idaho, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Ohio, and Washington primaries; North Dakota firehouse caucuses (identical to a party-run primary)

March 17: Arizona, Florida and Illinois primaries

March 24: Georgia primary

March 29: Puerto Rico primary (Currently scheduled for June 7 but expected to be held to March 29)

April 4: Alaska, Hawaii, and Louisiana primaries

April 7: Wisconsin primary

April 28: Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, New York (Currently scheduled for February 4 but expected to be held on April 28), Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island primaries

May 2: Kansas primary

May 5: Indiana primary

May 12: Nebraska and West Virginia primaries

May 19: Kentucky and Oregon primaries (Oregon legislature considering move to March 3 or 10)

June 2: Montana, New Jersey, New Mexico, and South Dakota primaries

June 16: District of Columbia primary (bill proposing a move to June 2 has been tabled)


As of June 2019, primaries and caucuses for the following states/territories are not yet scheduled:

American Samoa caucuses (previously held on March 1, 2016)
Northern Mariana Islands caucuses (previously held on March 12, 2016)
Wyoming caucuses (previously held on April 9, 2016): The state party initially via its draft plan proposed a party-run caucus for March 2020, then shortly considered moving it to April 18, but may have the option of replacing it with a party-run primary (as a government-run primary is not an option in the state). The final decision setting the format and date will be communicated via an updated plan in the summer of 2019.
Guam caucuses (previously held on May 7, 2016)
United States Virgin Islands caucuses (previously held on June 4, 2016)

The 57 states, districts, territories, or other constituencies with elections of pledged delegates to decide the Democratic presidential nominee, currently plan to hold the first major determining step for these elections via 49 primaries and 6 caucuses (Iowa, Nevada and four territories), while two states (Wyoming and Maine) have not yet decided their election format - as their state parties currently consider approving last minute changes to their earlier drafted state delegate selection plans. The number of states holding caucuses decreased from 14 in the 2016 nomination process to so far only two in 2020.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2020_Democratic_Party_presidential_primaries



1. What will the Democratic Party primaries look like (after) Super Tuesday?
 
Real Music
 
  2  
Reply Mon 24 Feb, 2020 11:08 am
1. The 2020 Super Tuesday primary elections fall on March 3 and encompass 14 states.

2. It's the biggest contest for competing Democrats seeking their party's presidential nomination.



Published February 18, 2020

0 Replies
 
Real Music
 
  3  
Reply Tue 3 Mar, 2020 10:54 pm
1. So far, it looks like Super Tuesday is turning out to be super for Joe Biden.

2. It looks like Joe Biden is having a great Super Tuesday.

3. The 2020 Democratic primary has now become a two man race between Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders.

4. What will Bloomberg and Warren do?
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  3  
Reply Tue 3 Mar, 2020 10:57 pm
Warren has said that she's in it until the end. I hope that's true, and I hope she gets the financial support she needs. We don't need more old, white dudes.
Real Music
 
  3  
Reply Tue 3 Mar, 2020 11:10 pm
@Setanta,
Quote:
Warren has said that she's in it until the end. I hope that's true, and I hope she gets the financial support she needs. We don't need more old, white dudes.

1. I know there is no guarantee to who will win the nomination.

2. I truly genuinely hope and pray that Joe Biden wins the nomination.

3. Biden is clearly my favorite candidate.
oralloy
 
  0  
Reply Wed 4 Mar, 2020 03:49 am
@Real Music,
How often does someone win the nomination without coming first or second in New Hampshire?

And when it happens, how extraordinary are the circumstances?
Real Music
 
  3  
Reply Wed 4 Mar, 2020 08:56 am
@oralloy,
Quote:
How often does someone win the nomination without coming first or second in New Hampshire?

1. I don't know the answer to your question.

2. How often has anyone failing to come first or second in New Hampshire has ever come close to having the type of Super Tuesday that Biden has had?

3. This all just may be uncharted territory and possibly never seen before.



Quote:
And when it happens, how extraordinary are the circumstances?

1. Considering what Biden fail to do in Iowa, New Hampshire, and Nevada makes what Biden did on Super Tuesday extraordinary.
jespah
 
  2  
Reply Wed 4 Mar, 2020 09:05 am
As the Boston Globe said this morning, the day after is a new unofficial holiday: What the Heck Happened Wednesday.

This is one wacky election season. And one block of voters which is looming very, very large, are people of color. Candidates, underestimate them to your peril.
oralloy
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 4 Mar, 2020 09:37 am
@Real Music,
The only times that someone other than first or second went on to get the nomination has been when an incumbent president withdrew from the race after the primary had taken place.


1952
Democratic: Harry Truman withdrew after getting second place
Republican: I Like Ike first place

1956
Democratic: Adlai Stevenson second place
Republican: I Like Ike first place

1960
Democratic: John F. Kennedy first place
Republican: Richard Nixon first place

1964
Democratic: Lyndon B. Johnson first place
Republican: Barry M. Goldwater second place

1968
Democratic: Lyndon B. Johnson withdrew after winning
Republican: Richard Nixon first place

1972
Democratic: George McGovern second place
Republican: Richard Nixon first place

1976
Democratic: Jimmy Carter first place
Republican: Gerald R. Ford first place

1980
Democratic: Jimmy Carter first place
Republican: Ronald Reagan first place

1984
Democratic: Walter Mondale second place
Republican: Ronald Reagan first place

1988
Democratic: Michael Dukakis first place
Republican: George H. W. Bush first place

1992
Democratic: Bill Clinton second place
Republican: George H. W. Bush first place

1996
Democratic: Bill Clinton first place
Republican: Bob Dole second place

2000
Democratic: Al Gore first place
Republican: George W. Bush second place

2004
Democratic: John Kerry first place
Republican: George W. Bush first place

2008
Democratic: Barack Obama second place
Republican: John McCain first place

2012
Democratic: Barack Obama first place
Republican: Mitt Romney first place

2016
Democratic: Hillary Clinton second place
Republican: Donald Trump first place
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  2  
Reply Wed 4 Mar, 2020 09:45 am
@jespah,
I’m gobsmacked re the primary results. However, I don’t see how voters perceive a worthwhile difference between Biden and Sanders re policies or legislation in support of minorities. Not sure Biden is the answer but anyone will be better than the disgraceful treasonous Trump.
0 Replies
 
 

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