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Haiti the Invisible Country

 
 
Reply Wed 18 Sep, 2019 12:46 pm
Al Jazeera English
·
"Our conditions are inhumane."

Days of protests, sparked by a fuel shortage, has brought Haiti to a standstill. Roads have been blocked as schools, banks and government offices have closed their doors, with protesters demanding the president step down.
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Type: Discussion • Score: 5 • Views: 468 • Replies: 9

 
JTT
 
  -4  
Reply Wed 18 Sep, 2019 01:38 pm
@edgarblythe,
Why the US Owes Haiti Billions — The Briefest History
03/19/2010 05:12 am ET Updated May 25, 2011
Colin Powell, former US Secretary of State, stated his foreign policy view as the “Pottery Barn rule”: if you break it, you own it.

The US has worked to break Haiti for over 200 years. We owe Haiti. Not charity. We owe Haiti as a matter of justice. Reparations. And not the $100 million promised by President Obama either — that is Powerball money. The US owes Haiti Billions — with a big B.

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/why-the-us-owes-haiti-bil_b_426260
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  -3  
Reply Wed 18 Sep, 2019 01:44 pm
@edgarblythe,
As is always the case when it comes to a failed state, especially in Latin America it is the fault of the usa raping and pillaging what should be rich lands. In the case of Haiti, the French have a lot to do with it too.
0 Replies
 
bobsal u1553115
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Sep, 2019 11:29 am
No wonder I can't find it on a map.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Sep, 2019 11:32 am
@bobsal u1553115,
You can't find it on the news. Everybody wants to be a smart ass these days.
bobsal u1553115
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Sep, 2019 11:45 am
@edgarblythe,
Some people aspire to it, other have the office thrust upon them.

Haiti has no good news, ever; and there hasn't been a disaster is several years. To be fair, Santa Domingo hasn't been in the news either.


https://www.haitinewstoday.com/

https://haitiantimes.com/2019/08/03/haiti-in-trouble-again/

https://www.dw.com/en/haiti-thousands-protest-against-corruption/a-47421473

https://news.un.org/en/story/2019/02/1032441



https://news.un.org/en/tags/haiti/date/__item.file__

https://www.newsnow.co.uk/h/World+News/Caribbean/Haiti

https://www.npr.org/2019/02/15/695095120/do-not-travel-to-haiti-u-s-tells-citizens-citing-violent-unrest

https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2019/02/death-toll-rises-haiti-protest-crackdown-190214174428945.html

https://christiannews.net/2019/06/14/us-aid-workers-serial-rape-of-dozens-of-haitian-children-rocks-amish-mennonite-run-charity/

https://www.tennessean.com/story/news/2019/04/05/haiti-earthquake-survivor-meharry-grad-caring-vulnerable/3166748002/


No good news from Haiti, ever.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  2  
Reply Fri 20 Sep, 2019 04:59 am
Haiti has always had a hard time, it's because theirs was the first black revolution against white oppressors.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haitian_Declaration_of_Independence
RABEL222
 
  3  
Reply Fri 20 Sep, 2019 12:34 pm
@izzythepush,
Don't forget about the uneducated electorate. And the crooked politicians that populate Haiti.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Sep, 2019 12:46 pm
@RABEL222,
Have you seen The Serpent and the Rainbow?

It's a horror film based on a true story and Haiti is still dominated by voodoo.

0 Replies
 
bobsal u1553115
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Sep, 2019 10:43 am
@izzythepush,
Or that the US has made the equivalent of billions over collecting from the Haitians the "costs" of the many US military incursions into Haiti.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haiti%E2%80%93United_States_relations

Haiti–United States relations (1804–1914)

After Haiti gained its independence from France in 1804, through slave rebellion, the pro-slavery south worried this event could influence slaves in the US, and America refused to recognize Haiti's independence until 1862.[3] President Andrew Johnson suggested annexing the island to secure influence over Europe in the Caribbean.[3] The US government never followed through, but did post active military on the island during this period.[3] Through the nineteenth century, people who were mixed-race and blacks often entered into conflicts and called on foreign intervention. During this period according to historian Hans Schmidt, the U.S. Navy sent ships to Haiti 19 times between 1857 and 1913 to "protect American lives and property" until the United States finally occupied Haiti in 1915.[2]:330–331 One example of a US-Haiti conflict was the Môle Saint-Nicolas affair.
Occupations of Haiti by the United States (1915–1934)
Main article: United States occupation of Haiti

From 1915 to 1934 the U.S. Marines occupied Haiti.[3] Prior to the occupation, the U.S. military took control of the banks and collected $500,000 to hold in New York.[3] The Haitian constitution was written in a manner that prevented foreign entities from owning land or operating in Haiti. However, as a result of the occupation, the United States had influenced the Haitian government to rewrite the constitution to repeal an 1804 provision that forbade foreigners from owning land in Haiti.[4] This occupation impacted the nation's economy as well as the people's self-image and independence. Ultimately, Haitians united in resistance of the U.S. occupation and U.S. forces left in 1934.[5] Left behind was a newly trained Haitian Army (the Garde) consisting of mostly black soldiers and mulatto officers, who dominated political office until 1947.[2]
U.S. interventions in Haiti (1957–2005)

From 1957 to 1971, Francois Duvalier governed Haiti under a repressive dictatorship, but some argue the United States tolerated the regime because it was staunchly anti-Communist and a counterbalance to Communist Cuba during the Cold War. [citation ] When Duvalier died, his son, Jean-Claude ("Baby Doc") took over and maintained many of his father's policies.[6]:3–4

The Reagan administration forced Baby Doc to leave in 1986, and when a repressive military dictatorship arose, President Reagan suspended aid. The George H.W. Bush Administration also embargoed and then blockaded Haiti, suspending all but humanitarian aid.[6]:4

After the fall of the Duvalier family and other military regimes, Jean-Bertrand Aristide was elected in 1990, but he was toppled in a coup 7 months later. From 1991–1994 the Clinton Administration imposed an economic blockade, which further impoverished the country, and eventually the Clinton Administration intervened militarily in 1994 to restore Aristide to power.[6]:4[2] U.S. support for Aristide waned following corruption concerns, and a February 2004 armed rebellion led to his exile.[6]:4

After Rene Preval succeeded Aristide, aid flowed again to Haiti, totaling $1.5 billion from 1990 to 2005.[6]:7
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