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WHAT SHALL WE DO WITH A DRUNKEN SAILOR?

 
 
Setanta
 
Reply Mon 6 Jun, 2005 02:09 am
I would like to start a thread in which i examine the careers of eight or nine of the most notorious of the "Pirates of the Carribean." They are a select number indeed--literally tens of thousands of privateers and pirates swarmed the West Indies in the 17th and 18th centuries. So i will begin with perhaps the most famous of them . . .

http://www.tartans.com/articles/famscots/g/kidd-pic1.gif

Captain Kidd

William Kidd was in born Greenock in Scotland circa 1645 (no exact date can be established--not unusual in the 17th and earlier centuries). As did so many youth from the poor countryside of Europe, he went to sea as a boy, and eventually found his way to New York, having impressed his masters enough that he was recommended as a master of his own vessel. In past centuries, a nation would supplement the efforts of its navy by issuing letters of marque. This is a document which authorizes the bearer to equip and arm a ship for the purpose of attacking the enemies of the King or Queen who issued the letter. Although a navy will attack enemy shipping, their principle concern is with the navy of their enemies; those with such a "piracy license" were known as privateers, and this was a form of private enterprise at which both the Americans and French excelled. William Kidd ran his early ventures with a navy-like discipline--not difficult with the Dutch and English settlers of New York, who were not ordinarily given to piracy--and he became known then and ever after as Captain Kidd. He enjoyed a good deal of success operating out of New York and sailing often in the West Indies.

The Carribean in the 17th Century was a paradise for pirates and privateers--the Spanish were everywhere established, were very wealthy in terms of silver and spices and sugar, and were militarily a joke. For Protestant "heretics" like the Dutch, the English and French Protestants, operating from their bases at Curaçao, Antingua and the Florida Keys respectively, the pickings were fat and easy. Kidd rapidly grew in wealth and fame.

http://www.legends.dm.net/art/capt_kidd.jpg

William Kidd entertains aboard Adventure Galley in New York harbor.

In 1689, King William III went to war yet again with France; now, however, as King of England, he could command the resources of that nation as well. In 1695, Captain Kidd was approached with a dazzling offer. He was given the chance to take command of a newly purchased vessel, Adventure Galley, then mounting 34 guns and crewed by eighty men. From surviving images, it seems to have been a monstrously large cross between a frigate (a ship then still small in relation to later models)--a purely sailing vessel--and a pinnace, a small lanteen-rigged vessel (fitted with large triangular sails) which also shipped oars. Adventure Galley is said to have shipped oars as well, and to have had a burthen of 290 tons.

http://www.angelfire.com/realm/peggiss/kiddsgalley.jpeg

Armed with a letter of marque to attack French shipping, and charged with eliminating the polyglot pirate havens of Madagascar, Kidd set out in 1696 from London to New York. However, the pickings proved slim--the seas were full of these venture capitalists, and most Frenchmen in the Carribean were in the same line of work. Kidd's crew, now grown to 150 men, were restless--many had followed the fortunes of piracy for all of their adult lives, and they were a different matter than the crews Kidd had managed out of New York. Kidd then decided to make sail for Madagascar, hoping to please both the King and his surly crew. He is said to have attacked several ships en route, but the proceeds apparently were not rich enough to satisfy his pirates. Arriving at Madagascar, ninety of his crew promptly deserted and took ship with other pirates. Kidd now turned to outright piracy, while always attempting to avoid attacking English shipping. He worked the Malabar coast of India throughout 1697, but twice turned away from heavily armed merchants which he thought to be British. When Kidd's Gunner, William Moore, loudly demaned from the quarter deck that they attack any ship which came in sight, Kidd refused. Moore then accused Kidd of cowardice (not a very smart thing to do with a large, strong man of known short temper) and tried to lead a mutiny; Kidd picked up an iron-bound bucket, and swung it at Moore's head. The next day the concusion Moore had received killed him. In January 1698, Kidd finally sighted Quedagh Merchant, a 400 ton merchant ship, near the mouth of the Red Sea. (Naval tonnage does not refer to weight, rather, one ton is 100 cubic feet of storage space in the hold--400 tons would be 40,000 cubic feet in the hold, modest by today's standards, that was quite a large merchant vessel at the time.) The vessel positively groaned under the weight of its cargo: silk, muslins, calico, sugar, opium, pig iron and saltpeter--plus a supercargo (company agent) with a good deal of gold coin. Estimates of the worth of the cargo run to 50,000 English pounds--at at time when a day laborer in New York might work all year to earn four pounds. There was only one small problem: Quedagh Merchant was owned by the British East India Company--she had been flying French colors to keep off the privateers who swarmed the Red Sea and Malabar coast. Kidd tried to return the ship and cargo, but his crew to a man turned on him.

So Kidd sailed away with Quedagh Merchant in tow, unable to sell the prize at any reputable port. By now, Adventure Galley had become "rotten" (marine worms eat into the hull of any wooden vessel not bound in copper, as was the practice in those days with naval vessels and very expensive merchant ships). Kidd transferred to Quedagh Merchant, renaming it Adventure Prize, and made sail for the West Indies. Stopping at various ports in the Windward Islands, he and his crew learned that warrants had been issued for them for piracy, and for Kidd for the murder of William Moore. Kidd had hoped to use his New York connections for a pardon, but the word was out from St. Kitts to Barbados that the British East India Company would move heaven and earth to see him hanged. Kidd and his few remaining crew sold off the less valuable portions of their cargo, grounded Adventure Prize--being unable to sell her--and purchased a sloop, Antonio. This permitted them to escape attention and elude capture for a time.

Kidd returned to New York, and gave away some of his ill-gotten gains, and then buried the balance in coin. He hoped to use this loot as a bargaining chip toward a pardon. Governor Bellomont (New York and New England then had a single Royal Governor) lured Kidd to Boston with the inference that a pardon might be negotiated, and then had him clapped in irons. He was tortured to reveal where he had buried the coin, and then shipped to London where he was shut away in Newgate Prison. A year later, in March, 1701, Kidd was rushed through several Admiralty trials, the proceedings of which are better left unexamined. (Kidd would not turn evidence on his mates, and the documents relating to his privateering and his London backers "disappeared," while "witnesses" who were said to have been too pale and malnurished to ever have sailed the Indian Ocean suddenly appeared, speaking thick Cockney and reeking of rum.) On May 23rd, 1701, Kidd was hanged. The rope broke twice--but the third time was "the charm," and he was then cut down, his body dipped in hot tar, and hung in a cage over the Thames River to warn others of the consequences of piracy.

http://www.tartans.com/articles/famscots/g/kidd-pic2.gif

The buried treasure of Kidd was dug up from Gardiner's Island hard by Long Island. Kidd is actually the only pirate ever known positively to have buried his treasure. But Antonio had sailed up the Connecticutt River before going on to New York, and rumors abounded from the time he dropped anchor in the East River that more coin was buried elsewhere. Robert Lewis Stevenson's Treasure Island has only spurred the imaginations of and wetted the appetites of treasure hunters. But before Stevenson's time, early in the 19th century, Abner Field and two of his friends thought they could get Kidd's treasure which had been buried on Clarke's Island in the Connecticutt River, near Northfield, Massachusetts. Their story goes that they had learned of the legend of the treasure from the grandson of a survivor of Kidd's crew. The treasure was buried on the island, and the crew drew lots to see who would be killed and buried above the treasure chest (sixteen men on a dead man's chest?) to ward off treasure hunters. Field and his companions "knew" that they had to form a triangle around the spot, dig up the treasure at midnight, beneath a full moon, in complete silence. They claimed to have dug for more than an hour in complete silence, horribly tormented by the mosquitoes, but fearing to kill them lest the sound of the slap break the charm. They then claimed that they heard the sound of metal on metal, and uncovered the chest! One of them shouted out "You've hit it!"--and the chest sank from sight, never to be recovered. Nice story--believe it if you will.

http://tinpan.fortunecity.com/lennon/897/images/Map.gif
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aidan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Jun, 2005 04:00 am
Love it Setanta! Even though I'm a girl, I've always loved reading about pirates and cowboys. Maybe because I'm a wanderer myself...

Growing up, I read Daphne DuMaurier's Jamaica Inn, set in Cornwall during the days when smugglers and pirates roamed the seas. Last fall, I went to Land's End at dusk and walked across the moors to the ocean as the moon was rising - it was an incredibly windy night and the ocean just pounded the rocks below. There was one light shining over on the next point- the whole scene transported me directly back into the pages of that novel that had so fascinated me as a girl.

Tell us some more....
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Jun, 2005 04:00 am
http://historicbeaufort.com/images/blackbdflag-sm.jpg http://seacoastnh.com/arts/res/blackbeard.jpeg

Blackbeard

Blackbeard's career as a pirate captain lasted only a little more than two years, but he indelibly burned his image into the minds of contemporaries, and has lived on, larger than life ever since. Contemporary images all show him with his beard braided, and slow matches (a type of slow burning fuse which gunners use to fire a cannon) shoved up under his hat. His habit of keeping the burning slow matches under his hat in combat meant that his head would be wreathed in smoke. He also wore a crimson coat, opened over his naked, hairy chest, with two swords at his waist, and bandoleers with powder and single-shot pistols crossed on his chest--and he seemed the very Devil to those whom he attacked. Among all of the "great" pirates, Blackbeard seemed to truly "live the life." In truth, however, none of his contemporaries ever positively accused him of murder. If those whom he attacked surrendered, he'd take their money and goods, any navigational instruments, all the alcohol, and leaving enough food for the crew, allow them to sail off. If they fought, he fought back with a will. He would then take everything of value, maroon the crew, and burn their vessel to the water line, making sure to see it sink before sailing off. He very obviously understood the value of image and reputation.

He took the sloop Revenge from Stede Bonnet (whom i will profile later), and when he was killed, a sheet from what appears to have been his log was found, which reads as follows:

(quoted from A General History of the Robberies and Murders of the Most Notorious Pirates, Captain Charles Johnson, London, 1724)

Another poor boy from England, born about 1680, there are contradictory accounts about his origins. One of the earliest sources states that his name was Edward Drummond, and that he was born in London. Other accounts say he was born in Bristol--the most outrageous sources say Jamaica or Philadelphia. For the last two centuries, he has been commonly known as Edward or John Teach, or John Thach (also, Thatch or Thache). Many, perhaps most, modern students consider John Thach to have been most likely, but that could have been an alias, as John Teach has been suggested to be; that name would lead one to believe that he or his father were at one time thatchers, before the boy ran off to sea. I will use the more familiar name, Teach.

Teach found his way to sea, and arrived in 1716 at New Providence in the Bahamas, off the coast of Florida. There he encountered Benjamin Hornigold, and joined his crew. In the 17th century, pirates and privateers were so thick in the Carribean that Governors of the islands of the European nations hired them as private armies to attack the Spanish and whomever they were at war with at the time. But by the beginning of the 18th century, piracy was waning, as the French, English and Dutch began to think better of letters of marque (most privateers were indistinguishable from pirates, and even those, like William Kidd, who tried to "play by the rules," often found themselves at the mercy of crews with little to no scruples about the source of their booty). The French had, in fact, started on Hispaniola (the island which is comprised of Haiti and the Dominican Republic today) and in the Florida Keys by establishing bases for smugglers and privateers--France began the 17th century at war with Spain, and it was convenient to get rid of the French Protestants by sending them off to the Carribean to prey upon the hapless Spaniard. The English "venture capitalists" made a similar haven for themselves in the Bahamas, literally thousands of islands with plenty of shoal water and shallows where a small vessel like a pinnace or a sloop could escape the heavy royal sloops and war galleons of the Costa Garda sent to destroy them. It was here that Teach learned the trade under Hornigold, and he proved to be a very quick study, indeed.

Teach was so promising that Hornigold, sailing in a captured Spanish royal sloop, gave Teach a smaller sloop with six guns, to accompany him in his raids. At some time late in 1717, in the Saint Vincent passage south of Martinique, Hornigold and Teach encountered a large, heavily built Dutch trading vessel, a fluyt, which was the ancestor of the frigate. Although not very fast or maneouverable, they are extremely sturdy and capacious ships, with a shallow draft--originally designed to trade in the rivers of northern Europe. Hornigold and Teach each sailed to a different tack (these islands are known as the Windward Islands, because they lie to the east of the Spanish Main, and the prevailing wind in the Carribean is from the east), and both fired across the bow of the Dutchman, named Concorde, at the same time, killing several crew members. Teach then begged Hornigold to let him keep Concorde, and Hornigold, sensing what was in the wind for pirates, agreed. He had become sufficiently wealthy to retire in modest comfort in New Providence, and he basically handed his business over to Teach.

http://www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/sections/maritime/Blackbeard/flute-black2.jpg

The ship captured had changed hands before, which was fairly typical of piracy in those waters in those days. When Teach took her for his own, she was in the possession of a Frenchman from St. Malo (a heavily Protestant French seaport which was a fertile recruiting ground for French privateers). The cargo was rich and varied, which suggests that the Frenchman may have been practicing some piracy of his own--but he was killed, and his crew marooned, so there is no comtemporary account to verify this. Teach promptly paid off crew whom he considered slack or trepidacious, and with a select company (his ship was not built for a large crew) and trailing his sloop, he went to work to perfect his theatrical skills. He flew the flag you see at top of the page, and he required his men to go heavily armed when approaching a victim. He would fire across the bow of the intended victim, and while keeping his guns at the ready (and a burning slow match in his hat), he would cautiously approach, giving them time to strike (haul down their flag to indicate surrender)--which they usually did. What makes this very interesting is that the ship, which he named Queen Anne's Revenge, has been found: Queen Anne's Revenge Project

Teach attacked larger and larger vessels. He sold off the small sloop, and kept his men in a state of drunkenness as much as possible. Early in 1718, he fell in with Stede Bonnet, sailing his sturdy, custom built sloop Revenge. He quickly grew comtemptuous of Bonnet, and made him a "guest" on board Queen Anne's Revenge, putting Revenge in command of one of his trusted lieutenants. At this point, Teach seems to have been overcome by hubris. In May, 1718, he blockaded the harbor at Charleston, South Carolina. Using his and Bonnet's ships, he denied entry to any ships who attempted the passage, taking their goods if they were foolish enough to fall into his clutches. He demanded money, food and rum, and medicine. The proud planters of Charlestown (as it was then known) at first refused. Most of South Carolina's plantation owners did not actually live on their lands, but preferred to live in high style in Charlestown. But Teach held the blockade for weeks, and the citizens of the town finally caved in and paid a ransom. Teach's crews had become restless, so he allowed a division of the plunder, and the ships each sailed off on their own. The people of Charlestown were enraged, and determined to put piracy to an end. They paid to outfit pirate hunters, and sent them to clean up the Bahamas. There actually wasn't much left to "clean up," but they did manage to take Stede Bonnet, and in September of 1718, he was hanged in Charlestown.

http://www.tourbeaufort.com/lodging/photo.11.jpg

Beaufort, or Topsail inlet on a moonlit night.

Before the pirate hunters set out, though, Blackbeard sailed into Beaufort Inlet, then known as Topsail inlet, and at the end of June, 1718, he grounded Queen Anne's Revenge and a sloop, Adventure, telling the crews that they would careen them. Careening means grounding a ship in shoal water, draggin her higher as the tide rises, and then rolling her on her side at low tide, to clean and repair the hull. Teach and selected crew members then grabbed the booty while Bonnet and the others slept, took sail north in Bonnet's sloop Revenge, and entered Pamlico Sound near the town of Bath in North Carolina. Using influence and liberal bribes, as well as the known hostility of the small farmers of North Carolina for the planters of South Carolina, Teach obtained a pardon from the Royal Governor, Charles Eden, and settled down to retire. It is said that he and Eden were friends--it is also said that Eden lived a life of ostentatious wealth after the pardon. But retirement palled on him, and he soon fitted out another sloop, set up a haven on Ockracoke Island near Cape Hatteras, and began to prey on the local shipping of Virginia and North Carolina.

http://www.ibiblio.org/ghosts/ship2.gif

Blackbeard had honed his image too well, however. Although no outright murder has ever been reliably attributed to him, and although he was extremely lenient by "piratical" standards, his name struck such fear that a public outcry arose. The English colonists complained to Governor Spotswood of Virginia, who sent a squadron lead by a frigate, which finally cornerd Blackbeard near Ockracoke. Lieutenant Robert Maynard, in command of the frigate, trapped Blackbeard's sloop on a lee shore (putting his frigate between the sloop and the wind), but in dodging a broadside from the pirates, he grouned his own ship, and so decided to board the sloop. The fighting was very bloody, and Lieutenant Maynard attested that when he found Blackbeard's body, there were four bullets in him, and more than twenty slashes from the cutlass. Blackbeard at least lived up to his image in the act of dying.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Jun, 2005 04:05 am
Well, Boss, there's some more for you. You will see that i quoted "Captain Charles Johnson." Many people today believe that A General History of the Robberies and Murders of the Most Notorious Pyrates was actually written by Daniel Defoe, the author of Robinson Crusoe. I had and read the book years ago, but alas, as so many of my books seem to do, it grew legs and disappeared.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Jun, 2005 04:42 am
bm
0 Replies
 
aidan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Jun, 2005 04:55 am
"Such a day...rum all out....rogue's a plottin'" - wouldn't you have loved to have been there- for the good times anyway - sailing on the ocean, hangin' out on Topsail Island and Ocracoke - two of my old haunts by the way, having spent a good portion of my twenties in NC - love, love, love the outer banks, so again, have always felt a special affinity for Blackbeard.
*Sorry for all the dashes - but that's how I punctuate when I'm too excited to speak in full sentences. Pitiful huh, it takes so little to excite me.
*Thanks for the exquisite photo - I'm saving it.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Jun, 2005 05:31 am
http://victorian.fortunecity.com/manet/394/bonnet.jpg . http://www.inkyfingers.com/pyrates/flags/bonnetF.gif

The "Gentleman Pirate"--Stede Bonnet

The flag you see above is attributed to Stede Bonnet. It is commonly called the "Jolly Roger," but for an odd reason. To the English, the message that no quarter will be asked or given (a fight to the death) was always a black flag--the expression "to hang out the black flag" always meant kill or be killed. But the early piracy of the Carribean was largely done by French Protestants operating out of the Florida Keys, or the island of Hispaniola (which is swampy and much surrounded by shoal water, and so was not extensive colonized by the Spaniard). They would hang a blood red flag as they approached their victims, to signal that immediate surrender would be the only way to avoid bloodshed. They called this flag la jolie rouge, the "pretty red," and this was corrupted into "Jolly Roger" by English speakers, who changed it to a black flag so their own countrymen who were victims would have no doubt about their intentions.

Bonnet lived in Bridgetown on the island of Barbados. Barbados was the English entrepôt for spice and sugar to be shipped back to England, and the luxuries and dry goods which sold so well on the Spanish main. Although Trinidad had originally been an unclaimed haven for pirates and smugglers, the Spanish decided to end the smuggling by taking over the island. The smugglers simply switched to Barbados, and the "privateers," who usually didn't have a letter of marque, found it convenient to off-load their plunder there on moonlit nights. Bonnet was born about 1688 (this is uncertain), and had become an officer of the local militia, and was styled "Major" Stede Bonnet, of "the King's Guard." He had a very liberal education, and was an idle planter, living in style with modest wealth. He was also, according to contemporary accounts, living with an absolute shrew. His wife made his every moment a misery, and one can imagine the times he must have seen the pinnaces and sloops unloading their plunder on the beach, and dreamed of a different life. So, in 1717, to the mortification of his wife and friends, and the astonishment of Barbados society in general, he declared that he would become a coastwise trader. He purchased a sloop of the best quality, and had it custom fitted for hard service, and mounted ten guns (good thing too, as he was no kind of a sailor). After a few days of playing the Sea Captain in the harbor at Bridgetown, on a moonless night he slipped his mooorings with the tide and put to sea. Pirates are in their own way a forgiving lot, and it seems his crew were more amused than awed by him, and he provided the enterprising a wonderful opportunity to sail in a sound and nimble vessel, with a captain who was unlikely to interfer with their preferred pursuits. Bonnet's love of fine dress earned him the name "Gentleman Pirate." However, a more apt name might have been "the clueless pirate." He did show some sense, however, because he actually paid his men, the initial payroll was out of his own pocket. This may also be taken as a sign of his cluelessness, however, as he may simply have been thinking in terms of an officer and his soldiers. Most pirates who signed on with a privateer were made to sign or make their mark on a contract for a percentage of the take, though, and Bonnet's model method appealed to his crew. They felt that "he was good for it," and there is no account that any of his crew ever abandoned him or plotted mutiny--at first.

http://georgespoint.com/Pirates/PirateImages/sloop.jpg

A modern replica of a late 17th century sloop

Bonnet's preferred technique was to catch small coast-wise traders which had grounded, or had careened. The marine "worm" known as the teredo is actually a mollusk, and it leaves a shell behind after it has eaten its fill of the ship's wood. Both teredos and barnacles can "foul" a ship's hull, and if she is sailing slowly, or turning slowly, it is worth a master's time to beach and careen his vessel, as he can then shave days off his sailing time. It seems that Bonnet preferred to take careened vessels, as it did not require him to sail his sloop well, nor to fight it out on the deck. Men on a beach are no match for a vessel with cannon under sail. Late in 1717, he sailed north to New England. He had taken some careened ships on the Virginia Capes, and then took Turbes, a Barbadian ship. He burned her to the water line, thinking to cover his tracks, but the story got out, and got out so fast that within a month he knew that all Barbados knew what he was up to. He thereafter developed the habit of burning any Barbadian ships he took, although it ought to have been obvious to him that he was creating a trademark rather than covering his tracks. It became increasingly evident to his crew that he lacked the knowledge to find good pickings, and despite a regular cash payroll, they began to mutter to themselves so frequently that even The Dumb Pirate noticed. So he made sail for the Bay of Honduras, promising great things to his crew.

Early in 1718, Bonnet fell in with Blackbeard. Blackbeard sized his man up rather quickly, and took possession of Revenge, putting it in command of one of his Gunners named Richards, and then made Bonnet comfortable in Queen Anne's Revenge. As Blackbeard kept his own crew drunk most of the time, it was a simple matter for him to provide Bonnet with good wine rather than rum, and Bonnet seems to have preferred to have his ship "managed" for him. He was "living the life," and that was good enough for him. It took Blackbeard about one day sailing aboard Revenge to convince the crew that muttering about management might be unhealthy. Blackbeard now disposed of several ships and it was at about this time that he conceived of his plan to blockade Charlestown. Some writers suggest that he was impressed by Bonnet's prattling about wealthy people, and from his own experience knew that American coastal waters were not patrolled, as the Costa Garda patrolled the Spanish Main.

Awaking hung-over and astonished in Topsail inlet on a morning in the summer of 1718, Bonnet realized that he had been had by Blackbeard. He convinced some of the crew to join him, and they scraped Adventure and put her upright, and floated her on the tide. Probably, his reputation for paying his crews in cash attracted the more sanguine among those left behind by Blackbeard--at any event there was no plunder left them, and they had to go somewhere. Where that was that they went was Bath, to secure a pardon from Governor Eden, which he happily granted (probably convinced by some of the same gilded "evidence" which Teach had used). Like Teach, Bonnet could not let go of the life, having lived it, and within weeks, he was back to the pirate's life. In September 1718, he was taken by one of the ships commissioned by the good people of Charlestown, commanded by Colonel William Rhett. He was taken to Charlestown to the Court of Vice-Admiralty, and condemned to death by Sir Nicholas Trott. Bonnet is said to have cut as fine a figure in the court as he had on the quarterdeck, and there was a great deal of sympathy for him among the ladies. He is said to have appealed to the bench: "Cut off my arms and cut off my legs so that I may sit and read from scriptures and, may it please you sir, I will for ever sing praised to our Lord. But, whatever you do, don't hang me!" For however harrowing and moving the appeal seemed to the ladies in the court, Sir Nicholas was unimpressed--Bonnet was hanged for piracy at Charlestown on December 10, 1718. (This contradicts what i wrote above, but i've vetted this, and am confident of this account.)

http://www.vleonica.com/bonnet2lg.jpg
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Jun, 2005 05:53 am
Aidan: My brother lives in Wrightsville Beach (or used to live on Azelea Drive between Wilmington and the beach), and when i lived in North Carolina, i would go to the beach at Moorhead City. I loved the Outer Banks, too, but they are being ruined by people with too much money and too little sense who want to build houses out there.

I'm glad you're enjoying the thread. I suspect EB will enjoy it as well, i think he liked the Frigate thread.

Although i have to leave off for now, my next project will be the fearsome threesome--Calico Jack Rackham, Ann Bonny and Mary Read.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Jun, 2005 06:08 am
Yarrghh.
0 Replies
 
aidan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Jun, 2005 06:59 am
My sentiments exactly. We spent a week with friends in Duck last summer - they live in Ohio so a week at the beach is a big event for them- anyway was just blown away by the sheer size of all the "mini-estates" that have sprung up. Don't know how that little strip of sand can support it all - and the traffic has just gotten out of hand.

Still love Ocracoke, though haven't been in recent years. I'm hoping it's been able to hang on to its little fishing village/hippie/artist haven status.

Have walked the pier at Wrightsville many times. Wilmington is another place that has just boomed because it used to be such a nice place to live. True for NC in general I'm finding. Moved down there in the 80's to escape NJ - but when I lived there last from 2001-2004 - in Chapel Hill - I was feeling that I might have well have just stayed in NJ. Sad - but that's why I like reading your stories- one can be transported back imagining it as it once was. Thanks for doing it - I'll be keeping an eye out for the next chapter in the serial. Hey - there's an idea- ever thought of writing a book? On pirates maybe....
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Jun, 2005 07:21 am
farmerman wrote:
Yarrghh.


I be puttin' ye in the mood fer dealin' with them Newfies, Matey . . .
0 Replies
 
Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Jun, 2005 07:26 am
. . . for the call of the running tide
Is a wild call and a clear call
that may not be denied;
And all I ask is a windy day
with the white clouds flying,
And the flung spray and the blown spume,
and the sea-gulls crying. . .





This bookmark courtesy of John Masefield.
Thanks, Set. I'm here for the ships.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Jun, 2005 07:27 am
OK, Boss, i'm too tired and my eyes are hurting to much to do anymore long text, but ships i got . . .
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Jun, 2005 08:03 am
http://www.sevenoceans.com/Ships/Images/ShipsByType/Sloop.jpg

This is the more common form of the sloop as seen in the Carribean in the 17th and 18th centuries.


http://www.wplaced.com/pics/sloop-prov.jpg

This is an excellent image of a sloop of war on a beam reach (with the wind coming over the side, here it is on a starboard beam reach)--it was larger and heavier, to carry more guns, and more often used as a pirate hunter. The smaller sloops of the pirates could hide in shoal waters. Shoal waters are shallow, with sandy and sometimes rocky ridges on the bottom.


http://www.providenceri.com/uss-providence/images/sloop-300h.jpg

The same sloop running before the wind--which was actually not its best point of sail.


http://pirateshold.buccaneersoft.com/images/ships/navy_sloop.jpg

The royal sloop was the largest and most heavily armed of its type, and was much favored by the Costa Garda of the Spanish Main. It drew too much water to follow the English pirates into the Bahamas, however.


http://www.euromodels.co.uk/classic/mantua/em0748.jpg

The pinnace came in many sizes, and drawing very little water, as well as being equipped with oars, it was a perfect ship for pirates who preyed on smaller merchant ships.

http://website.lineone.net/~dee.ord/Tudor/Caravel%201470%20p68.jpg

The pinnace was a refinement of the caravel, seen here. Two of Columbus' three ships were caravels--Nina and Santa Clara, the latter was nicknamed Pinta because of its brightly colored hull decorations.


http://www.mandabay.com/manda-bay-beach-club/dhow_safari_kenya.jpg

The caravel and it's descendant were both based upon a basic Arab design--the dhow. As seen here, it has not outlived its usefulness, and is still widely used on the east coast of Africa.


http://library.thinkquest.org/J0110360/Images/scarrack.jpg

The carrack and its more efficient Portugese cousin--the nao, were European attempts to improve upon the dhow and the xebec. As sailors, they failed--as cargo carriers, they vastly outperformed their Arab ancestors. Columbus' flag was in a carrack, Santa Maria. (This image rather exaggerates the contours of the carrack.)


http://www.flyinglab.com/pirates/catalog/images/xebec/xebec_inline_1.jpg

The larger pinnaces were based upon, and in fact, often exactly resembled the workhorse of Arab ocean-going trade, the xebec.


http://www.barquelasavoie.com/fr/images/barque-csoleil.jpg

The true small workhorse, or burro if you will, of the Carribean was the barque, originally a French design, based on the xebec. This excellent image is taken from astern.


More on the ships, later.
0 Replies
 
Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Jun, 2005 08:05 am
Oboy. I'll be here.

We're having tall ships visit Puget Sound soon.

http://specialdayevents.com/tall_ships_assets/ships_t-shirt_frame.jpg
0 Replies
 
Acquiunk
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Jun, 2005 08:10 am
Captain Kidd - Folklore

The has been a persistent tradition in eastern Connecticut that Kidd buried treasure in Coventry Connecticut that was never recovered. In the late 17th early 18th century there was an obscure route that ran from Hartford to Boston via Mendon Mass, through northeastern Connecticut, called the Connecticut Path. In the late 17th century this would have been wild and unsettled territory. The story - so it goes- is that Kidd and several of his cohorts, on their way to Boston, feared that Belmont would "steal" their gold and buried it in this out of the way location planning to return later to recover it, which they never did.

It is now suburbia, lots are available, perhaps the one you buy could be the lucky one. Interest rates are currently low, resonable terms available.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Jun, 2005 08:13 am
There's a hopeful property buyer born every minute . . . and two hucksters born to take advantage of him.

Got any brochures, Boss? I'll pass 'em around . . .
0 Replies
 
Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Jun, 2005 08:16 am
http://www.sevenoceans.com/Ships/Images/ShipsByType/Sloop.jpg

Oooooooooooooooooooooooooh.


Setanta wrote:

The true small workhorse, or burro if you will, of the Carribean was the barque, originally a French design, based on the xebec. This excellent image is taken from astern.


The HM Bark Endeavour looked a lot different, but bark and barque must be from a similar root. Can you explain that?

(Those lanteen rigs are nice.)
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Jun, 2005 08:27 am
The word barque is from the French, and means simply an ocean-going vessel. The first which they used regularly were based on Arab xebecs, and their first major use was in the Mediterranean, out of Toulon or Marseille. The English largely adopted and adapted Dutch designs, as being the best available in northern Europe--and they in their turn has improved upon the north German cog, a tub of a boat. The Dutch eliminated the design flaws and produced the fluyt, which i will show later.

The English at one time standardized an entire hierarchy of sea-going vessels. By that standard, a ship must have three masts. Vessels with only two masts were of four types--the pinnace, the sloop, the bark and the brig. There were smaller versions of the latter two, known as the barkentine and the brigantine. They will get their turn here, as well. Ships, having three or more masts, were not often used by pirates--they drew too much water to escape into shoal water as the English did in the Bahamas and the French did in Haiti and the Florida Keys; and, they drew too much attention from unpleasant visitors such as frigates or ships of the line. The pirates who were genuinely good sailors rather than just sea-going banditti seemed always to fall for the lure of sailing an actual ship, and then fell to the much bigger and better ships of the European navies. This was the fate Blackbeard, of Bart Roberts and of Calico Jack and his two She-Devils--taken by frigates or ships-of-the-line when they overreached themselves.

The man i'll save for last was Henry Morgan--and he avoided all of the failings of his confrères, retiring a wealthy man and titled aristocrat to a gigantic sugar plantation in Jamaica. He died in his bed, surrounded by his loved ones--the only famous pirate to achieve that end.

EDIT: I didn't really answer your question. The English simply used the word bark, having anglicized it, for a certain size of ship. It had no design relationship to a barque.
0 Replies
 
Acquiunk
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Jun, 2005 09:34 am
Setanta wrote:
There's a hopeful property buyer born every minute . . . and two hucksters born to take advantage of him.


Pirates come in many forms.
0 Replies
 
 

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