2
   

Turning PBS into another propaganda tool

 
 
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Nov, 2005 10:06 pm
Thomas, as I've had a number of contacts in VOA over the years, I can't say, either. Smile
0 Replies
 
blatham
 
  1  
Reply Mon 7 Nov, 2005 06:01 am
Thomas wrote:
Blatham -- this is sad, but not really new. Unlike PBS, which is admirably independent, Voice of America and Radio Free Europe always were propaganda tools for whatever administration held power in Washington. My Russian piano teacher once told me that back in the Soviet Union, when listening to foreign radio stations could get you into jail, dissidents religiously listened to BBC world service. RFE and VOA, by contrast, were generally not considered worth such a risk. My teacher and her friends would not go to jail for listening to American instead of Soviet propaganda, but would take that risk for real news. That was back in the sixties and seventies, so we're talking about a fairly old phenomenon here.

Plus, both stations always had a reputation here in Germany for laundering money and providing cover for CIA projects and agents. (RFE used to be in Munich.) How well deserved this reputation was I can't say.


thomas

It is Tomlinson's (and the other individuals noted) relationship to domestic broadcasting which is of primary importance. A propaganda organ functioning outside the country can be quite easily rationalized within the context of democracy. A pro-state (actually, pro-single party) propaganda organ inside the country, funded and organized by the state, cannot be rationalized.
0 Replies
 
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Mon 7 Nov, 2005 06:40 am
blatham wrote:
It is Tomlinson's (and the other individuals noted) relationship to domestic broadcasting which is of primary importance.

In that case we agree. I thought you posted the article mainly because of what it said about America's foreign media services. (And I also think the fact that VOA is internationally seen as an American propaganda shill is made worse, not better, by the perception being several decades old.)
0 Replies
 
blatham
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Nov, 2005 07:35 am
Quote:
Former public broadcasting chief violated ethics, investigators allege
Tomlinson said to exceed powers in bid to aid GOP
By Matea Gold, Los Angeles Times | November 16, 2005

WASHINGTON -- The former chairman of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting repeatedly violated the organization's rules and code of ethics in his efforts to promote conservatives in the system, an endeavor that included consultation with White House officials, according to an internal investigation released yesterday.

The 67-page report, the culmination of a six-month investigation by Kenneth A. Konz, the corporation's inspector general, portrayed former chairman Kenneth Y. Tomlinson as a rogue appointee who often exceeded his authority in his determination to right what he viewed as a liberal tilt in public broadcasting.

Konz's report depicted the corporation as a dysfunctional institution in which there has been little oversight over hiring and contracting and minimal communication between the professional staff and the politically appointed board.

In a statement included in the inspector general's report, Tomlinson, who resigned his board position earlier this month, denied wrongdoing. He called the findings a triumph of ''politics over good judgment" and disputed the allegations as ''malicious and irresponsible."

''Unfortunately, the inspector general's preconceived and unjustified findings will only help to maintain the status quo, and other reformers will be discouraged from seeking change," he said.

According to the report, Tomlinson consulted with Bush administration officials, including Deputy White House Chief of Staff Karl Rove, about his efforts, Konz found, even though the former chairman told the Los Angeles Times in May that he had had ''absolutely no contact from anyone at the White House saying we need to do this or that with public broadcasting."

But Konz said he discovered that in late 2003 and again earlier this year, Tomlinson exchanged e-mails with White House officials about possible candidates to serve as the corporation's president. Some of the e-mails discussed Tomlinson's desire to hire Patricia Harrison, a former Republican Party cochairwoman, whom the board appointed to the post in June.

''While cryptic in nature, their timing and subject matter gives the appearance that the former chairman was strongly motivated by political considerations in filling the president/CEO position," Konz wrote.

In an interview, the inspector general said Tomlinson exchanged e-mails with ''two or three" White House officials, including Rove. He declined to name the other officials.


The report said that Tomlinson was so zealous about the need to bring the political balance farther to the right that he instructed corporation staff to threaten to withhold funds from PBS to achieve it, an act that would have required congressional approval.

Corporation officials declined to comment on Tomlinson's specific actions, but board chairwoman Cheryl Halpern called Konz's findings ''bracing" and pledged to swiftly institute changes. During a morning meeting at the organization's Washington headquarters, the board approved the creation of committees aimed at improving checks and balances.

Harrison said she was determined to repair ''a rip in trust" created by the furor over Tomlinson's actions.
link
0 Replies
 
blatham
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 Dec, 2005 08:15 am
Well, it has finally happened. Clear Channel is selling the rights to name their "newsrooms" to corporate advertisers. (thanks eric alterman)


Quote:
WIBA sells name of its newsroom to a business
00:00 am 12/13/05
MELANIE CONKLIN [email protected]

It's been done with stadiums, pools and concert halls. Now, in an unusual move, Madison's WIBA radio station has sold the naming rights to its newsroom.

Beginning Jan. 1, the WIBA newsroom will be called the Amcore Bank News Center.

"This simply means they get 'name branding' with the description of the news center on air," confirmed Jeff Tyler, vice president of Clear Channel Radio-Madison, which owns WIBA-AM 1310 and FM 101.5. "What listeners will hear on air is something like, 'Now from the Amcore Bank News Center, here's WIBA's Jennifer Miller.'• "

http://www.madison.com/wsj/home/local/index.php?ntid=64670&ntpid=4
0 Replies
 
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 Dec, 2005 04:59 pm
This sounds suspiciously like a regressive trend, a return to those thrilling days of yesteryear when it was "the sponsor" who decided content on TV shows. Remember the 1950s? I'm old enough to recall the days when, if the Ford Motor Company sponsored, say, a detective show, you'd never see anybody driving anything except Fords, Mercuries and Lincolns, unless it was a criminal not allowed behind the wheel of a Ford. Fantastic. And this is a news room?
0 Replies
 
roverroad
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 Dec, 2005 09:52 pm
Merry Andrew wrote:
This sounds suspiciously like a regressive trend, a return to those thrilling days of yesteryear when it was "the sponsor" who decided content on TV shows. Remember the 1950s? I'm old enough to recall the days when, if the Ford Motor Company sponsored, say, a detective show, you'd never see anybody driving anything except Fords, Mercuries and Lincolns, unless it was a criminal not allowed behind the wheel of a Ford. Fantastic. And this is a news room?


Isn't it still that way? You can bet the products in these so called reality shows are placed there so that the cast can consume them with the label out. And other products that aren't sponsors tend to get their labels blurred out. You can bet that if Coke disagrees with the content of a show they will pull the sponsorship. And television/radio do dictate to a large degree the direction of our society. So it always has been ans always will be the big fat Republican millionaires that influence out society the most.

And do you thonk that any major news organisation would ever report anything bad about their biggest sponsor?
0 Replies
 
cjhsa
 
  0  
Reply Tue 13 Dec, 2005 10:27 pm
PCNNBS. With an emphasis on BS.
0 Replies
 
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Wed 14 Dec, 2005 04:38 am
roverroad wrote:
Merry Andrew wrote:
This sounds suspiciously like a regressive trend, a return to those thrilling days of yesteryear when it was "the sponsor" who decided content on TV shows. Remember the 1950s? I'm old enough to recall the days when, if the Ford Motor Company sponsored, say, a detective show, you'd never see anybody driving anything except Fords, Mercuries and Lincolns, unless it was a criminal not allowed behind the wheel of a Ford. Fantastic. And this is a news room?


Isn't it still that way? You can bet the products in these so called reality shows are placed there so that the cast can consume them with the label out. And other products that aren't sponsors tend to get their labels blurred out. You can bet that if Coke disagrees with the content of a show they will pull the sponsorship. And television/radio do dictate to a large degree the direction of our society. So it always has been ans always will be the big fat Republican millionaires that influence out society the most.

And do you thonk that any major news organisation would ever report anything bad about their biggest sponsor?


Couple of things, rover. It's true, of course, that broadcasters try not to offend major advertisers, but the situation today is a far cry from what it was back in the days when the sponsor actually had production control over network programming. Today there are virtually no shows -- entertainment or news -- that are the property of a single advertiser. Advertisers will try to place their commercials in specific time-slots during specific programs -- and pay top dollar for that privilege -- but they have no actual control over the content of the show in that they are not the only advertiser on a show. Product placement is another matter.

As for bad news about a sponsor (and the word "sponsor" is hardly ever used any more these days), there are some news that cannot be avoided. Had Enron been a major advertiser on any of the networks, I doubt that it could have escaped criticism scott-free. I generally listen to the news on NPR. While NPR has no "sponsors," it does get a goodly chunk of its financing from corporate "donors." And NPR regularly reports on the shenanigans of some of its major backers, usually including the disclaimer that the company being reported on has a financial arrangement with the network. This could change in time.
0 Replies
 
blatham
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 Aug, 2006 03:21 pm
What a guy!

Quote:
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/08/29/washington/29cnd-broadcast.html?ex=1157515200&en=82b010a2c704f122&ei=5115&partner=VERIZON
0 Replies
 
BumbleBeeBoogie
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Aug, 2006 08:04 am
Blatham
Blatham, how many bottom feeders are swimming in the Republican pond? I hope the Democrats learn the lesson and don't repeat the same behavior. When will the public no longer put up with such corruption?

BBB
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Aug, 2006 08:08 am
Does anyone have a schedule for PBS propaganda? I'd hate to think that i were missing any good shows . . .
0 Replies
 
BumbleBeeBoogie
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Aug, 2006 09:53 am
Bush appointee in hot water at second agency
Bush appointee in hot water at second agency
Fresh allegations against Tomlinson
Noam N. Levey, Los Angeles Times
Wednesday, August 30, 2006

Washington -- The official who oversees the federal government's broadcasts to foreign countries directed staff to do personal work and used government resources for his private racehorse operation, State Department investigators conclude in a new report.

Kenneth Tomlinson, a Bush appointee who chairs the Broadcasting Board of Governors, also double-billed the board for his own work, according to the report released Tuesday.

The new allegations come after Tomlinson was forced to resign last year as head of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting amid revelations of impropriety there.

"This is serious stuff," said Rep. Howard Berman, D-North Hollywood, who requested the investigation last year and was among three Democratic lawmakers who asked President Bush on Tuesday to remove Tomlinson. Sen. Chris Dodd of Connecticut and Rep. Tom Lantos of San Mateo were the other two lawmakers.

"The role of the Broadcasting Board of Governors in the context of the current international situation ... is of the highest priority," Berman said. "This is not some backwater."

The Broadcasting Board of Governors oversees all U.S. government and government-sponsored international broadcast programming, including the Voice of America, Radio and TV Marti and two services directed to the Middle East, Radio Sawa and the satellite television network Al Hurra.

Tomlinson, who was traveling out of the country, rebutted the allegations in a statement released late Tuesday.

"I am very proud of what I have accomplished for U.S. international broadcasting," said the former editor of Reader's Digest and friend of Bush political strategist Karl Rove. "I believe it will become clear this I.G. investigation was inspired by partisan divisions inside the BBG."

A White House spokeswoman also said Tuesday that the president continues to support Tomlinson.

Federal prosecutors have declined to investigate the case for criminal wrongdoing, according to the State Department report. But the new allegations detailed in the report only seem to portend more trouble for Tomlinson and the White House.

The Bush administration's campaign to build support in the Middle East and other areas of the Islamic world have already been derided as crude propaganda by some critics. U.S. efforts have been undermined by a series of public relations disasters, including the appearance in April 2004 of graphic photos showing abuse of detainees at Iraq's Abu Ghraib prison.

More recently, Al Hurra has been investigated for misuse of money, reportedly for procurement and contracting.

Tomlinson himself became the focus of unwelcome publicity last year amid allegations that he broke federal law, along with internal rules and ethics codes, in his efforts to bring more conservatives into the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

He resigned as chairman of the CPB in November ahead of an internal investigation that showed he worked with the Bush administration officials, including Rove, to find a president for the agency, which is supposed to act as a buffer between Congress and public broadcasting stations.

Tomlinson denied any wrongdoing at the time.

The State Department investigation found Tomlinson helped secure nearly $250,000 worth of business at the Broadcasting Board of Governors for a friend without the knowledge of other board members and staff. Investigators could find no written reports of what the friend did.

The investigation also revealed that Tomlinson used the board's computers and telephones for work on his private racehorse business.

Tomlinson's racehorses include three named for leaders of Afghanistan, including the country's president, Hamid Karzai, said a source familiar with the State Department report.

Investigators also found that Tomlinson overbilled the Broadcasting Board of Governors for work by claiming compensation for too many days and double-billed the board and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting for work performed on the same day.

Tomlinson dismissed the allegations Tuesday, noting that he "made diligent efforts to bill each board only for the work I did for each board."

He said his work on the horses while at the BBG came out to "an average of one e-mail and two and a half minutes a day," far less than he spent working on official business while at home. And he said he was proud of the work his friend did for the board.
------------------------

The Associated Press contributed to this report.
0 Replies
 
blatham
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Feb, 2007 08:11 am
Quote:
February 5, 2007
Bush Proposes Steep Cut to PBS Funding
By Ira Teinowitz
President Bush is reopening the fight over government support of public television, unveiling a 2007 government fiscal year budget that would cut federal funding for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting by nearly 25 percent.
http://www.tvweek.com/news.cms?newsId=11508
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Oct, 2008 09:29 pm
@blatham,
Quote:
Did PBS bury controversial torture documentary under pressure from Bush administration?

Scott Horton reports today that PBS may have refused to nationally air a controversial documentary on the use of torture by the U.S. government in order to protect its funding. Previously, the Bush administration threatened to cut PBS’s funding after it aired Bush’s War, a Frontline special critical of the war in Iraq:

On Thursday evening WNET in New York will air an important new documentary by Emmy and Dupont Award winning producer Sherry Jones entitled “Torturing Democracy.” It appears on WNET and several other affiliates independently because PBS would not run the show. […]

According to producer Sherry Jones, PBS told her that “no time slot could be found for the documentary before January 21, 2009″ " the day after George W. Bush and Dick Cheney leave office.

Watch a clip from Torturing Democracy here.

Did PBS bury controversial torture documentary under pressure from Bush administration?

Scott Horton reports today that PBS may have refused to nationally air a controversial documentary on the use of torture by the U.S. government in order to protect its funding. Previously, the Bush administration threatened to cut PBS’s funding after it aired Bush’s War, a Frontline special critical of the war in Iraq:

On Thursday evening WNET in New York will air an important new documentary by Emmy and Dupont Award winning producer Sherry Jones entitled “Torturing Democracy.” It appears on WNET and several other affiliates independently because PBS would not run the show. […]

According to producer Sherry Jones, PBS told her that “no time slot could be found for the documentary before January 21, 2009″ " the day after George W. Bush and Dick Cheney leave office.

Watch a clip from Torturing Democracy here.

JTT
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Oct, 2008 10:08 pm
@JTT,
Apropos of my last posting.

Quote:
CIA Tactics Endorsed In Secret Memos
Waterboarding Got White House Nod

By Joby Warrick
Washington Post Staff Writer
Wednesday, October 15, 2008; Page A01

The Bush administration issued a pair of secret memos to the CIA in 2003 and 2004 that explicitly endorsed the agency's use of interrogation techniques such as waterboarding against al-Qaeda suspects -- documents prompted by worries among intelligence officials about a possible backlash if details of the program became public.

The classified memos, which have not been previously disclosed, were requested by then-CIA Director George J. Tenet more than a year after the start of the secret interrogations, according to four administration and intelligence officials familiar with the documents. Although Justice Department lawyers, beginning in 2002, had signed off on the agency's interrogation methods, senior CIA officials were troubled that White House policymakers had never endorsed the program in writing.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/10/14/AR2008101403331.html?hpid=topnews

Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Wed 15 Oct, 2008 03:15 pm
@JTT,
Dunno about PBS, JTT, but the item about the secret CIA memos was just aired on NPR, the radio arm of PBS, just minutes ago.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

Obama '08? - Discussion by sozobe
Let's get rid of the Electoral College - Discussion by Robert Gentel
McCain's VP: - Discussion by Cycloptichorn
Food Stamp Turkeys - Discussion by H2O MAN
The 2008 Democrat Convention - Discussion by Lash
McCain is blowing his election chances. - Discussion by McGentrix
Snowdon is a dummy - Discussion by cicerone imposter
GAFFNEY: Whose side is Obama on? - Discussion by gungasnake
 
Copyright © 2021 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 09/19/2021 at 09:05:00