6
   

Should the democrats priority be to win back the Barack Obama states that Hillary Clinton lost?

 
 
Reply Sun 21 Apr, 2019 03:11 pm
I Wikipedia both the Obama 2012 victory and the Trump 2016 victory.
I discovered which Barack Obama states that Hillary Clinton lost to Trump.
That included a total number of six states

Those six states included:
1. Florida (29 electoral votes)
2. Iowa (6 electoral votes)
3. Michigan (16 electoral votes)
4. Ohio (18 electoral votes)
5. Pennsylvania (20 electoral votes)
6. Wisconsin (10 electoral votes)

These six Obama states that Clinton lost to Trump make up a combined total of 99 electoral college votes.

270 electoral college votes is needed for any candidate to win the presidency.

The 2020 presidential election will soon be upon us.


My question is should the democrats number 1 priority be to win back the Barack Obama (states) that Hillary Clinton lost?
 
Sturgis
 
  4  
Reply Sun 21 Apr, 2019 03:34 pm
@Real Music,
Their priority should be to stand shoulder to shoulder with whichever candidate receives the nomination and reach out to all voters.

To prioritize by making their goal one of retrieval of voters they lost in 2016, sends a message to other locations, especially ones which may have only had a slim margin of win, that they don't matter near as much. If they don't head out treating all voters as important to the future, there could be a new group of States which go to the opponent.
Real Music
 
  2  
Reply Sun 21 Apr, 2019 10:26 pm
@Sturgis,
Priorities can be measured in various ways:

1. One way might be how frequent or how often a candidate campaigns in a particular state.
2. Another way might be how much money is spent on television and radio ads in a particular state.
3. Another way might be how extensive and robust the ground game is in a particular state.
4. Another way might be how much emphasis is place on a policy that is important to a particular state.

Some states are deep red republican states.
Some states are deep blue democrat states.
Some states lean slightly republican.
Some states lean slightly democrat.
Some states might be trending republican
Some states might be trending democrat.

The electoral college votes will ultimately determine the winner.
Hillary Clinton won the popular vote, but Donald Trump won the electoral college vote.
0 Replies
 
jespah
 
  3  
Reply Mon 22 Apr, 2019 05:07 am
Watch populations trends, as those can often (not always) demonstrate voting trends. And as with every other form of advertising (for that's what a campaign is), tailor the message to the audience.
0 Replies
 
neptuneblue
 
  2  
Reply Mon 22 Apr, 2019 05:21 am
Ohio will get next to NOTHING.

https://www.cleveland.com/politics/2019/03/prominent-democratic-super-pac-says-ohio-isnt-a-top-priority-in-2020.html

CLEVELAND, Ohio – One of the most prominent Democratic super PACs in the country does not have Ohio high on its list of targets for the 2020 presidential election, further eroding the state’s status as a presidential battleground.

A report from Priorities USA, the primary super PAC that supported both President Barack Obama’s 2012 re-election campaign and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s 2016 presidential campaign, significantly downgrades Ohio’s targetability, listing it as a “GOP Watch” state along with Texas and Iowa. That’s below other more traditional swing states like Florida, Pennsylvania and North Carolina, but also historically red states like Arizona and Georgia.

The Buckeye State is also notably absent from the super PAC’s $100 million early engagement program planned for Wisconsin, Michigan, Pennsylvania and Florida. A second phase without a dollar amount attached will include Nevada, Arizona, Georgia, North Carolina and New Hampshire.

“It’s not in our initial spending plans,” said Josh Schwerin, spokesman for Priorities USA. “It is in the states to watch and see if an investment is worth making.”

In plainer terms, Ohio is a luxury, not a necessity.

“That doesn’t mean we don’t think Ohio is winnable for a Democrat,” Schwerin said. “What we think that means is if Ohio is in play, we’ll have already won the easier states and have 270 electoral votes. Our investment strategy is how to get to 270 electoral votes.”
revelette1
 
  2  
Reply Mon 22 Apr, 2019 08:26 am
@neptuneblue,
I guess there is no way to influence these Super Pacs to invest in the states Hillary lost rather than concentrating on states which are winnable? If a lamb (sorry to use a sort biblical theme) runs off, don't it make more sense to concentrate on getting that lamb back while still leaving a few shepherds guarding the sheep in the fold?
0 Replies
 
Real Music
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Apr, 2019 08:00 pm
@neptuneblue,
Yes, Hillary Clinton lost Ohio to Donald Trump.
We must not forget that Obama won Ohio twice.

It would be wise for the democrats to figure out why Hillary Clinton lost Ohio when Barack Obama was able to win Ohio twice.

Maybe Clinton should have had (many) more campaign stops in Ohio.
Maybe Clinton didn't have as much charisma as Obama.
Maybe she had the wrong message.
Maybe she didn't excite people enough.
Maybe there were various other reasons.
Who knows why Clinton wasn't able to duplicate what Obama did in Florida, Iowa, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin.

If Obama was able to win Ohio and its 18 electoral college votes twice, the democrats should be putting a very high priority in winning back that state in 2020.

Ohio's 18 electoral college votes is nothing to sneeze at.
engineer
 
  2  
Reply Tue 23 Apr, 2019 06:40 am
@Real Music,
That's true, but Ohio has been going more and more red for years. The governor is Republican as are 12 of 16 representatives and one senator. They own the state house 61 to 38 and the senate 23 to 9. The Democratic candidate should by all means compete for Ohio, but remember that Ohio just loves the Confederate battle flag (you know the one under which rebels killed Ohio boys).
Real Music
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Apr, 2019 09:12 pm
@engineer,
I still believe that the democrats should go all in to win back Obama's Ohio, but your points pertaining to Ohio are all valid.

What about the other states that Obama won and Clinton lost?

Just like Ohio, Obama did win Florida, Iowa, Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin all twice.
0 Replies
 
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Apr, 2019 09:31 pm
@engineer,
It boggles the mind doesn't it.
0 Replies
 
Real Music
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Apr, 2019 10:01 pm
Why these 4 Rust Belt states are all key for Trump.

For Donald Trump to win the White House he'll have to win in
Ohio, Pennsylvania, Michigan and Wisconsin.
John King breaks down the votes he needs to earn.

Published May 5, 2016
0 Replies
 
mark noble
 
  -1  
Reply Thu 25 Apr, 2019 09:58 am
@Real Music,
The UK, wherefrom doth I spawn - Outside the asylum, has NO interest in politics.
We may analyse their 'schoolboy' party politics, but only out of derision for their detached spacial inheritance.

So, it is weird to us (Not all) when we observe such as the US - Defining themselves as politically attached.

You are far more than they program you to be - But it's your reality.

'The Democrats' - 'The Humans' - 'The aristocrats'...
Labels of detachment from the whole.
Labels of detachment from each other.
Labels of detachment from equality.

Read Plato's 'Republic' - It's about the condtioning of societies to best meet the requirements of the establishment.

So, 'The Democrats' priority should be - To follow their given ideal/s.


0 Replies
 
Real Music
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 26 Apr, 2019 11:25 pm
2020 candidates to pitch working-class credentials to (union).


Published April 26, 2019
Quote:

LAS VEGAS — A half-dozen Democratic presidential candidates will descend on Las Vegas on Saturday to pitch themselves to one of America's largest unions as champions of workers and kitchen-table issues.

The daylong forum is organized by the liberal Center for American Progress Action Fund and the Service Employees International Union. It's expected to focus on wages and working people's issues as union leaders and their supporters worry the 2020 field of at least 20 Democrats is spending too much time talking about esoteric issues rather than about bread-and-butter concerns.

Just this week, several Democratic contenders debated whether criminals in prison should be able to win back their right to vote, the type of issue that some union leaders worry has nothing to do with the economic issues that motivate some working-class voters. It's that anxiety that's fueling Joe Biden's newly launched presidential campaign.

The former vice president will not be in Las Vegas on Saturday but will hold his first public event on Monday at a union hall in Pittsburgh. He's expected to scoop up a major endorsement from the International Association of Fire Fighters while calling to bolster the middle class.

While labor has long made up a key pillar of the Democratic Party, many white working-class voters and swing-state union members supported Republican Donald Trump in 2016. Democrats are working to win back those voters, but party leaders and union members are cautioning candidates that they need to be talking about issues that matter to working families.

"I don't think you can ever have enough" discussion of those issues, former Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid told reporters during a press call Thursday.

The longtime Democratic Nevada senator said that despite record-low unemployment, "we have so many people unemployed or underemployed." He said he hopes candidates at Saturday's event can focus on ways to deal with automation and the so-called skills gap between what employers want and what job candidates know.

While much of the Democratic conversation has centered on liberal touchstones like "Medicare for All" and the Green New Deal climate change plan, some of the White House contenders speaking in Las Vegas on Saturday have made concerted union appeals.

Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota, speaking to hundreds of airline and rail workers at a union convention in Las Vegas earlier this month, pledged to enforce prevailing wage laws. Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts joined striking Stop & Shop workers on a picket line in New Hampshire this month, and Sen. Kamala Harris of California hired a top Service Employees International Union executive for her campaign.

Former Texas Rep. Beto O'Rourke, former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper and former Obama administration housing chief Julian Castro are also scheduled to speak at Saturday's event.

The Service Employees International Union is one of the country's largest unions, with about 2 million members. The union said it would consider endorsing a candidate who commits to making it easier for workers to join a union, supports a $15 minimum wage and goes beyond just walking a picket line with workers by shadowing them at work.

SEIU International President Mary Kay Henry said the union has no timeline for an endorsement but does not expect one soon. Henry said Democratic presidential candidates have discussed fragments of the issues faced by working people, such as affordable child care or health care, but have generally not yet dived into "a comprehensive set of actions that we think the next president can take that would commit to ending poverty wage work in this nation."

Henry said that includes discussions about "unrigging the rules" of the economy, holding corporations accountable and strengthening unions.

"You can't really make progress or have the power to improve kitchen-table issues like wages, affordable health care, affordable child care and a secure retirement unless we figure out a way for millions more people to get a seat at the table and be able to bargain," she said.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/2020-candidates-to-pitch-working-class-credentials-to-union/ar-BBWkYVD?ocid=UE13DHP
0 Replies
 
mark noble
 
  -1  
Reply Sat 27 Apr, 2019 06:29 am
'Divide And Conquer'.

(If One) Accepts a 'label' = (One) Opposes ALL OTHER LABELS (Not 'Shouting'. Enhancing primary context.)

All's Well:)
Real Music
 
  2  
Reply Sat 27 Apr, 2019 01:49 pm
@mark noble,
Quote:
'Divide And Conquer'.

What are you talking about?
Who or what are you referring to?



Quote:
(If One) Accepts a 'label' = (One) Opposes ALL OTHER LABELS (Not 'Shouting'. Enhancing primary context.)

Huh. What does any of this even mean?
What are you talking about?
Real Music
 
  2  
Reply Sat 27 Apr, 2019 03:29 pm
Democratic presidential candidates (pledge) to bolster unions.


Published April 27, 2019
Quote:
LAS VEGAS — Democratic presidential candidates declared unions to be a lifeline for the American middle class and pledged Saturday to strengthen workers' rights to strike and organize and to raise the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour.

But while the candidates decried the erosion of wages and union power in the U.S., the opening speakers at a Las Vegas union forum offered only a few specifics on what policies they'd offer to bolster union ranks and raise pay.

California Sen. Kamala Harris and Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar said they would crack down on corporations that try to undercut labor organizing, and Harris pledged to a McDonald's worker in a union campaign that, as president, she would press the fast food giant to treat its workers better.

Klobuchar pitched her plan to require most companies to make a minimum retirement contribution for employees of at least 50 cents per hour and tougher enforcement of anti-trust laws to combat large corporations consolidating power. And former Texas congressman Beto O'Rourke said he'd try to sell conservatives on a $15 minimum wage by making the case that employees who don't have to juggle a second job to make ends meet are much more productive.

Three other candidates — Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper and former Obama housing chief Julian Castro — were scheduled to speak Saturday afternoon at the event organized by the liberal Center for American Progress Action Fund and the Service Employees International Union.

Their pitch to show solidary with workers comes as union leaders and their backers worry that the 2020 field of at least 20 Democratic contenders is not spending enough time on bread-and-butter concerns.

Labor is a pillar of the Democratic Party, but many white working-class voters and union members in swing states backed Republican Donald Trump in 2016. Democrats are working to win back those voters in the next presidential election, but party leaders and union members are telling candidates that they need to talk about issues that matter to working families.

That concern is helping propel former Vice President Joe Biden's newly launched campaign.

Much of the Democratic conversation has centered on liberal ideas such as "Medicare for All" and the Green New Deal climate change plan. But some of the White House contenders speaking in Las Vegas have made concerted union appeals. Warren joined striking Stop & Shop workers on a picket line in New Hampshire this month, and Harris hired a top official from the service employees union for her campaign.

The union, one of the country's largest, has about 2 million members. The union said it would consider endorsing a candidate who commits to making it easier for workers to join a union, supports more than doubling the federal minimum wage to $15 and spends substantial time getting to know workers and what they do on the job — not just walking a picket line for a photo opportunity.

The union's president, Mary Kay Henry, said it has no timeline for an endorsement and does not expect one soon.

Henry said the candidates have discussed fragments of the issues faced by working people, such as affordable child care or health care, but generally have not focused on "a comprehensive set of actions that we think the next president can take that would commit to ending poverty wage work in this nation."

Henry said that includes discussions about "unrigging the rules" of the economy, holding corporations accountable and strengthening unions.

She said: "You can't really make progress or have the power to improve kitchen-table issues like wages, affordable health care, affordable child care and a secure retirement unless we figure out a way for millions more people to get a seat at the table and be able to bargain."

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/democratic-presidential-candidates-pledge-to-bolster-unions/ar-BBWl1Li?ocid=UE13DHP
0 Replies
 
mark noble
 
  0  
Reply Sat 4 May, 2019 05:49 am
@Real Music,
Pavlov's Dog.

Plato's cave

Your reality

My analysis thereof.
0 Replies
 
MyParentsAreProud
 
  -3  
Reply Fri 10 May, 2019 08:16 pm
@Real Music,
Wouldn´t it be better if we just keep all of those states red? The last thing we need is to have a democrat sneaking into the White House now that Trump has the country on the right track.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 May, 2019 08:59 pm
@MyParentsAreProud,
You sound so serious.
glitterbag
 
  3  
Reply Fri 10 May, 2019 09:02 pm
@MyParentsAreProud,
Welcome to A2K.
0 Replies
 
 

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