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Volume #59/ The Rainforest Spring!

 
 
Stradee
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Apr, 2005 08:17 pm
SUMAC??????????

Hurray, you've returned!

So glad seeing your post again at the rainforest thread!

We missed your face!

Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy
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Stradee
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Apr, 2005 08:24 pm
summie, a new computer? now how cool is that! Very Happy

Do you just luv the new technology?
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sumac
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Apr, 2005 08:43 pm
Hope this one will last me a long time. The only way to go now adays is to buy it pieces at a time, or as a kit, from tigerdirect.com. Put it together with the help of someone who has done it before and you will always be able to do it again. Or replace a component. No more paying through the nose. Really good processor and motherboard, 120 gig HD, new case, new CD-ROM, 512 MB RAM, fans, new keyboard, mouse, graphics card. With shipping and taxes, and after rebates, it came to only $250. Put in my old CD-RW and floppy drives.

New ISP too, for those interested: [email protected]. Now to try to repair old, corrupted hard drive that went when everything else went.
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Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Apr, 2005 08:53 pm
Has anybody reported yet on the fact that the ivory-billed woodpecker, long thought to be exctinct, has been rediscovered somehere, I believe, in an Arkansas swamp? If not, I'll hunt up a link.
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sumac
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Apr, 2005 08:56 pm
It was on the news tonight, MA, so should also be on MSNBC.
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sumac
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Apr, 2005 08:59 pm
Lions, tigers, bears, whales, woodpeckers are all very sexy, but I am VERY worried about the fact that this country lost half of its honey bees in less than one year, and our song birds are also in deep trouble for various reasons.
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sumac
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Apr, 2005 09:12 pm
Let's see if this is too large to post. My Lady Banks yellow rose today. Will try for close-up tomorrow.

http://images.kodakgallery.com/photos1180/4/68/74/36/11/0/11367468407_0_SM.jpg
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sumac
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Apr, 2005 09:14 pm
No fair. That was less than 100 x 100 pixels. Can't remember the maximum size here though.
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sumac
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Apr, 2005 09:16 pm
Oops, and in it pops. Will get closer look.
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Stradee
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Apr, 2005 09:53 pm
Merry, here's the story from National Geographic.com

"Extinct" Woodpecker Found in Arkansas, Experts Say

James Owen
for National Geographic News

April 28, 2005
For 50 years the ivory-billed woodpecker has been widely considered extinct. But the Elvis of the bird-watching world is alive in eastern Arkansas, bird experts announced today. (Watch a video on the discovery from the Nature Conservancy [requires Windows Media Player].)

Ornithologists reported the bird's rediscovery in a remote area of wetland forest.

The discovery "is huge, just huge," said Frank Gill, senior ornithologist at the New York City-based National Audubon Society. "It is kind of like finding Elvis."

"Through the 20th century it's been every birder's fantasy to catch a glimpse of this bird, however remote the possibility," added John W. Fitzpatrick, director of the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in Ithaca, New York. "This really is the holy grail."

Among the world's largest woodpeckers, the ivory-bill is one of six North American bird species suspected or known to have gone extinct since 1880. The last conclusive sighting of the woodpecker was in Louisiana in 1944.

The black-and- white bird's disappearance followed extensive logging in the southeastern U.S., which decimated the woodpecker's habitat of mature virgin forests.

Since then this charismatic species has become the Elvis of the bird world, with whisperings over the years that it might still be alive in some secret hideaway. Experts remained highly skeptical. That is, until now.

Eight independent sightings have been reported since early 2004 in the Big Woods region of eastern Arkansas, a 550,000-acre (220,000- hectare) corridor of swamps and floodplain forests. The reports all came within five miles (three kilometers) of one another.

Key features of the sighted birds, including size and markings, all point to the long-lost woodpecker, according to Fitzpatrick.

Fitzpatrick headed a team that assessed the woodpecker sightings. Their findings will be published in the journal Science.

First Sighting

The first report came in February 2004, when a kayaker spotted what's described as "an unusually large, red-crested woodpecker flying towards him and landing near the base of a tree 20 meters [about 22 yards] away."

"He noticed enough of the markings to suspect it was an ivory-billed woodpecker," Fitzpatrick said.

At least seven further visual encounters occurred over the next year. Crucially, one sighting was captured on video. "It's a pretty crumby video, yet remarkable and historic," Fitzpatrick added. "It had all the necessary ingredients for a definitive identification."

Though the images are fleeting and blurred, extensive analysis of the video by Fitzpatrick and his team revealed the telltale features of an ivory-bill:

• The bird's size matched the species's estimated 19.5-inch (50-centimeter) length, from beak to tail tip. The length of the tail was particularly revealing.

• The bird's wing patterns, both at rest and in flight, had the black-and-white markings characteristic of an ivory-billed woodpecker.

• The bird's back had a conspicuous area of white plumage.

Fitzpatrick says these key markers clearly distinguish the bird from the smaller but similar- looking pileated woodpecker. Previous unconfirmed reports of ivory- billed woodpeckers in the southern U.S. were considered highly suspect by experts, because pileated woodpeckers are widespread in the region.

So far the presence of only a single ivory-bill male can be confirmed. "We cannot rule out the possibility that all of our fleeting encounters involved the same bird," Fitzpatrick said.

However, he believes other ivery-bills are almost certainly out there. He says the difficulty in detecting them may be due to the bird's extremely low population density. The last known population of ivory-bills, in northeastern Louisiana, had a density of one pair per 6 square miles (16 square kilometers) of forest.

"This discovery raises the possibility that there are other places where this bird persisted through ... the 20th century," Fitzpatrick added.

Once Widespread

Until the 1870s the ivory-bill was widespread, though uncommon, in lowland primary forests of the southeastern U.S. (See a 1938 picture of an ivory-bill on a man's head.) The bird strips the bark off dying trees with its powerful beak to get to insect grubs beneath.

The bird's disappearance coincided with extensive logging throughout the region, which continued up to the 1940s.

Hunting by professional collectors accelerated the extinction of remaining populations until the bird was given up as extinct. The last documented ivory-bill was seen over logged forestland in 1944.

A subspecies of the woodpecker may have survived in Cuba. Experts reported brief sightings of at least two individuals in 1986 and 1987. However, subsequent efforts to confirm the existence of this population failed.

Even if few breeding pairs survive in the Big Woods of Arkansas, the study team says that prospects for population growth look good. Additions to the publicly owned wildlife refuge lands and habitat- restoration efforts are reestablishing the mature hardwood forests in the area.

Currently about a hundred thousand acres (40,470 hectares) of the Big Woods are protected and conserved, according to Scott Simon, director of the Nature Conservancy in Arkansas. There is a plan to conserve and restore an additional 200,000 acres (80,940 hectares) of critical habitat over the next ten years, Simon added.

Fitzpatrick, the Cornell University ornithologist, said, "The bottomland [or floodplain] forests are growing back, so there are places with 4- and 5-foot-diameter [1.2- and 1.5-meter-diameter] trees again, including those that are beginning to die as they get to a mature stature. That's the kind of forest that ivory-bills need.

"The conditions are only going to get better," he added, "so it's possible that the worst for this bird is past, and with proper management these forests could support growing populations again."

Fitzpatrick sees the ivory-bill as a powerful symbol of the forests of the Deep South. "The lure of the wild and the lure of the beauty of birds and the lure of the mysterious-and-possibly-gone is enveloped in the idea of this bird."


http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2005/04/images/050428_extinctwoodpecker.jpg
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sumac
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Apr, 2005 09:58 pm
For sharing photos in various places, organizing them in your computer, altering and improving images - wonderful free combo of programs from Google.

https://secure.hello.com/how_it_works.php
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Stradee
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Apr, 2005 11:17 pm
sumac, thanks for the link! I'm attempting to transfer photos to my isp album storage page. If the sizing remains the same during tranfers to fourm sights, then i'll continue using the network site.

Merry, an interesting "Defenders" page regarding the Ivory Billed Woodpecker...

http://www.birds.cornell.edu/ivory/
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Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Apr, 2005 03:27 am
Thx, Stradee. Fine site. I'm so thrilled that this magnificent bird is not, after all, extinct.
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danon5
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Apr, 2005 09:13 am
Woody Woodpecker is alive and well in Lil Abner's country. Great!!

Thanks for the new site, sumac.

Stradee,
I have thought of another possible reason for our photo transfers turning into thumbnails. It occurred to me that it seemed strange indeed for two separate sites to do the same thing simultaneously. A more reasonable explanation is that the A2K site changed the rules in order to protect itself from the effects of attaching oversized photos and warping the entire page to giant size.

All clicked - me 'n Beff.
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Stradee
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Apr, 2005 11:11 am
G'day all ~

Glad you liked the site, Merry!

Dan, the enlarged photos from our album storage sites are smaller than the photo of the Ivory Bills transfered from the NG site. I believe you were correct saying it's the sites and not the fourms. I noticed also that the URL address from enlarged photos from the msn storage site, has considerably more charachters. Not so when transfering say a photo from a news article, or from another forum.

Thumbnail size

http://sc.groups.msn.com/tn/B4/20/wildllife/1/28.jpg

Enlargment of the same photo's URL
http://www.msnusers.com/_Secure/0TACz*y4YhsKS2t4g9!QReNElaZEUjFXmNzUVf98j618!B8ot1*oi6*NsLNZLIWif5W14B2KAKATyC2EgAS0kc5ipR9qAHMKGQlDQz52jPqd7LQ*wxs!d6Q/2_wolves_land_pg.jpg?dc=4675502028908542260
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teenyboone
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Apr, 2005 12:12 pm
Stradee wrote:
sumac, thanks for the link! I'm attempting to transfer photos to my isp album storage page. If the sizing remains the same during tranfers to fourm sights, then i'll continue using the network site.

Merry, an interesting "Defenders" page regarding the Ivory Billed Woodpecker...

http://www.birds.cornell.edu/ivory/

How about that? I see woodpeckers all the time in Neptune, NJ. Out back of the Legion hall are gigantic mulberry trees, where several make their home. They're on the perimeter of the parking lot and just LOVE the berries and making noise on those hardwood tree, opening a notch for themselves to get into shelter. They are so cute! No need for binoculars here!
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pwayfarer
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Apr, 2005 03:09 pm
Rainforest 59
Yuck. Working with a non-functioning 'puter for a day and a half. Back on line and clicking. Will tend to trying to get photoos posted when my family leaves. What a nice time - both kids are really getting hot on their instruments - piano and guitar for the 12 year old and sax for the 16 year old . It has been a musical treat for grandma! Son Kim came up to give a talk on his Shellfish group. Wish I could vote for him for president.....
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pwayfarer
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Apr, 2005 03:11 pm
Oh, that woodpecker story is so heartening.
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Stradee
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Apr, 2005 07:20 pm
Teeny, in the Sierras during last summer, there were numerous forest fires that have impacted many birds species. The concern now is for the forest service to not take dead trees from the inflicted areas because of the avian ecosystem.

Selectively take the big dead trees, and it will impact a whole host of woodpeckers, including hairy and white-headed and even black-backed woodpeckers. The trees attract insects that provide food for the woodpeckers, and sites where they can excavate nesting cavities, which, in turn, provide homes for other birds, such as mountain bluebirds.

So far I haven't heard or seen the birds during the Spring season, but during the summer months, the sound of woodpeckers foraging for food can be heard echoing through the forest. Sounds so neat!

There's plenty of hummingbirds though, and i've noticed smaller wrens beginning to nest on the property trees, plus a Robbin built a nest on one of the pine tree branches from across the road! Good news!

pwayfarer, nature is marvelous! Smile)
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sumac
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Apr, 2005 08:24 pm
Still getting organized here. Hope to redo my clicking icon tomorrow.
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