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Blakes poem, what does it mean

 
 
Reply Wed 30 Mar, 2005 02:53 am
Blake's "how to know love from deceit"

Love to faults is always blind
always is to joy inclind
lawless winged and unconfined
and breaks all chains from every mind

Deceit to secresy confined
lawful cautious and refined
to ever thing but intrest blind
and forges fetters for the mind

what does it mean???
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Type: Discussion • Score: 0 • Views: 10,843 • Replies: 6
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kendrajean32
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Mar, 2005 02:26 pm
I think that this poem is compairing love and deceit....but showing how closly they are linked. They are a bit of opposites. The first line: love to faults is always blind....is that great idea that we wear rose colored glasses when we are in love - we see not the faults of those around us. That with love - there is no stoping you. You feel like you can do anything....or that you would do anything for love.

Deceit needs to be kept a secret...and it consumes people. Deceit and lies grow...and multiply. The more lies you have- the more you have to lie. Then you begin to spin a web of deceit which will chain you down. You will become a prisoner of your own lies. However, when wearing the rose colored glasses...sometimes Deceit doen't look like deceit- and therefore it gets confused.
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Bella Dea
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Mar, 2005 02:55 pm
Re: Blakes poem, what does it mean
kendrajean32 wrote:
Blake's "how to know love from deceit"

Love to faults is always blind - Love is blind; you don't see the faults or the wrongs. Your "rose colored glasses" comment is right on.

always is to joy inclined - Love makes you feel good and happy all the time.

lawless winged and unconfined - You can break the rules when in love. There are no walls too high, no river too deep.

and breaks all chains from every mind - Love breaks through. It triumphs over everything. It changes minds and hearts. Love changes you.

Deceit to secresy confined - Lies are held inside. We don't tell someone we've lied to them.

lawful cautious and refined - We sculpt our lies and perfect them to make them seem real. A good lie is one that can't be told from the truth.

to ever thing but intrest blind - We turn a blind eye to everything but the lie. We need to focus on it, live it, breathe it, eat the lie.

and forges fetters for the mind - A lie locks you up, chains you to it and you can't think of anything but the lie and how to maintain it.

what does it mean???


That's what I think.
Smile
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dlowan
 
  2  
Reply Thu 31 Mar, 2005 07:11 am
I also think he is saying that love is an ecstatic and illuminating force - that it blasts preconceptions and the blinders of common reality from our eyes - and frees us - although in the power of this experience, it is possible we shall be deceived and hurt - there is risk in this powerful force:

"lawless winged and unconfined"

I think he is not only speaking of romantic love here, but also of the joys of the love of nature, other beings, ideas - enthusiasm and risk generally - and of the transcendence of the spiritual experience of ecsatsy and love.

It gives us wings (is there an echo here of the common image of moths to a flame - I also think of John Donne's famous poem of transcendent love, The canonization:

( http://search.able2know.com/About/3709.html )

"Call her one, me another fly,
We're tapers too, and at our own cost die,"


He contrasts this with the cautious, grey, confined, dim world of ordinary existence - of life without the ecstatic and radical force of surrender to love -

Blake is big on the fetters of the customary thought and religion - "mind-forg'd manacles" as he calls them - and the corrupting effect of "civilisation" on human innocence.

Have a look at Songs of Innocence and Experience, for instance.

Here is a critical introduction to Blake which you may like to have a look at - it explores many of his themes and looks at other poems:

http://www.wwnorton.com/introlit/poetry_blake9.htm

Blake is a joy - have a look at more of his work!
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Rod98168
 
  1  
Reply Tue 31 Aug, 2010 07:54 pm
Love to faults is always blind.
Love even when you know the faults of someone.
Always is to joy inclined.
Love brings joy even with the faults.
Lawless, winged and unconfined.
Love has no boundries or restraints.
And breaks all chains from every mind.
Love overcomes all.
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Reconstructo
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Sep, 2010 04:43 am
@kendrajean32,
Love is forgiving, always sees beauty and the positive. Love is not formal and rule-obsessed, but spontaneous and overflowing. Love isn't obsessed with an exact system of law. Love trusts. Love is present.

But deceit goes with self-righteousness. False religion accuses. True religion is the love of human beings, the seeing of reality as infinite and holy.

Blake likes to contrast courage with cunning. Love is brave and open, maybe a little sloppy. Cunning is secretive, self-obsessed, selfish in the narrow abstract way.

These are just improvised thoughts. Blake is worth a close reading generally. Especially his annotations, which is where he is most direct, most clear. I think he's underrated.
0 Replies
 
kennethamy
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Sep, 2010 08:19 am
@kendrajean32,
kendrajean32 wrote:

Blake's "how to know love from deceit"

Love to faults is always blind
always is to joy inclind
lawless winged and unconfined
and breaks all chains from every mind

Deceit to secresy confined
lawful cautious and refined
to ever thing but intrest blind
and forges fetters for the mind

what does it mean???


This poem may tell us what the difference between love and deceit is, but it certainly does not tell us how to tell whether something is the one or the other. Blake seems to be confusing the question, what is the difference? with the question, how can we tell the difference?
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