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Reply Mon 22 Jan, 2018 06:45 am
I have lived my whole life as of yet in Seoul.

Is this sentence correct?
Thank you!
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Type: Question • Score: 4 • Views: 1,340 • Replies: 13
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Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Mon 22 Jan, 2018 06:48 am
@halpmeh ,
Yes--however, there should be commas setting off "as of yet."

I have lived my whole life, as of yet, in Seoul.
halpmeh
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Jan, 2018 07:33 am
@Setanta,
ah yes, thanks so much!
0 Replies
 
layman
 
  2  
Reply Mon 22 Jan, 2018 08:04 am
@halpmeh ,
halpmeh wrote:

I have lived my whole life as of yet in Seoul.

Is this sentence correct?
Thank you!


Since you've already indicated that the duration is your "whole life," it is redundant to also add "as of yet." "I have lived my whole life in Seoul" would be sufficient and preferable. A more common word order would be "I have lived in Seoul (for) my whole life." Many would insert the word "for" since it usually used in contexts indicating duration. If you had lived there 10 years, you would say "for 10 years," for example. I don't think the "for" would actually be required, though.

An even simpler way to convey the idea would be to say "I've always lived in Seoul." In this context "always" just means "for my whole life," and not eternally, of course.

If you wanted to convey the idea that a change was imminent, or likely, you might say "To date," or "Up until now," I've always lived in Seoul. It wouldn't be redundant in that case, because you're actually adding something of significance.
0 Replies
 
dalehileman
 
  0  
Reply Mon 22 Jan, 2018 11:35 am
@halpmeh ,
Lay's right: "as of yet" 's no good there
0 Replies
 
centrox
 
  2  
Reply Mon 22 Jan, 2018 01:44 pm
The common phrases 'as yet' and 'as of yet' are wordy for 'yet' or 'still' or 'so far'. Using one of these phrases is not an error, but they are verbose.

perennialloner
 
  0  
Reply Mon 22 Jan, 2018 01:59 pm
@halpmeh ,
It's fine. Without context, I would assume from your inclusion of "as of yet" that you mean to suggest that you are uncertain of your future or that you have plans to live elsewhere from Seoul.
layman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Jan, 2018 02:08 pm
@perennialloner,
perennialloner wrote:

It's fine. Without context, I would assume from your inclusion of "as of yet" that you mean to suggest that your future is uncertain or that you have plans to live elsewhere from Seoul.


You can assume that, but I don't, given the entire sentence. I would feel differently if it said something like "I haven't moved from Seoul, as of yet." But the "always lived" portion gives no such impression, as I read it.
perennialloner
 
  0  
Reply Mon 22 Jan, 2018 02:27 pm
@layman,
I don't see why you'd feel differently. But I'd like to hear your rationale if you'd like to give it.
layman
 
  2  
Reply Mon 22 Jan, 2018 03:30 pm
@perennialloner,
perennialloner wrote:

I don't see why you'd feel differently. But I'd like to hear your rationale if you'd like to give it.


Suppose I said: "All my life, to this very day, I have lived in Seoul."

That would most likely be viewed as an expression of loyalty and pride, not an intention to leave in the near future. I don't see the OP as being much different. It could, in theory, be different, I just don't see anything to really suggest that. There is nothing the least bit negative, even hinting at dissatisfaction, in it.

On the other hand, the "I have not yet moved" sentiment suggests otherwise.

perennialloner
 
  0  
Reply Mon 22 Jan, 2018 05:26 pm
@layman,
Huh. Why would it most likely be viewed as an expression of loyalty and pride? Couldn't it just as easily be an expression of dissatisfaction, by a man bemoaning that he has spent every day of his (perhaps very long) life in one city.

Honestly - thinking "all my life, to this very day, I have lived in Seoul" connotes loyalty and pride seems to me a much grosser assumption than thinking the position of "as of yet" suggests an openness to the possibility of living elsewhere, which I would assume on the basis that she wouldn't have pointed out that she has yet to live outside Seoul if she wasn't thinking about living outside Seoul.

I personally think it's kind of insulting to the author to chalk "as of yet" up to redundancy or wordiness and not bother interpreting what it might mean in the context of her sentence.





layman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Jan, 2018 05:36 pm
@perennialloner,
Quote:
Huh. Why would it most likely be viewed as an expression of loyalty and pride? Couldn't it just as easily be an expression of dissatisfaction, by a man bemoaning that he has spent every day of his (perhaps very long) life in one city.


It "could be" anything. It could be that he's saying he hates jews. Since it "could be" anything, then it IS everything. It's whatever you want it to be. Take your pick of what you like best.
0 Replies
 
ekename
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Jan, 2018 05:22 am
"I have lived my whole life as of yet in"

1 google result

"I have always lived in"

352,000 google results
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Jan, 2018 07:08 am
@centrox,
Context can matter, too. One might say "I have lived my whole life, as of yet, in Seoul. The Park family has been urging me to move to Taegu, however, to be near them and for employment opportunities." Or, "But I have been thinking of moving to Pusan, as it is close to Japan, and travel there is less expensive."

I have a fair amount of experience with English language learners, and it is my experience that they want to learn to use the language. They want to use the sentences they thought up, and only want to know if the sentence is grammatically acceptable. They don't want you to re-write the sentence for them.
0 Replies
 
 

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