0
   

Tone with sarcasm or with compliment?

 
 
Reply Mon 17 Feb, 2003 05:41 am
As a slang, the word "riot" means "An irresistibly funny person or thing", for example:
Isn't she a riot?
I have checked out some dictionary indicates that the slang "riot" means "An very interesting person or thing".
Usually "funny" is pronounced in a tone with sarcasm, or the word "funny" is a negative one; while "interesting" is pronounced in a tone with compliment, meaning positive.
What do you think of the slang "riot"? Do you think that the sentence "Isn't she a riot?" is sarcastic or complimentary?
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Discussion • Score: 0 • Views: 6,543 • Replies: 11
No top replies

 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 17 Feb, 2003 05:45 am
Would depend entirely on tone of voice - and context. Could be either a very complimentary statement, or a derogatory one.
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 17 Feb, 2003 05:45 am
Funny can be very good, too.
0 Replies
 
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Mon 17 Feb, 2003 09:53 am
As far as I am concerned, there is but one example which proves "funny" can be very good:
When speaking of a joke, the audience remarks: "very funny!". It is a compliment no doubt.
I'd like to know if you think so.
0 Replies
 
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 17 Feb, 2003 09:59 am
No, I've said "Very funny" with a contradictory expression to my husband when he's told a baaaaaaaaaaad joke. Wink

The problem with sarcasm is that it is often in the intonation and expression. The same exact words, printed on the screen, can be straightforward or sarcastic.

I've definitely seen people use "she's a riot!" in a complimentary way. ("Have you met our new receptionist? She's a riot!")
0 Replies
 
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Mon 17 Feb, 2003 12:14 pm
With contradictory expression, you could say "very good" or whatever. Smile
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 17 Feb, 2003 02:47 pm
Yep. I have often heard "you are funny", or he/she is funny used as a compliment Oristar - I am not sure where you got the idea that it is normally derogatory. It CAN be - again it is all in the tone.
0 Replies
 
husker
 
  1  
Reply Mon 17 Feb, 2003 03:00 pm
How bout'n if you are "Special" ???
0 Replies
 
gezzy
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Feb, 2003 03:33 am
Saying you're a riot can be meant in both ways. I usually use it to compliment someone or something that I think is funny, but if someone said something to me that I didn't like, I may also respond by saying "oh yeah, you're a real riot!".
0 Replies
 
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Feb, 2003 07:01 am
dlowan wrote:
Yep. I have often heard "you are funny", or he/she is funny used as a compliment Oristar - I am not sure where you got the idea that it is normally derogatory. It CAN be - again it is all in the tone.


Not to mention those who, at least that I have met, used to jeer at others with the word "funny", let's see the definition of "funny":
Funny
adj.
(1) Causing laughter or amusement, e.g.

He has funny habit of blinking when talking with others.
(2) Intended or designed to amuse, e.g.
A funny joke.
(3) Strangely or suspiciously odd; curious, e.g.
It's a funny thing, but she put the ring on the dressing table a few minutes ago, and now it's missing.
There's sth. funny about the telephone; it won't work.
What can that funny noise be?

(4) Tricky or deceitful, e.g.
Don't get funny with me.
They had got together the whole evening, and I knew there was something funny going on.
(5) Sick, e.g.
She felt a bit funny.

So the word seems mostly a derogatory adjective, while the word "interesting" just means:
Arousing or holding the attention; absorbing, e.g.
An interesting story book for children.
In an interesting condition [situation].
0 Replies
 
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Feb, 2003 07:03 am
gezzy wrote:
Saying you're a riot can be meant in both ways. I usually use it to compliment someone or something that I think is funny, but if someone said something to me that I didn't like, I may also respond by saying "oh yeah, you're a real riot!".


Things will develop in the opposite direction when they become extreme...
0 Replies
 
gezzy
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Feb, 2003 07:16 am
OristarA
Very true.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

deal - Question by WBYeats
Drs. = female doctor? - Question by oristarA
Let pupils abandon spelling rules, says academic - Discussion by Robert Gentel
Please, I need help. - Question by imsak
Is this sentence grammatically correct? - Question by Sydney-Strock
"come from" - Question by mcook
 
  1. Forums
  2. » Tone with sarcasm or with compliment?
Copyright © 2019 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 03/26/2019 at 05:58:53