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question about using apostrophe's for possession

 
 
Reply Mon 13 Mar, 2017 02:12 pm
when you qualify an object of a sentence that you wish to be possessive, is it acceptable to place the apostrophe on the last of the qualifying words?

I had trouble with wording my question, but essentially this example is doubly possessive, and something people often say but is rarely written (I think).

I've heard that this form is looked down upon: That country's chef's cooking is sublime,

so is this better: The chef of that country's cooking is sublime. Is it acceptable to write this?

Thanks.
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Type: Question • Score: 0 • Views: 862 • Replies: 9
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centrox
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Mar, 2017 02:21 pm
@perennialloner,
perennialloner wrote:
I've heard that this form is looked down upon: That country's chef's cooking is sublime

That is fine. Whoever told you otherwise is mistaken.

perennialloner wrote:
The chef of that country's cooking is sublime. Is it acceptable to write this?

It's awful.

0 Replies
 
dalehileman
 
  -3  
Reply Mon 13 Mar, 2017 02:21 pm
@perennialloner,
Peren I'm not sure which q I should answer but the last two seem okay tho as you say the first seems a bit awkward

Cen, Fil, Punk, Oli help

Quote:
The chef of that country's cooking is sublime
Still doesn't seem right somehow; we're not sure whether it's a chef of a country or a chef of cooking

Help help
centrox
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Mar, 2017 02:22 pm
@dalehileman,
dalehileman wrote:
we're not sure whether it's a chef of a country or a chef of cooking

Exactly. When describing successive or cascading possessive situations, you can either use the apostrophe plus a letter s style, with the ultimately possessed object last: my mother's friend's daughter's boyfriend, or you can use the 'of' construction with the order reversed: the boyfriend of the daughter of the friend of my mother. Trouble comes when you try to mix them.
dalehileman
 
  -2  
Reply Mon 13 Mar, 2017 02:27 pm
@centrox,
Why, thank you Cen, I thought I might be losing it entirely
0 Replies
 
centrox
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Mar, 2017 03:17 pm
By the way, perennialloner, there is a wrong use of an apostrophe in your title for this thread:

Quote:
question about using apostrophe's for possession

This is illiterate, and is an example of what is often called the "greengrocer's apostrophe".
0 Replies
 
dalehileman
 
  -2  
Reply Mon 13 Mar, 2017 03:28 pm
@perennialloner,
Quote:
wrong use of an apostrophe
What Cen means, Loner, is that there just shoudn't be one

However the plural get very complicated

https://www.google.com/?client=safari&channel=mac_bm#channel=mac_bm&q=apostrophe+s+or+ies&*
perennialloner
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Mar, 2017 03:57 pm
@dalehileman,
Thank you, Dale. I know what he means. It was a mistake. Not one I usually make. I think my mind was just on apostrophes since that's what the question was about. And thank you both for your help. I understand the issue and will not use that form.
dalehileman
 
  0  
Reply Mon 13 Mar, 2017 04:06 pm
@perennialloner,
Quote:
Thank you, Dale

Nial you're most welcome, wish we could be of more help
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Mar, 2017 05:39 pm
@perennialloner,
Just to add, when using its, only use an apostrophe when short for it is.

Eg. It's a cat, these are its whiskers.

0 Replies
 
 

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