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English Expression

 
 
Reply Sat 7 Jan, 2017 12:33 am
I have a question about this expression "you are going to hate me".
Does this phrase work as an apology/carrying to mean offeing apologies?

We were arranging a meeting over coffee but this person cancelled at the last minute. He started off saying "you are going to hate me" and explained what happened. Since he didn't offer any apologies I mentioned this then he said since he gave this expression, he thought he already apologised. To me, it was mere warning of the bad news coming.

Please let me know your interpretation on this phrase/context, thank you.
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Type: Question • Score: 2 • Views: 262 • Replies: 11
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roger
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Jan, 2017 12:55 am
@ChocolatChaud0,
I would take it as an informal apology. It's moderately common and more or less means "Please don't be upset or angry".
ChocolatChaud0
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Jan, 2017 01:31 am
@roger,
Thank you roger for your reply. I agree that this expression does have what you said of dont feel angry, etc. My other friends and I always use this phrase before asking something awkward/cancelling, etc. but usually followed by a proper apologies or thank you (for understanding, etc). So asked this question here.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Jan, 2017 01:44 am
@ChocolatChaud0,
I would also rather hear a real apology, but that's pretty much the way it is used.
0 Replies
 
dalehileman
 
  -3  
Reply Sat 7 Jan, 2017 02:23 pm
@ChocolatChaud0,
Quote:
as ..to mean offeing apologies?
Not necessarily, Choco. Now you are going to hate me, but it was I who turned you in. Not by any means telling you this as an apology, but only because it's essential you know if only for your own defense

Thus Chaud I'd agree/w/ur interp
0 Replies
 
selectmytutor
 
  -3  
Reply Fri 20 Jan, 2017 05:42 am
@ChocolatChaud0,
No, this phrase doesn't mean apologies.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Jan, 2017 05:20 am
@ChocolatChaud0,
Ignore Select My Tutor. Not native English speaking, probably a bot.
dalehileman
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 3 Feb, 2017 01:04 pm
@izzythepush,
Forgive me Izz but is 'Select My Tutor' a thread and if so could you provide a link

Then how does it relate to our 'English Expression'

And most embarrassed (for reasons I'm sure you can guess): What's a 'bot'
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Fri 3 Feb, 2017 01:28 pm
@dalehileman,
No, Select My Tutor is the person/bot who posted above me on this thread.

Bot, short for robot, a computer programme that imitates a person online,
dalehileman
 
  0  
Reply Fri 3 Feb, 2017 01:33 pm
@izzythepush,
Thanks Iz, I'm today's idiot bot
0 Replies
 
PUNKEY
 
  1  
Reply Fri 3 Feb, 2017 02:33 pm
"you are going to hate me" is an introductory phrase (idiom) that means, "I need to tell you something that will make you upset, but here it is . . ."

dalehileman
 
  0  
Reply Fri 3 Feb, 2017 03:32 pm
@PUNKEY,
Punk, Good'n'
0 Replies
 
 

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