7
   

Proof Hillary Clinton sold influence for donations to foundation ...

 
 
Reply Wed 7 Sep, 2016 05:41 am
OOPS! I mean Donald tRump.

Trump Held Fundraiser For Pam Bondi At Mar-a-Lago After She Dropped Investigation
Source: huff post

The Republican Party of Florida paid much less for the venue than Trump’s own campaign has paid.


09/06/2016 10:30 pm ET | Updated 5 minutes ago


WASHINGTON ― In March 2014, Donald Trump opened his 126-room Palm Beach resort, Mar-a-Lago, for a $3,000-per-person fundraiser for Pam Bondi, the Florida attorney general who had recently decided not to investigate Trump University and was facing a tough re-election campaign.

Trump, whose personal foundation had given $25,000 to a pro-Bondi group the previous fall, did not write a check to the attorney general that night. But by hosting her at Mar-a-Lago and bringing in some of his own high-profile Florida contacts, he provided her campaign with a nice financial boost.

Trump has claimed that Bondi was merely a candidate he knew well and supported politically. But his fundraising efforts were extensive: In addition to the $25,000 donation, Trump and his daughter Ivanka gave $500 each to Bondi in the fall of 2013. The following year, Ivanka and her father donated a total of $125,000 to the Republican Party of Florida.


All this monetary effort could suggest that Donald Trump was thanking Bondi for not probing his failed seminar program. His efforts to boost her politically came during and after a period when she was being publicly pressed to investigate claims that get-rich-quick seminars bearing his name were defrauding participants.
.....................



Read more: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/donald-trump-pam-bondi-trump-university_us_57cf2c6ce4b0a48094a64854
 
McGentrix
 
  -2  
Reply Wed 7 Sep, 2016 06:59 am
Trump is not Secretary of State.
bobsal u1553115
 
  3  
Reply Wed 7 Sep, 2016 06:16 pm
@McGentrix,
Quote:
Trump is not Secretary of State.


No. He was bribing public officials in eight or so states to have legal proceedings over tax evasion schemes dropped.

And NOBODY can demonstrate any sort of quid pro quo with anything Hillary Clinton did. Unlike Microsoft having their antitrust actions dropped after MS AND Bill Gates donated to GWB in 2000.
McGentrix
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 12 Sep, 2016 09:21 pm
@bobsal u1553115,
bobsal u1553115 wrote:

And NOBODY can demonstrate any sort of quid pro quo with anything Hillary Clinton did.


Maybe you understand quid pro quo differently than I do?

If you pay a lot of money to the Clinton Foundation, you can meet with the Secretary of State and discuss whatever you wish to. Money is the quid, time alone is pro quo.

You don't really think she deleted 33,000 emails about wedding plans do you? I have every email I have ever sent and it's no where near 33,000.
RABEL222
 
  2  
Reply Tue 13 Sep, 2016 12:14 am
@McGentrix,
Actual proof?
0 Replies
 
bobsal u1553115
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 Sep, 2016 03:40 am
@McGentrix,
Quote:
You don't really think she deleted 33,000 emails about wedding plans do you? I have every email I have ever sent and it's no where near 33,000.


Dick Cheney's missing SEVEN MILLION e-mails must have given you the vapors.


updated 2/27/2008 12:34:27 PM ET

http://www.nbcnews.com/id/23367672/ns/politics-capitol_hill/t/cheneys-subpoenaed-e-mails-missing/#.V9fIz60X-7c

WASHINGTON — When Special Counsel Patrick Fitzgerald wanted to find out what was going on inside Vice President Dick Cheney's office, the prosecutor in the CIA leak probe made a logical move. He dropped a grand jury subpoena on the White House for all the relevant e-mail.

One problem: Even though White House computer technicians hunted high and low, an entire week's worth of e-mail from Cheney's office was missing. The week was Sept. 30, 2003, to Oct. 6, 2003, the opening days of the Justice Department's probe into whether anyone at the White House leaked the identity of CIA operative Valerie Plame.

That episode was part of the picture that unfolded Tuesday on Capitol Hill, where Democrats on a House committee released new information about one of the Bush White House's long-running issues, its problem-plagued e-mail system.

Email recovery
For the first time, a former White House computer technician went public with the details. Steven McDevitt revealed in written statements submitted to Congress how a plan was developed to try to recover the missing e-mail for Fitzgerald.

Ultimately, 250 pages of electronic messages were retrieved from the personal e-mail accounts of officials in Cheney's office, but whether that amounted to all the relevant e-mail is a question that may never be answered.

McDevitt made clear that it was a sensitive issue inside the White House.

"I worked with ... White House Counsel on efforts to provide an explanation to the special prosecutor," McDevitt wrote. "This included providing a briefing to the special prosecutor's staff on this subject."
Advertise

McDevitt provided no details of the meetings with White House Counsel Harriet Miers and others in the counsel's office in late 2005 and early 2006. The White House refused to comment on those meetings.

White House on defensive
The White House put the best face on a bad hearing Tuesday of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, defending the administration's handling of its electronic messages.

McDevitt said that one estimate from a 2005 analysis was that more than 1,000 days of e-mail were missing from January 2003 to Aug. 10, 2005. McDevitt said "the process by which e-mail was being collected and retained was primitive and the risk that data would be lost was high." The "low end" estimate was about 470 days, he added.

The White House says a substantial amount of what had been believed to be missing e-mail had been located.

"We are very energized about getting to the bottom of this" issue, Theresa Payton, chief information officer at the White House Office of Administration, testified to the committee.

"This is a form of sandbagging," replied Oversight Committee Chairman Henry Waxman, D-Calif., who pointed out that by the time the White House fixes its e-mail problems, "you'll be out of office."

E-mail shortcomings
McDevitt's statements detailed shortcomings that he said have plagued the White House e-mail system for six years. He said:

The White House had no complete inventory of e-mail files.
There was no automatic system to ensure that e-mail was archived and preserved.
Until mid-2005 the e-mail system had serious security flaws, in which "everyone" on the White House computer network had access to e-mail. McDevitt wrote that the "potential impact" of the security flaw was that there was no way to verify that retained data had not been modified.
A new e-mail archiving system that would have addressed the problems was "ready to go live" on Aug. 21, 2006.

Payton told Waxman's committee she canceled the new system in late 2006 because it would have required modifications and additional spending. An alternative system is under way, she said.

Payton's predecessor, Carlos Solari, told the House committee that he was puzzled that the new system had been rejected and that he had "absolutely" believed that the system Payton rejected would be implemented.

When President Bush leaves office, presidential records and federal records at the White House will be turned over to the National Archives. Waxman produced a memo pointing to a lack of cooperation between the White House and the Archives.

"We still know virtually nothing about the status of the alleged missing White House e-mails," the Archives' general counsel, Gary Stern, wrote to his boss last September.

Copyright 2008 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bush_White_House_email_controversy

Bush White House email controversy

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from Bush White House e-mail controversy)

The Bush White House email controversy surfaced in 2007 during the controversy involving the dismissal of eight U.S. attorneys. Congressional requests for administration documents while investigating the dismissals of the U.S. attorneys required the Bush administration to reveal that not all internal White House emails were available. Conducting governmental business in this manner is a possible violation of the Presidential Records Act of 1978.[1] Over 5 million emails may have been lost.[2][3] Greg Palast claims to have come up with 500 of the Karl Rove emails, leading to damaging allegations.[4] In 2009, it was announced that as many as 22 million emails may have been lost.[5]

The administration officials had been using a private Internet domain, called gwb43.com, owned by and hosted on an email server run by the Republican National Committee,[6] for various communications of unknown content or purpose. The domain name is an abbreviation for "George W. Bush, 43rd" President of the United States. The use of this email domain became public when it was discovered that J. Scott Jennings, the White House's deputy director of political affairs, was using a gwb43.com email address to discuss the firing of the U.S. attorney for Arkansas.[7] Communications by federal employees were also found on georgewbush.com (registered to "Bush-Cheney '04, Inc."[8]) and rnchq.org (registered to "Republican National Committee"[9]), but, unlike these two servers, gwb43.com has no Web server connected to it — it is used only for email.[10]

The "gwb43.com"[11] domain name was publicized by Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW), who sent a letter to Oversight and Government Reform Committee committee chairman Henry A. Waxman requesting an investigation.[12] Waxman sent a formal warning to the RNC, advising them to retain copies of all emails sent by White House employees. According to Waxman, "in some instances, White House officials were using nongovernmental accounts specifically to avoid creating a record of the communications."[13] The Republican National Committee claims to have erased the emails, supposedly making them unavailable for Congressional investigators.[14]

On April 12, 2007, White House spokesman Scott Stanzel stated that White House staffers were told to use RNC accounts to "err on the side of avoiding violations of the Hatch Act, but they should also retain that information so it can be reviewed for the Presidential Records Act," and that "some employees ... have communicated about official business on those political email accounts."[15] Stanzel also said that even though RNC policy since 2004 has been to retain all emails of White House staff with RNC accounts, the staffers had the ability to delete the email themselves.


Use by senior White House staff

According to a former White House official, Karl Rove used RNC-hosted addresses for roughly "95 percent" of his email.[16] Rove provided email from his [email protected][17] address in exhibits to the United States House Committee on the Judiciary.[18]

White House deputy Jennifer Farley told Jack Abramoff not to use the official White House system "because it might actually limit what they can do to help us, especially since there could be lawsuits, etc."[7] Abramoff responded, "Dammit. It was sent to Susan on her RNC pager and was not supposed to go into the WH system."[19]
Investigations with missing emails
House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform

The House Oversight committee in an interim staff report, released on June 18, 2007:[20]

At least eighty-eight Republican National Committee email accounts were granted to senior Bush administration officials, not "just a handful" as previously reported by the White House spokesperson Dana Perino in March 2007. Her estimate was later revised to "about fifty." Officials with accounts included: Karl Rove, the President’s senior advisor; Andrew Card, the former White House Chief of Staff; Ken Mehlman, the former White House Director of Political Affairs; and many other officials in the Office of Political Affairs, the Office of Communications, and the Office of the Vice President.
The RNC has 140,216 emails sent or received by Karl Rove. Over half of these emails (75,374) were sent to or received from individuals using official ".gov" email accounts. Other users of RNC email accounts include former Director of Political Affairs Sara Taylor (66,018 emails) and Deputy Director of Political Affairs Scott Jennings (35,198 emails). These email accounts were used by White House officials for official purposes, such as communicating with federal agencies about federal appointments and policies.
Of the 88 White House officials who received RNC email accounts, the RNC has preserved no emails for 51 officials.
There is evidence that the Office of White House Counsel under Alberto Gonzales may have known that White House officials were using RNC email accounts for official business, but took no action to preserve these presidential records.
The evidence obtained by the Committee indicates that White House officials used their RNC email accounts in a manner that circumvented these requirements. At this point in the investigation, it is not possible to determine precisely how many presidential records may have been destroyed by the RNC. Given the heavy reliance by White House officials on RNC email accounts, the high rank of the White House officials involved, and the large quantity of missing emails, the potential violation of the Presidential Records Act may be extensive.

Dismissal of U.S. attorneys controversy

Articles

Timeline
Summary of attorneys
Documents
Congressional hearings
List of dismissed attorneys
Complete list of related articles

G. W. Bush administration officials involved

Fred F. Fielding, White House Counsel
William K. Kelley, Deputy White House Counsel
William Moschella, Principal Associate Deputy Attorney General
Brett Tolman, U.S. Attorney, District of Utah, former counsel to Senate Judiciary Committee
Mary Beth Buchanan, U.S. Attorney, Western District of Pennsylvania, former Director of the Executive Office for U.S. Attorneys from 2004 to 2005

Involved administration officials who resigned

Alberto Gonzales, United States Attorney General, former White House Counsel
Kyle Sampson, Chief of Staff to the Attorney General
Michael A. Battle, Director of the Executive Office for U.S. Attorneys
Michael Elston, Chief of Staff to the Deputy Attorney General
Monica Goodling, Justice Department's liaison to the White House
William W. Mercer, U.S. Attorney, Acting Associate Attorney General (retains position as U.S. Attorney in Montana)
Sara Taylor, Deputy Assistant to the President and Director of Political Affairs
Paul McNulty, Deputy Attorney General
Harriet Miers, former White House Counsel (resigned prior to publicity surrounding the controversy, effective January 31, 2007)
Karl Rove, White House Deputy Chief of Staff
Bradley Schlozman, Director Executive Office for U.S. Attorneys; former Acting Assistant Attorney General for, and later Principal Deputy Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division; former interim U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Missouri

U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary
110th Congress

Patrick Leahy, Chair (D)
Arlen Specter, Ranking member, former Chair (R)
Chuck Schumer, Chair: Subcommittee on Administrative Oversight and the Courts (D)

U.S. House Committee on the Judiciary
110th Congress

John Conyers, Chair (D)
Lamar Smith, Ranking member (R)
Linda Sánchez, Chair: Subcommittee on Commercial and Administrative Law (D)

Main article: Dismissal of U.S. attorneys controversy

During the investigation into the firing of eight U.S. attorneys,[21] it became known White House staff was using Republican National Committee (RNC) email accounts.[22] The White House stated it might have lost five million emails.[2]

On May 2, 2007, the Senate Judiciary Committee issued a subpoena to Attorney General Alberto Gonzales and the Department of Justice (DOJ) compelling the production of email Karl Rove sent to DOJ staff, regarding evaluation and dismissal of attorneys, no matter what email account Rove used, whether White House or National Republican party accounts, or other accounts, with a deadline of May 15, 2007 for compliance. The subpoena also demanded relevant email previously produced in the Valerie Plame controversy and investigation for the CIA leak scandal (2003).[23]
CIA leak grand jury investigation
Main articles: CIA leak scandal, CIA leak grand jury investigation, and Niger uranium forgeries

Ambassador Joseph C. Wilson alleged that his wife's identity was covert and that members of the George W. Bush administration knowingly revealed that information as retribution for his New York Times op-ed entitled "What I Didn't Find in Africa," of July 6, 2003, regarding the claim that Saddam Hussein was seeking uranium.[citation needed] Patrick J. Fitzgerald, while investigating the leak, found that emails were missing from the White House server.[24][25] Mother Jones wrote that this is possibly the reason the RNC changed the policy of deleting emails after 30 days to saving all email sent and received by White House officials.[25] In light of the apparent vanished emails Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW) has asked to reopen the investigation.[26][27]
General Services Administration
Main article: General Services Administration

It is feared that the missing emails might also affect congressional investigation of General Services Administration.[28]
Department of Education
Main article: United States Department of Education

While investigating the Reading First program CREW learned that employees use private emails to conduct official business. This might be a violation of the Federal Records Act.[29][30]
Legalities
The Hatch Act
Main article: Hatch Act of 1939

The Hatch Act prohibits the use of government resources, including email accounts, for political purposes. The Bush administration stated the RNC accounts were used to prevent violation of this Act.[2][25]
Presidential Records Act
Main article: Presidential Records Act

The Presidential Records Act mandates the preservation of all presidential records. Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington and the Wall Street Journal contend that the missing emails may constitute a violation of this Act.[1][2][26][31]
0 Replies
 
bobsal u1553115
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 Sep, 2016 03:44 am
White House: Millions of e-mails may be missing
POSTED: 7:07 p.m. EDT, April 13, 2007

http://www.cnn.com/2007/POLITICS/04/13/white.house.email/index.html

• NEW: White House spokeswoman says 5 million official e-mails may be missing
• White House admits it should have kept e-mails on private GOP system
• Chairman of Senate Judiciary Committee doubts e-mails are deleted
• Committee investigating whether U.S. attorneys' firings were politically motivated


WASHINGTON (CNN) -- Millions of White House e-mails may be missing, White House spokeswoman Dana Perino acknowledged Friday.

"I wouldn't rule out that there were a potential 5 million e-mails lost," Perino told reporters.

The administration was already facing sharp questions about whether top presidential advisers including Karl Rove improperly used Republican National Committee e-mail that the White House said later disappeared.

The latest comments were a response to a new report from a liberal watchdog group, Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW), alleging that over a two-year period official White House e-mail traffic for hundreds of days has vanished -- in possible violation of the federal Presidential Records Act. (Watch CREW's comments on the missing messages Video)

"This story is really now a two-part issue," CREW's Melanie Sloan told CNN. "First there's the use of the RNC e-mail server that's inappropriate by White House officials and secondly we've also learned that there were between March of 2003 and October of 2005 apparently over 5 million e-mail that were not preserved and these are e-mail on the regular White House server."

Perino stressed there's no indication the e-mails were intentionally lost, but she was careful not to dispute the outside group's allegations. "I'm not taking issue with their conclusions at this point," Perino said. "We're checking into them. There are 1,700 people in the Executive Office of the President."

White House: 'We screwed up'


Perino's disclosure about the White House e-mail comes a day after she admitted that the White House "screwed up" by not requiring e-mails from Republican Party and campaign accounts to be saved and was also trying to recover those e-mails.

Perino said 22 aides in the political arm of the president's office use party or campaign e-mail accounts, which were issued to separate official business from political work. Some of those accounts were used to discuss the December firings of eight federal prosecutors, a shake-up that has triggered a spreading controversy on Capitol Hill.

Congressional investigators have questioned whether White House aides used e-mail accounts from the Republican Party and President Bush's re-election campaign for official government business to avoid scrutiny of those dealings.

Sen. Patrick Leahy, the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, accused the White House of trying to hide messages on the Republican Party system related to the firing of the U.S. attorneys, which has stirred up a hornet's nest on Capitol Hill.

"You can't erase e-mails, not today," said Leahy, D-Vermont. "They've gone through too many servers. They can't say they've been lost. That's like saying, 'The dog ate my homework.' " (Watch Leahy compare e-mails to Nixon tapes Video)

Leahy said the e-mails would have remained on party or campaign computer servers, and he compared the situation to the famous 18½-minute gap in one of the Watergate tapes.

"They're there," he said. "They know they're there, and we'll subpoena them, if necessary, and we'll have them."

Perino told reporters that the e-mails from those accounts should have been saved, but said policy has not kept pace with technology. She said computer experts were trying to retrieve any records that have been deleted.

"We screwed up, and we're trying to fix it," she told reporters.
E-mails sought by special prosecutor also missing

Patrick Fitzgerald, the special prosecutor in the CIA leak case, disclosed last year that some White House e-mails in 2003 were not saved as standard procedure dictated.

In a January 23, 2006, letter to the defense team of former White House aide I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby, Fitzgerald wrote: "We advise you that we have learned that not all e-mail of the Office of Vice President and the Executive Office of President for certain time periods in 2003 was preserved through the normal archiving process on the White House computer system."

Robert Luskin, personal attorney for Rove, told CNN Friday that he "has no reason to doubt" Fitzgerald's assertion that some White House e-mail was missing.

"You're quite right," Luskin said in a telephone interview. "There was a gap there."

Democrats charge this raises questions about whether the public has gotten the full story on everything from the CIA leak case to the fired U.S. attorneys controversy.

"The biggest problem here is really that here is a White House that is deliberately violating an existing statute that requires them to preserve all records," said Sloan. "And we have significant evidence now both from the RNC e-mail and the White House e-mail that are missing that the White House was using every means possible to avoid complying with the law."

Luskin said it was "foolish speculation" for CREW -- which serves as counsel to former ambassador Joe Wilson and his wife, Valerie Plame, in a private suit against Rove and other Bush officials -- to suggest that the gap in White House e-mail helped Rove avoid indictment in the CIA leak case. Luskin said Fitzgerald told him that Rove was cleared in the case because he "did nothing wrong."

Luskin added that until this month, Rove believed his RNC e-mail was being archived and did nothing wrong.

"Rove has always understood from very early on in the Bush administration that RNC and campaign e-mail were being archived," said Luskin. "He was absolutely unaware until very, very recently that any e-mails were lost. And he never asked that e-mails be deleted or asked for the authority to delete e-mails."

CNN's Ed Henry and Lisa Goddard contributed to this report.
0 Replies
 
bobsal u1553115
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 Sep, 2016 03:48 am
@McGentrix,
Quote:
You don't really think she deleted 33,000 emails about wedding plans do you? I have every email I have ever sent and it's no where near 33,000.


Issa Blamed IBM Software For Loss Of 22 Million Bush Emails

By Jon Perr
http://crooksandliars.com/2014/06/issa-blamed-ibm-software-loss-22-million''''''''''''

The revelation that the Internal Revenue Service lost two years of Lois Lerner's emails has Republicans and their right-wing echo chamber dredging up Watergate comparisons. Peggy Noonan, James Poulos and Paul Mirengoff are just some of the conservatives "paging Rosemary Woods" and gleefully making comparisons to Richard Nixon's 18 minutes of erased tape.

But the GOP's flying monkeys hoping to put the former IRS official at the center of a massive Obama administration plot to target right-wing "social welfare" organizations need not go back in time to 1973 to decry the lost data. After all, in 2008 current House Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chairman Darrell Issa explained how the Bush White House conveniently lost 22 million emails during the Plamegate investigation that led to the conviction of Dick Cheney's chief of staff, Scooter Libby.

As you'll recall, millions of Bush White House emails conveniently went missing between 2003 and 2005, including those in the critical days during which the administration formulated its response to Ambassador Joe Wilson and his covert CIA operative wife, Valerie Plame. In July 2007, Darrell Issa accused Plame of perjury. Then, in February 2008, Issa turned IT expert and brushed off the email imbroglio as merely a software problem. As Mother Jones reported that March:

During a House Oversight Committee hearing last month on the preservation of White House records, an indignant Rep. Darrell Issa (R-Calif.), a frequent critic of Chairman Henry Waxman's investigations, did his best to play down the extent of the Bush administration's now well-documented email archiving problems. Defending the White House's decision to switch from the Lotus Notes-based archiving system used by the Clinton administration, Issa compared the software to "using wooden wagon wheels" and Sony Betamax tapes. To observers of the missing emails controversy, Issa's comments seemed little more than an attempt to deflect blame from the White House for replacing a working system for archiving presidential records with an ad hoc substitute. But to IT professionals who use Lotus at their companies, Issa's remarks seemed controversial, if not downright slanderous. Now, according to an executive at IBM, the software's manufacturer, the California congressman has apologized for his characterization of Lotus and offered to correct the congressional record.

Complicating matters, some 50 Bush White House staffers had used email accounts provided by the Republican National Committee to sidestep federal laws regarding the preservation of digital records. But as CNET reported at the time, Congressman Issa wasn't concerned about potential crimes, but only the cost of investigating them:

"Are we simply going on a fishing expedition at $40,000 to $50,000 a month?" Rep. Darrell Issa (R-Calif.) asked National Archives and White House officials at the hearing. "Do any of you know of a single document, because this committee doesn't, that should've been in the archives but in fact was done at the RNC?"

Thanks to a now-settled lawsuit filed by the National Security Archive and Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington [CREW], Americans learned in 2009 that "the Bush White House, which initially denied that any e-mails had gone missing, announced in January it had located more than 22 million messages that had been mislabeled after a search by computer technicians, according to court records filed by the government on the day after Bush left office."

Alas, that was then and this is now. And now a Democrat is sitting in the Oval Office. And with IRS Commissioner John Koskinen testimony before two House committees regarding what even Democrats like Sandy Levin (D-MI) agree constitute "gross mismanagement" by IRS information technology personnel, Chairman Issa is singing a different tune. With his probe having already cost the IRS a quarter of a million man hours and some $10 million, Issa has done a 180 degree turn from his days pretending to be the Bush administration's IT expert. As he wrote to Koskinen this week:

"I will not tolerate your continued obstruction and game-playing."

McGentrix
 
  -3  
Reply Tue 13 Sep, 2016 11:17 am
3 posts in a row about being non sequitur... You can't defend Hillary anymore, I get it. But please don't wear out my scroll mouse so much. Link and brief synopsis will do just fine.

Hillary antics are ridiculous. Maybe, in a parallel universe, when Hillary is sick as President, she can have Bill stand in for her then too.
0 Replies
 
RABEL222
 
  2  
Reply Tue 13 Sep, 2016 11:19 pm
@bobsal u1553115,
But 22,000,000 conservative e mails werent as important to the conservatives as Clintons 22,000 e mails.
bobsal u1553115
 
  1  
Reply Wed 14 Sep, 2016 06:18 am
@RABEL222,
Quote:
Re: bobsal u1553115 (Post 6266150)
But 22,000,000 conservative e mails werent as important to the conservatives as Clintons 22,000 e mails.


I know ... what the heck was I thinking????? I just like trying to think about the 22,000,000 number. Its so big and yet so inconsequential. Its a mystery.
McGentrix
 
  -2  
Reply Wed 14 Sep, 2016 07:17 am
@bobsal u1553115,
bobsal u1553115 wrote:

Quote:
Re: bobsal u1553115 (Post 6266150)
But 22,000,000 conservative e mails werent as important to the conservatives as Clintons 22,000 e mails.


I know ... what the heck was I thinking????? I just like trying to think about the 22,000,000 number. Its so big and yet so inconsequential. Its a mystery.


So you guys are mad about Bush's emails, and not Hillary's? I don't get it. Are you, *gasp* hypocrites?
RABEL222
 
  2  
Reply Wed 14 Sep, 2016 05:08 pm
@McGentrix,
No, but the fact it dosent bother you shows you are.
0 Replies
 
reasoning logic
 
  -2  
Reply Wed 14 Sep, 2016 05:44 pm
@bobsal u1553115,
If we are going to share opinions what do you think about this?

http://observer.com/2016/09/wikileaks-guccifer-2-0-obama-sold-off-public-offices-to-donors/
0 Replies
 
bobsal u1553115
 
  4  
Reply Wed 14 Sep, 2016 06:08 pm
@McGentrix,
Quote:
Are you, *gasp* hypocrites?


No but you certainly seem to be a big one. You're the one harping on the e-mails claiming they're a good reason not to vote for Hillary Clinton. We're only demonstrating your own hypocrisy to you and all your little teaparty basket of deplorables.

Frankly when I found out about Hillary's use of private servers I was pissed and wanted her arrested. But the fact is she was within the law, which Dick Cheney promulgated as the GOP goosestepped its way over the Bill of Rights with Homeland Security and Patriot Acts. I'm still pissed: about the law which needs to be changed and will not be changed whether tRump or Hillary Clinton wins.

Change the law or go after ALL the people who handled the records and history of the Republic is so causal a way. But stop your idiotic bashing of Hillary only over the way more than TWENTY-TWO MILLION e-mails got treated since Sept 11.
McGentrix
 
  -2  
Reply Wed 14 Sep, 2016 06:28 pm
@bobsal u1553115,
bobsal u1553115 wrote:

Quote:
Are you, *gasp* hypocrites?


No but you certainly seem to be a big one. You're the one harping on the e-mails claiming they're a good reason not to vote for Hillary Clinton. We're only demonstrating your own hypocrisy to you and all your little teaparty basket of deplorables.

Frankly when I found out about Hillary's use of private servers I was pissed and wanted her arrested. But the fact is she was within the law, which Dick Cheney promulgated as the GOP goosestepped its way over the Bill of Rights with Homeland Security and Patriot Acts. I'm still pissed: about the law which needs to be changed and will not be changed whether tRump or Hillary Clinton wins.

Change the law or go after ALL the people who handled the records and history of the Republic is so causal a way. But stop your idiotic bashing of Hillary only over the way more than TWENTY-TWO MILLION e-mails got treated since Sept 11.


Waaaaahhhhhh... Bush did it! Doesn't that ever get old with you guys? I thought Bush was a dumb ass that could barely tie his shoes in the morning and you're saying he maliciously "lost" 22 million emails?



Where are the emails that Hillary had permanently scrubbed from the server and her devices? When will they be found? Oh, right, never.

Also, Is Bush or anyone from Bush administration running for President? No? THEN IT DOESN'T ******* MATTER. Isn't that what Hillary was saying?
bobsal u1553115
 
  2  
Reply Wed 14 Sep, 2016 06:33 pm
@McGentrix,
So the recovery is more important than the hiding of them? Then by your own reasoning Hillary is exonerated of your basket of deplorable lies.

Now drop the hypocritical e-mail crap.
McGentrix
 
  -2  
Reply Wed 14 Sep, 2016 06:36 pm
@bobsal u1553115,
bobsal u1553115 wrote:

So the recovery is more important than the hiding of them? Then by your own reasoning Hillary is exonerated of your basket of deplorable lies.

Now drop the hypocritical e-mail crap.


Not even for a second. You brought this **** up, now you get to wallow in it for awhile. I have no idea how you even begin to think that Hillary would be exonerated of a damn thing. She's a damn liar and you need to admit that fact.
bobsal u1553115
 
  2  
Reply Thu 15 Sep, 2016 08:56 am
@McGentrix,
Who brought it up dip-stick?

YOU DID!!!!

McGentrix
-6
Reply
report
Mon 12 Sep, 2016 09:21 pm
@bobsal u1553115,
bobsal u1553115 wrote:


And NOBODY can demonstrate any sort of quid pro quo with anything Hillary Clinton did.



Maybe you understand quid pro quo differently than I do?

If you pay a lot of money to the Clinton Foundation, you can meet with the Secretary of State and discuss whatever you wish to. Money is the quid, time alone is pro quo.

You don't really think she deleted 33,000 emails about wedding plans do you? I have every email I have ever sent and it's no where near 33,000.
0 Replies
 
reasoning logic
 
  -2  
Reply Sat 17 Sep, 2016 01:42 pm
Some people from Haiti seem to be upset with the Clintons.

 

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