7
   

The Racist Alt-Right Dictionary: 7 Terms You Need to Understand Trump's Most Hateful Support

 
 
Reply Sat 27 Aug, 2016 07:02 am
The Racist Alt-Right Dictionary: 7 Terms You Need to Know to Understand Trump's Most Hateful Supporters

The old white supremacist fringe is rebranding itself with its own special code, and claims Trump as its "glorious leader."

By Adele M. Stan / AlterNet
August 26, 2016

Since Republican presidential nominee Donald J. Trump went public with his embrace of the so-called "alternative right”—which happened when he hired alt-right promoter Stephen K. Bannon as his campaign chief—the self-styled renegade offshoot of cultural conservatism is getting a whole lot of attention.

What’s so renegade about the alt-right? It puts on bold display the racism and misogyny that has always fueled the so-called conservative movement, but which has typically been rationalized through themes involving the word “freedom,” employed to justify a right to discriminate, whether against members of races or creeds other than your own, or by gender, sexual orientation or gender identity. The alt-right hordes on Twitter and other internet haunts dispense with the obfuscation, declaring the superiority of white people and demonstrating contempt for blacks and Jews, hating on women, and preposterously whining that they are the targets of a “white genocide.”


The alt-right encompasses a range of right-wing hate groups and ideologies, from the Neo-Nazi Daily Stormer crowd to the more buttoned-down wanna-be-wonks at the National Policy Institute. As Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton prepared to deliver a speech Thursday devoted to Trump’s exploitation of the alt-right, the movement’s denizens erupted in a stream of vitriol and fevered attempts to define their own movement before Clinton’s definition took hold.

Like all political movements, the alt-right has its own lexicon and memes, as well as its own interpretation of news events. Below you'll find a brief list of terms you may use as a guide if you care to visit the swamps in which adherents to this 21st-century version of white supremacist ideology reside.

1. Alt-right. As Julie Andrews once sang before her character fled the Nazis: “Let’s start at the very beginning.” The term “alt-right” is shorthand for "alternative right." Just as, say, alt folk musicians envisioned themselves as a more modern, hipper iteration of the Dylan-era folk music that preceded them (which really wasn’t folk music at all, but I digress), alt-righties perceive their movement to be the tweaked-for-millennial-consumption adaptation of the ideologies professed by such uncool paleoconservatives as Cranky Uncle Pat Buchanan and Klanboy David Duke.

There are, however, disagreements among alt-righties on the scope of their hatred. The self-parodying Breitbart News editor Milo Yiannopoulos, for example, wears his gay identity as a badge, even as he spews vitriol against Muslims and blacks. Others who wear the alt-right label, such as the Daily Stormer’s Andrew Anglin, spurn Yiannopoulos as a “degenerate.” Yiannopoulos’ latest badge of courage is being banned by Twitter for his racist dogging of actor/comedian Leslie Jones, a star of the all-female reboot of Ghostbusters. (Since then, Jones’ personal accounts have been hacked in a brutal cyberattack.)

One form of hatred that appears to unite alt-righties? Misogyny. Man, do they hate feminists! Yiannopoulos even did a lecture tour titled, “Feminism is cancer.”

Gearing up a Twitter offensive in advance of Hillary Clinton’s speech in Reno about the alt-right, #altright members on Twitter set out to define their own movement.

“#AltRight means you don't think a room full of white males is a problem to be fixed,” wrote @hateful_heritic.

“#AltRightMeans it's time to oppose HUD/Section8 housing moving blacks into the suburbs. Save our White neighborhoods”, [email protected]_AltRight_, with an accompanying photo of a lone white man in a swimming pool, surrounded by dark-skinned people.

Some posted Richard B. Spencer’s white-identity video, “Who are we?” (Money quote: “I’m a Roman, a Briton, a Dane…”)

For giggles, there’s also this parody of Billy Joel’s “We Didn’t Start the Fire,” by American Renaissance, another alt-right racist group.


2. Cuck. Short for “cuckservative,” a derogatory term used to describe self-described conservatives whom alt-righties deem to have rolled over when establishment Republicans demanded they toe the party line, or who have succumbed to the alt-right view of “political correctness,” which basically means the rejection of racist, misogynist or anti-gay epithets. The roots of “cuck” are in the patriarchal word cuckold, a man whose wife has sex with another man. Sometimes in modern usage, it means a man who likes to watch his female partner have sex with another man.

Cuck can be a noun or a verb, replete with schoolboy giggles over its rhyming with f**k. Alt-righties often describe themselves as “uncucked,” which seems a perverse permutation of Shirley Chisholm’s description of herself as “unbought and unbossed.” (Chisholm was the first woman to declare her candidacy for the presidency, and the first black to do so.) In defense of the term, Milo Yiannopoulos (who is British) wrote a post on Breitbart News titled, "'Cuckservative’ Is a Gloriously Effective Insult That Should Not Be Slurred, Demonised, or Ridiculed.”

3. Glorious. To alt-righties, this appears to be the superlative of adjectives, applied to many things other than the term cuckservative, harkening back to the rhetoric of the Third Reich. (In the book Catastrophe and Meaning: The Holocaust and the Twentieth Century, authors Moishe Postone and Eric L. Santner trace the evolution of the term “glory” from the World War I appellation “fields of glory” to its use by Nazis in describing the mass murder of Jews in World War II.)

The Daily Stormer website routinely refers to Trump as “Our Glorious Leader,” as in the post, "Our Glorious Leader Calls for a Ban on All Moslems," and “Glorious Leader Donald Trump Refuses to Denounce Daily Stormer Troll Army,” a reference to the antisemitic trolling of GQ writer Julia Ioffe after she wrote an article on Trump’s wife, Melania. In an interview with CNN’s Wolf Blitzer, Trump declined to renounce the trolling, which included death threats.

Twitter user @_AltRight_ insists that Trump’s #DeportationForce will be “glorious.” In fact, there’s a whole lotta "glorious” ugliness in her Twitter feed.

4. Pepe. Pepe the Frog was once the generic mascot of the anonymous message-board site 4chan, one of the internet hollows where the alt-right first congregated. The alt-right glommed on to it, creating all manner of memes depicting it, even in the uniform of an SS officer and most famously as the face of Donald Trump. Vice’s Roisin Kiebard explains it all.

If you’ve seen this meme, you’ve met the alt-right.

As alt-righties geared up for Clinton’s speech about Trump's alliance with the alt-right, a gif appeared in the #altright feed featuring the image of a white hand feeding Pepe-shaped bullets into the magazine clip of an assault rifle.

Click to enlarge.

5. Rare Pepe. According to the Daily Beast’s indispensable Olivia Nuzzi, the term “rare Pepe” means "an ironic categorization for certain versions of the meme: Pepe, his eyes red and irises swastika-shaped, against a trippy rainbow backdrop." The irony apparently stems from 4chan’s attempts to purge Pepe once the frog became an alt-right racist.

Click to enlarge.

6. Normie. In alt-right-speak, this means anybody who’s not part of the alt-right. Alternatively, it means anyone who’s not part of 4chan/Reddit culture.

7. White genocide. A common theme in alt-right tweets and rants, in which the admission of non-white immigrants to the U.S. or Europe is characterized as the destruction of the white race. Other forms of so-called “white genocide” include racial mixing and the adoption of non-white babies by white people. Such adoptive parents are deemed to be "race traitors."

Adele M. Stan is AlterNet's senior Washington editor. Follow her on Twitter @addiestan.
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Type: Discussion • Score: 7 • Views: 1,170 • Replies: 21

 
McGentrix
 
  -1  
Reply Sat 27 Aug, 2016 07:55 am
I thought it was "neo-cons" or is that passe now? All part of the "vast right wing conspiracy".
revelette2
 
  2  
Reply Sat 27 Aug, 2016 08:14 am
The following is related to your title thread's opening. I am not sure how hiring Banning illustrates a pivot in Trump's campaign. His ex wife says he was violent and a racist against Jews.

New Trump campaign chief faces scrutiny over voter registration, anti-Semitism

The piece is really too long post it in it's entirety, but suffice it to say, for Trump to hire Banning with the red flags waving from the article wasn't too smart if he wanted to change his image to better court women and minorities.
bobsal u1553115
 
  2  
Reply Sat 27 Aug, 2016 09:16 am
@revelette2,
Too many details and facts to edit it much, though .....
revelette2
 
  2  
Reply Sat 27 Aug, 2016 09:27 am
@bobsal u1553115,
The reason why I posted the piece here instead of a Trump thread is because Trump's supporters (a good many of them, not all) are among the people you describe as well as his campaign chief.

Quote:
The New York Daily News reported Friday that Piccard said in a 2007 court statement that Bannon didn’t want their twin daughters attending a school because too many Jews attended. “The biggest problem he had with Archer [School for Girls in Los Angeles] is the number of Jews that attend,” Piccard said in her statement, the newspaper reported. Preate, however, said Bannon has denied saying that and proudly sent the girls to Archer school.

“He said that he doesn’t like the way they raise their kids to be ‘whiny brats’ and that he didn’t want the girls going to school with Jews,” Piccard wrote, according to the Daily News.


From my previous link.
bobsal u1553115
 
  4  
Reply Sat 27 Aug, 2016 09:40 am
Gov. LePage: The enemy is ‘people of color’
http://mainebeacon.com/gov-lepage-the-enemy-is-people-of-color/



In a press conference meant to address a series of racist and violent comments he has made over the last two days, Maine Governor Paul LePage again attempted to justify his remarks about categorizing alleged drug dealers by race, arguing that doing so was an appropriate way to “identify the enemy.”

“The enemy right now, the overwhelming majority of people coming in, are people of color or people of Hispanic origin,” said LePage.

It’s not clear how LePage believes that his anecdotal, race-based scrap-booking is helpful in addressing the underlying issue of opiod trafficking and abuse.

LePage made a series of false statements during the interview, which Press Herald reporter Scott Thistle broadcast live on Facebook, including that his voicemail to Rep. Drew Gattine was meant as a private communication. During his call, LePage said he hoped Gattine would record his obscenity-laced rant and share it publicly.



He's such as straight talker. He speaks his mind. He doesn't have time for politically correct safe spaces or trigger warnings for soft liberals.

But seriously, this has been used as an excuse for discrimination in many military/government type jobs. They don't want people who "look like the enemy".

Why Maine? Why did you elect and re-elect this asshole?
0 Replies
 
bobsal u1553115
 
  2  
Reply Sat 27 Aug, 2016 09:42 am
@revelette2,
The more one knows about the tRump train wreck, the less one wants to see it in the White House.
0 Replies
 
seac
 
  -2  
Reply Sat 27 Aug, 2016 11:55 am
@bobsal u1553115,
Trump is getting support from these unsavory groups because Hillary is their least favored candidate. The presidential campaign has been going on too long for both of the weary candidates, and Trump unfortunately has some stupid stuff coming out of his mouth that leaves him open to a lot of interpretations that can be used against him. Hillary hides stuff very well, that is why I don't trust her period.
revelette2
 
  3  
Reply Sat 27 Aug, 2016 11:57 am
@seac,
I know poor thing, how could Trump be so poorly misunderstood by so very many people? Rolling Eyes
RABEL222
 
  2  
Reply Sat 27 Aug, 2016 02:13 pm
@revelette2,
MY GOD REV!!!!! You havent decided to vote for tRump have you?
revelette2
 
  2  
Reply Sat 27 Aug, 2016 03:06 pm
@RABEL222,
shush, it's a secret.
0 Replies
 
Blickers
 
  6  
Reply Sat 27 Aug, 2016 03:34 pm
@seac,
Quote seac:
Quote:
Trump is getting support from these unsavory groups because Hillary is their least favored candidate. The presidential campaign has been going on too long for both of the weary candidates, and Trump unfortunately has some stupid stuff coming out of his mouth that leaves him open to a lot of interpretations that can be used against him. Hillary hides stuff very well, that is why I don't trust her period.

Seriously? You're still holding out hope that Trump is a non-racist conservative whose political inexperience has allowed him to be with people that he shouldn't be with, but whose heart is still pure?
cicerone imposter
 
  3  
Reply Sat 27 Aug, 2016 04:16 pm
@Blickers,
Yup. Trump is a non-racist who paid for a full page add to execute five blacks who were originally charged with raping a white woman - later to learn they were innocent of the crime. Trump discriminated against blacks from renting his property.
Trump said he didn't want blacks counting his money at his casino, and wanted Jews.
He's not a racist. Take my word for it.
0 Replies
 
seac
 
  -1  
Reply Sat 27 Aug, 2016 05:14 pm
@Blickers,
Racist maybe, Trump will not be a one man island in the White House. Laws are made with scrutiny by Congress and two lower branches of government. There will be no racist laws passing. Trump will and can spew out nasty things, but it doesn't mean they become law.
Blickers
 
  4  
Reply Sat 27 Aug, 2016 07:15 pm
@seac,
Trump's racism is not the worst of his faults. We've had racists in the White House before, and the country survived. Just putting the racism aside, Trump did not dissociate himself from the Ku Klux Klan when they supported him, and he's got nothing but praise for Putin, and even plans to implement Putin's foreign policy for America, which is let American get out of NATO and open the door for Putin to take back Eastern, (then Western), Europe with its military machine. By the way, Putin loves the Klan and the right wing crazies, his propaganda machine supports them. Whatever divides America makes America weak, and that's what Putin likes to see.
0 Replies
 
nimh
 
  7  
Reply Sat 27 Aug, 2016 07:16 pm
@McGentrix,
Totally different groups, though, with no love lost between them. The alt-right (ie white supremacists, rebranded) loathes the neo-cons, and presumably vice versa. If you're hearing a lot about the alt-right now when everything used to be about the neoconservative - well, isn't that only logical at a time when it's no longer GWB, but Donald Trump who leads the GOP?
0 Replies
 
bobsal u1553115
 
  3  
Reply Sun 28 Aug, 2016 06:18 am
6 Media Pillars of the ‘Alt-Right’
Ari FeldmanAugust 27, 2016Radix.com

6 Media Pillars of the ‘Alt-Right’
Ari FeldmanAugust 27, 2016Radix.com

The “alt-right” has taken the media by storm this summer. From the rise — and downfall — of Milo Yiannapoulos to Trump tweeting anti-Semitic graphics to the hiring of Steve Bannon, chairman of Breitbart News, to run the Trump campaign, the neo-white supremacist movement has never been more visible.

The movement and its racist, anti-Semitic, anti-immigrant and homophobic ideologies is supported by a network of online publications. Here is a short primer on this corner of the internet.
1. Breitbart.com

The conservative news site Breitbart has quickly become recognized as the leading publication in the push to take the views of the “alt-right” into the mainstream. Andrew Breitbart, one of the founding editors of the Huffington Post, created the site in 2007. Its latest chairman, Steve Bannon, was just hired to be the manager of the Trump campaign.

Breitbart has deemed the “alt-right” the “hipster right,” and helped tie the American movement to its European ultranationalist counterpart, Generation Identity. Breitbart is also a vehicle for Milo Yiannapoulos, the ultra-conservative commentator, to attack mainstream Republicans, such as Paul Ryan. in his capacity as “technology editor.”

Breitbart made its biggest, most lasting splash when it published “An Establishment Conservative’s Guide to the Alt-Right” in June. The article, written by Milo Yiannapoulos and Allum Bokhari, was an apologia for the intellectual and cultural leaders of the “alt-right.” It praised the human biodiversity phenomenon, calling the pseudoscientific racist movement “group of bloggers and researchers who strode eagerly into the minefield of scientific race differences.”

The Yiannapoulos/Bokhari article also completely sidestepped the question of the movement’s viciously racist and anti-Semitic cartoon culture, writing that, for the cartoonists, it was “simply a means to fluster their grandparents.”
2. American Renaissance

Jared Taylor founded AR in 1990 as part of his New Century Foundation, an early center of pseudoscientific ideas about race. It has been both a print magazine and an online publication. It claims to promote a free flow of ideas about segregation, education and immigration, but “regardless of its calm tone and academic look and feel, the magazine openly peddles white nationalism,” according to the watchdog Southern Poverty Law Center.

AR hosts conferences that bring in many white supremacist speakers, many of whom hide behind euphemistic terms like “racialism,” “white advocacy” and the “alt-right.”

AR is unique among the movement’s publications in that it has demurred on the subject of Jewish inclusion. In a 2006 op-ed, Taylor wrote defended his decision to publish articles by Jewish writers as a way to broaden the movement.

“AR has taken an implicit position on Jews by publishing Jewish authors and inviting Jewish speakers to AR conferences,” he wrote. “It should be clear to anyone that Jews have, from the outset, been welcome and equal participants in our efforts.”
3. Radix Journal

Richard Spencer, the leading voice of the “alt-right,” founded Radix Journal in 2012. It is a publication of the National Policy Institute, the Washington think tank that is the center of the movement’s push into mainstream politics. Spencer is the chairman of NPI, and contributes regularly to Radix.

Biannually in print and in several posts a day online, Radix posts long format, personal essay-style pieces promoting white racial heritage, decrying the tragedy of multiculturalism and attacking mainstream conservatives as “cuckservatives” — a Republican who makes a concession of any kind to the Democrats.
4. Daily Stormer

Billing itself as “The World’s Most Visited Alt-Right Site,” the Daily Stormer is the most openly neo-Nazi media outlet of the “alt-right.” Andrew Anglin, an avowed neo-Nazi, started the site in 2013 after shuttering his year-old site, TotalFascism.com. Total Fascism published long-format articles promoting white supremacy, while Daily Stormer’s articles look a lot like classic Buzzfeed articles in style: lots of GIFs, snarky comments and embedded Tweets and Youtube videos.

The switch was a highly calculated move by a media savvy neo-Nazi, according to Keegan Hankes, a data intelligence analyst at the SPLC.

“It was more effective as propaganda to generate ‘content’ and not long format essays,” said Hankes.
5. VDARE

Named for the first white person born in North America (Virginia Dare), VDARE is a white supremacist website that the SPLC has described as “an anti-immigration hate website.” Both Jared Taylor and Richard Spencer have contributed to VDARE.

Peter Brimelow, a self-described “paleoconservative,” founded VDARE in 1999. Brimelow believes that immigration is to blame for the September 11 attacks.

At the RNC in July, a tweet from VDARE’s Twitter account was shown on the main TV over the stage.

< /br>
6. The Right Stuff

The Right Stuff is an anti-Semitic blog run by Mike Enoch, who has been a speaker at National Policy Institute events. A virulent anti-Semite, Enoch has said that the movement is one based around “ethno-nationalism, meaning that nations should be as ethnically and racially homogeneous as possible.”

The Right Stuff also runs the podcast The Daily Shoah, which created the parentheses, or (((echoes))) meme, in a 2014 podcast. The meme was created because “all Jewish surnames echo throughout history,” an allusion to the age-old conspiracy that Jews run the world through a secret network of power.

After the (((echoes))) meme came to widespread media attention in May the Anti-Defamation League added it to their list of recognized hate symbols.

Jonathan Greenblatt, the CEO of the ADL, has said, “The echo symbol is the online equivalent of tagging a building with anti-Semitic graffiti or taunting someone verbally.”

Contact Ari Feldman at [email protected] or on Twitter @aefeldman.


The “alt-right” has taken the media by storm this summer. From the rise — and downfall — of Milo Yiannapoulos to Trump tweeting anti-Semitic graphics to the hiring of Steve Bannon, chairman of Breitbart News, to run the Trump campaign, the neo-white supremacist movement has never been more visible.

The movement and its racist, anti-Semitic, anti-immigrant and homophobic ideologies is supported by a network of online publications. Here is a short primer on this corner of the internet.

1. Breitbart.com

The conservative news site Breitbart has quickly become recognized as the leading publication in the push to take the views of the “alt-right” into the mainstream. Andrew Breitbart, one of the founding editors of the Huffington Post, created the site in 2007. Its latest chairman, Steve Bannon, was just hired to be the manager of the Trump campaign.

Breitbart has deemed the “alt-right” the “hipster right,” and helped tie the American movement to its European ultranationalist counterpart, Generation Identity. Breitbart is also a vehicle for Milo Yiannapoulos, the ultra-conservative commentator, to attack mainstream Republicans, such as Paul Ryan. in his capacity as “technology editor.”

Breitbart made its biggest, most lasting splash when it published “An Establishment Conservative’s Guide to the Alt-Right” in June. The article, written by Milo Yiannapoulos and Allum Bokhari, was an apologia for the intellectual and cultural leaders of the “alt-right.” It praised the human biodiversity phenomenon, calling the pseudoscientific racist movement “group of bloggers and researchers who strode eagerly into the minefield of scientific race differences.”

The Yiannapoulos/Bokhari article also completely sidestepped the question of the movement’s viciously racist and anti-Semitic cartoon culture, writing that, for the cartoonists, it was “simply a means to fluster their grandparents.”

2. American Renaissance

Jared Taylor founded AR in 1990 as part of his New Century Foundation, an early center of pseudoscientific ideas about race. It has been both a print magazine and an online publication. It claims to promote a free flow of ideas about segregation, education and immigration, but “regardless of its calm tone and academic look and feel, the magazine openly peddles white nationalism,” according to the watchdog Southern Poverty Law Center.

AR hosts conferences that bring in many white supremacist speakers, many of whom hide behind euphemistic terms like “racialism,” “white advocacy” and the “alt-right.”

AR is unique among the movement’s publications in that it has demurred on the subject of Jewish inclusion. In a 2006 op-ed, Taylor wrote defended his decision to publish articles by Jewish writers as a way to broaden the movement.

“AR has taken an implicit position on Jews by publishing Jewish authors and inviting Jewish speakers to AR conferences,” he wrote. “It should be clear to anyone that Jews have, from the outset, been welcome and equal participants in our efforts.”
3. Radix Journal

Richard Spencer, the leading voice of the “alt-right,” founded Radix Journal in 2012. It is a publication of the National Policy Institute, the Washington think tank that is the center of the movement’s push into mainstream politics. Spencer is the chairman of NPI, and contributes regularly to Radix.

Biannually in print and in several posts a day online, Radix posts long format, personal essay-style pieces promoting white racial heritage, decrying the tragedy of multiculturalism and attacking mainstream conservatives as “cuckservatives” — a Republican who makes a concession of any kind to the Democrats.

4. Daily Stormer

Billing itself as “The World’s Most Visited Alt-Right Site,” the Daily Stormer is the most openly neo-Nazi media outlet of the “alt-right.” Andrew Anglin, an avowed neo-Nazi, started the site in 2013 after shuttering his year-old site, TotalFascism.com. Total Fascism published long-format articles promoting white supremacy, while Daily Stormer’s articles look a lot like classic Buzzfeed articles in style: lots of GIFs, snarky comments and embedded Tweets and Youtube videos.

The switch was a highly calculated move by a media savvy neo-Nazi, according to Keegan Hankes, a data intelligence analyst at the SPLC.

“It was more effective as propaganda to generate ‘content’ and not long format essays,” said Hankes.

5. VDARE

Named for the first white person born in North America (Virginia Dare), VDARE is a white supremacist website that the SPLC has described as “an anti-immigration hate website.” Both Jared Taylor and Richard Spencer have contributed to VDARE.

Peter Brimelow, a self-described “paleoconservative,” founded VDARE in 1999. Brimelow believes that immigration is to blame for the September 11 attacks.

At the RNC in July, a tweet from VDARE’s Twitter account was shown on the main TV over the stage.

< /br>

6. The Right Stuff

The Right Stuff is an anti-Semitic blog run by Mike Enoch, who has been a speaker at National Policy Institute events. A virulent anti-Semite, Enoch has said that the movement is one based around “ethno-nationalism, meaning that nations should be as ethnically and racially homogeneous as possible.”

The Right Stuff also runs the podcast The Daily Shoah, which created the parentheses, or (((echoes))) meme, in a 2014 podcast. The meme was created because “all Jewish surnames echo throughout history,” an allusion to the age-old conspiracy that Jews run the world through a secret network of power.

After the (((echoes))) meme came to widespread media attention in May the Anti-Defamation League added it to their list of recognized hate symbols.

Jonathan Greenblatt, the CEO of the ADL, has said, “The echo symbol is the online equivalent of tagging a building with anti-Semitic graffiti or taunting someone verbally.”

Contact Ari Feldman at [email protected] or on Twitter @aefeldman.
0 Replies
 
revelette2
 
  4  
Reply Sun 28 Aug, 2016 08:30 am
@seac,
You are assuming those in the other branches are not wanting to change the direction this country has been on since the sixties. Some of them might be and if there are, who knows what will happen? He could put forward a controversial tell like it is Judge and enough in congress will want him/her in there to get it done.
seac
 
  2  
Reply Sun 28 Aug, 2016 12:44 pm
@revelette2,
I believe that regardless of who becomes President, there are branches of government that can debate any extreme laws that are presented. Our senators and representatives will be listening to their constituents and hopefully make a sound decision. There are powers that can impeach a President if it comes to it. I hope Trump will have a capable VP.

Blickers
 
  3  
Reply Sun 28 Aug, 2016 01:27 pm
@seac,
I seem to remember that doubts about GW Bush were voiced after some of his verbal blunders, and the refrain went, "It's all right, his father was an all right president and will be there to help him, and Bush'll also have a lot of his father's advisors around to help him over the rough spots."

And there were a lot of the elder Bush advisors around, foremost among them Donald Rumsfeld and Dick Cheney. See how well they steered the younger Bush over the rough spots? And the younger Bush was much more capable than Trump of being president-he was governor of a major state.

It's not a good idea to put a guy in there who doesn't know what the hell he's doing from Day One, and then figure his advisors and other branches of government will get him through.
 

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