9
   

Past Tense Question for "To Camera"

 
 
contrex
 
  3  
Reply Fri 26 Aug, 2016 04:21 pm
TheCobbler, I am afraid to say, is a troll. That is, he (I bet it's a male) is someone who, knowing nothing about the topic, still goes ahead and posts what we Brits call 'bollocks' and then, when called on it, cannot bear being contradicted and just posts more and more desperate and silly justifications for the nonsense he has put into the thread. All of his posts on here may be safely disregarded. They are just pure, plain bullshit.

contrex
 
  4  
Reply Fri 26 Aug, 2016 04:22 pm
@TheCobbler,
TheCobbler wrote:
Camera is possessive so it is not camerad (like eyed) but camera'd

This is just nonsense. Quit digging, TheCobbler. You are posting bullshit.
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  4  
Reply Fri 26 Aug, 2016 04:26 pm
@TheCobbler,
TheCobbler wrote:
It looks wrong but I think it is right. Smile

Its looks wrong because it is wrong.

Quote:
It works two ways as a possessive noun and by omitting the e.

You can't make a possessive with 'd - you are just trolling now.
0 Replies
 
ossobucotemp
 
  3  
Reply Fri 26 Aug, 2016 04:36 pm
@contrex,
I'll stand up for The Cobbler. On this post question, I agree with ehBeth. But, no need to call Cobbler a troll. He's been on a2k a long time and is respected. I remember starting out lambasting him about something I don't remember, perhaps about crops in California, but I have often agreed with him over time.

He is on the volatile side and sometimes I think he is off his rocker, but on thinking, get his point. Or not. You and I and others are volatile too.
He and I just finished arguing about something in the last few days.
I value his posts, whether or not I care about uses for the word 'camera'.
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Aug, 2016 07:31 pm
@dalehileman,
http://www.aaaplumbing.com/pipe-scoping.html
TheCobbler
 
  -3  
Reply Fri 26 Aug, 2016 11:16 pm
I appreciate the efforts Osso and Ehbeth!

In this forum you can be voted down for being right or at least offering a good logical answer.

Without dropping the e and replacing it with a hyphen the word becomes unreadable, it is nonsense.

Cameraeeeed is just plain silly.

An average reader would look at cameraed and says, WTF? lol
dalehileman
 
  2  
Reply Sat 27 Aug, 2016 12:00 pm
@cicerone imposter,
Thanks Cis for that link
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  0  
Reply Sun 28 Aug, 2016 03:09 am
If I was to use camera as a verb, for the past tense I'd drop the a and add an e, camered, but that's just me.
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Aug, 2016 03:45 am
Google search shows over 3,500 hits for cameraed. One significant usage is to mean equipped or fitted with a camera or cameras - cyclists, underwater swimmers, etc wear little cameras on their heads and talk of being 'cameraed up'. If you mount CCTV cameras on your house it could be cameraed up also.
TheCobbler
 
  -3  
Reply Sun 28 Aug, 2016 05:13 am
@contrex,
camera'd

Google shows About 429,000 results for "camera'd" in parenthesis

Your point is?

Most of the Google results are for cameraED as in "Camera Education".

And the 2 or 3 references of people actually using the word cameraed have no more knowledge of grammar rules than the next person.

There may not be a consensus yet on how this is really spelled. Once one is decided upon then that will be it, like blogebrity or advertainment,

There is also the word camerades.

Unrelated though here it is.

Etymology[edit]
Before 1571, camarade ("soldiers' dormitory") is feminine. 1587, in military slang camarade either masculine or feminine, with the sense of "who shares with someone else", thereafter "buddy"; 1869 political sense.
From Spanish camarada, itself from cámara ("chamber") rather than Italian camerata which is slightly posterior but which influenced the form camerade which is attested in the XVIth and XVIIth centuries. Both Italian and Spanish correspond to the construction of French chambrée.

com·rade
ˈkämˌrad,ˈkämrəd/
noun
plural noun: comrades
a companion who shares one's activities or is a fellow member of an organization.
synonyms:
companion, friend; More
colleague, associate, partner, coworker, workmate;
informalpal, crony, mate, chum, buddy, dawg;
informalpeeps
"we became comrades back in 1943, working in a field hospital in the Philippines"
a fellow soldier or member of the armed services.
noun: comrade-in-arms
a fellow socialist or communist (often as a form of address).

Comment:
A house can be camera'd too, so can swimmers and cyclists.

There is precedent in grammar that when adding ed to a word with an e at the end the e is always dropped and there is also precedent that adding an apostrophe shows either possession and/or a missing letter.

excerpt from webpage
We usually drop the 'e' at the end of words when adding an ending that begins with a vowel suffix (e.g. -ing, -ed, -er, -able, -ous, ).

write + ing = writing    hope + ed = hoped     excite + able = excitable

Comment:
Grammar drops the e often for readability.

We have now discovered a case where it should be dropped for a also for readability.

The apostrophe indicates two things, the dropped letter and possession.

Would you drop the a for a piece of equipment that is cameraable?

yes... camerable.

The new swimmer's suit is camerable with the attached connector for camera'd exploration.
contrex
 
  3  
Reply Sun 28 Aug, 2016 05:24 am
TheCobbler, you keep being told that apostrophe plus d does not indicate possession. Why can't you get it through your skull? The possessive apostrophe is either preceded or followed by an 's' and no other letter.


TheCobbler
 
  -3  
Reply Sun 28 Aug, 2016 05:25 am
@TheCobbler,
The very purpose of using apostrophes and dropping letters are so we don't have ganged up vowels that make the English language look grotesque and unreadable.

Apostrophes make it clear a word possesses another word or phrase.

To abandon these constructs and you end up with words like cameraable...
TheCobbler
 
  -4  
Reply Sun 28 Aug, 2016 05:27 am
@contrex,
I disagree, okay?

You are wrong.

Get that through your skull...

The person who wrote this thread used the apostrophe in the exact same way I am indicating.
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Aug, 2016 05:27 am
@TheCobbler,
TheCobbler wrote:
Apostrophes make it clear a word possesses another word or phrase.

This is just babble.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Aug, 2016 06:04 am
@TheCobbler,
TheCobbler wrote:

The very purpose of using apostrophes and dropping letters are so we don't have ganged up vowels that make the English language look grotesque and unreadable.


What about liaise?
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  2  
Reply Sun 28 Aug, 2016 06:11 am
I'm getting a right old drubbing with all the thumbs-down; must be a lot of ignorant people on here today. Or maybe just bored. They can't turn wrong into right, however.

0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Aug, 2016 06:17 am
@TheCobbler,
ever hear of a contraction? The use of an apostrophe also includes contraction as opposed to indicating the case of a possessive.
dalehileman
 
  0  
Reply Sun 28 Aug, 2016 11:29 am
@TheCobbler,
Cob I see you've provided a profile, and thanks, it's rare. If no trouble, wonder if you'd (1) tell us what brought you to a2k and (2) no offense but how long did that posting take you to compose
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Aug, 2016 11:33 am
@TheCobbler,
In your case, in this thread, you are being thumbed down for giving bad/wrong information.
TheCobbler
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 29 Aug, 2016 11:50 pm
@ehBeth,
Well someone who writes for a living I disagree ehBeth okay?

If you don't like my answer then don't use it.

Glad you can use your influence to vote down my posts.

And you know what? I don't give a ****.

I stand by my opinion.

camerayed lol!
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

Is this comma splice? Is it proper? - Question by DaveCoop
Is this sentence grammatically correct? - Question by Sydney-Strock
Is the second "playing needed? - Question by tanguatlay
should i put "that" here ? - Question by Chen Ta
Unbeknownst to me - Question by kuben123
alternative way - Question by Nousher Ahmed
Could check my grammar mistakes please? - Question by LonelyGamer
 
Copyright © 2022 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.05 seconds on 10/03/2022 at 12:19:13