0
   

Slain Dallas Cop Might’ve Been A White Supremacist: Still A Hero?

 
 
giujohn
 
  -2  
Reply Sun 24 Jul, 2016 09:11 am
@bobsal u1553115,
bobsal u1553115 wrote:

Independent, my Aunt Fanny's tutu.

Yes Bob independent unlike what you would like to do... Get a bunch of your fanatic rabbid liberal vigilantes on horseback to surround the police department and drag the officer out and string them up from the nearest tree.
I'm always amused when people throw the word justice around meaning that justice is justice only if they agree with the outcome... And it's Injustice if they disagree with the outcome... But then again what comes from the mind of ignorant immature fanatics...
giujohn
 
  -2  
Reply Sun 24 Jul, 2016 09:17 am
@bobsal u1553115,
bobsal u1553115 wrote:

A $850,000 settlement is an admission of culpability.

Gee whiz Bob how many names do you have on this site... Or do you think Walter is too stupid to answer on his own... $850,000 is an admission of culpability? Apparently you know nothing about how a Civil Trial works or a cost-benefit analysis of the situation. You have no clue of the phrase critical thinker... you always seem to lead with immaturity and emotion... The Hallmark of a true fanatic... And So It Goes.
bobsal u1553115
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 Jul, 2016 09:20 am
@giujohn,
All bluster. No substance. What two independent investigations?
0 Replies
 
bobsal u1553115
 
  2  
Reply Sun 24 Jul, 2016 09:21 am
@giujohn,
All bluster. No argument.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  4  
Reply Sun 24 Jul, 2016 09:22 am
@giujohn,
giujohn wrote:
So what's your point Walt?
My point is that "the city settled with the Perez family, paying $850,000 without acknowledging responsibility for his death".

I'd thought that was English.
giujohn
 
  -3  
Reply Sun 24 Jul, 2016 09:24 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:

giujohn wrote:
So what's your point Walt?
My point is that "the city settled with the Perez family, paying $850,000 without acknowledging responsibility for his death".

I'd thought that was English.


It is English Walt it just didn't make a point that's why I was asking what yours was.
Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Sun 24 Jul, 2016 09:41 am
@giujohn,
giujohn wrote:
It is English Walt it just didn't make a point that's why I was asking what yours was.
Well, I'm glad you recognised it as English.
Have a nice Sunday, a good night ... and after you've got this mental recreation -... perhaps you'll understand it, too.
giujohn
 
  -2  
Reply Sun 24 Jul, 2016 10:57 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:

giujohn wrote:
It is English Walt it just didn't make a point that's why I was asking what yours was.
Well, I'm glad you recognised it as English.
Have a nice Sunday, a good night ... and after you've got this mental recreation -... perhaps you'll understand it, too.

And thank you sir for your reply again I recognize it as English but I can make absolutely no sense of it whatsoever... Perhaps you might be able to provide me the key to the code.
bobsal u1553115
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Jul, 2016 06:51 am
8 Reasons Why Police in America Keep Killing Civilians and Getting Away With It
The system protects cops at the expense of civilians.
By Steven Rosenfeld / AlterNet
July 18, 2016

http://www.alternet.org/election-2016/8-reasons-why-police-america-keep-killing-civilians-and-getting-away-it

The question of why police can kill civilians and get away with it isn’t new and isn’t going away. Whether it was a grand jury's decision in late 2014 not to press charges against the cop who killed Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri or a prosecutor's decision a year later on the cops who killed 12-year-old Tamir Rice in Cleveland, or June’s acquittal in Baltimore of the latest officer facing charges for killing Freddie Gray in April 2015, or a video released this week by police in Fresno, Calif., where officers killed a mentally unstable Dylan Noble on June 25, the same questions, legal assessments and lack of accountability seem to recur—even as the victims' circumstances differ.

Noble was unarmed, but kept walking toward officers while hiding one hand even as the cops warned him and threatened to shoot. The police killings this month of Alton Sterling in Baton Rouge, Louisiana and Philando Castile near Minneapolis, Minnesota, followed a similar script, in which the officers involved claimed they felt threatened. In all these cases, a complex and volatile mix of factors involving race, police fear, state-sanctioned power and weaponry, questionable training and unaccountable systems interacted.

In 2014, there were 444 “justifiable” homicides by law enforcement, according to FBI statistics. In 2013, there were 461 justifiable homicides, the FBI said. Academic criminologists say that number is closer to 1,000 annually, because not all local department report to the FBI. Between 2005 and 2015, 47 officers have been charged with murder or manslaughter, and 13 have been convicted of murder or manslaughter from fatal on-duty shootings.

There are many factors surrounding police killings and what’s almost always exoneration under America’s criminal justice system. Some are well-known and others less so, but all point to a police culture and criminal justice system that enables cops to target perceived threats, encourages the use of force and is reluctant to second-guess law enforcement when tragedy ensues.

Here are eight features of that system, compiled from testimonials by defense lawyers, reporters and academics.

1. Too many police departments and uneven training. There are 18,000 police departments across America, from local sheriffs and transit cops to state police and federal officers. Most western nations nationalize their policing, which means more uniform training and dealing with broader constituencies so that, one public defender said, it’s less likely local biases and prejudices can take hold.

2. Cops are overmilitarized and trained to be fearful. Police are more heavily armed today than they were 40 years ago. Departments are dumping grounds for surplus military gear from the Defense Department and also buy it from contractors. Police are often trained by private-sector consultants to adopt a warrior mindset, as was the case with the officer in Minneapolis who killed Castile. They are told to focus on perceived threats and react—and often overreact—by using firearms. The video released this week of two officers killing Dylan Noble showed little attempt on the part of the officers to deescalate and bring in mental health specialists, for example.

3. Cops have too much power, compared to judges. Police are allowed to detain civilians based on their suspicions, which can launch a downward spiral. That’s not the same standard as a judge uses to issue search warrants, where probable cause must be shown. As a practical matter, police can and do order people into the street, to lie down, etc., and if they resist, the system kicks into gear, allowing civilians to be arrested, jailed and charged with resisting arrest, even when it is the officer who lost control of the situation and overreacted.

4. Cops are disciplined and policed by their allies. States typically give the responsibility to investigate police shootings to local county attorneys; it’s a rare exception when the Department of Justice steps in. These state attorneys often have inspectors who are ex-cops, public defenders say. The state attorneys and prosecutors also have pre-existing relationships with local police, because they need them as witnesses in their cases. All of that leads to a bias favoring cops who invariably say they felt threatened and needed to shoot to retain control of the situation.

5. The law puts cops' rights above those of civilians. It’s one thing to say police have too much power and are encouraged to use it. But every state has laws, and the Supreme Court reaffirmed these statutes in a 1985 case allowing police to use deadly force if they have “probable cause to believe that the suspect poses a significant threat of death or serious physical injury to the officer or others.” One result of that standard is that police officers who are involved in shootings, the police unions defending them and their legal teams all predictably declare that the officer was justified in shooting. In other words, the law isn’t on the side of civilians when cops use their weapons.

6. Juries typically give cops the benefit of the doubt. Most jurors have no idea what it’s like to be a police officer or aggressive prosecutor, defense lawyers say. White jurors tend to believe that people have nothing to fear from police if they’ve done nothing wrong. People of color who have been racially profiled by police know that isn’t true, but can fear retribution if they testify in open court against police. As a result, public defenders say, it is very hard to get witnesses—especially other cops—to testify against the police. Part of that is police are trained to protect each other, one factor in what’s called the blue code of silence.

7. Mainstream media and politicians tend to side with police. While this is not always the case, especially in the nearly two years since Michael Brown’s killing in Ferguson and the rise of the Black Lives Matter movement, it’s still a truism that many politicians and the press want to be seen as allies of the police. In the same way prosecutors have to work with cops to obtain convictions, many reporters and politicians work with police as well. The press is always quoting police sources, and politicians like to have their endorsement as they seek office—even in red states where they may be attacking other public employee unions.

8. Police officers almost never pay court costs or fines. Victims of police violence typically end up seeking damages in civil suits because they have lower standards of proof than convicting officers of murder or manslaughter. However, it’s usually police unions that end up covering the court costs, not the officers facing charges, and it is similiarly municipal governments that pay the settlements, academic researchers have found. Those factors work against changing police culture, because police and governmental systems end up insulating the involved officers from financial consequences.

Another Rigged System

It is not a new conclusion to say that policing in America and the criminal justice system are structured to protect cops who use deadly force. Police say they have to be armed because there are so many guns in America. They say the vast majority of police never use their weapons on civilians. But in Europe, in contrast, police don't kill hundreds of civilians year after year, with most getting away with it. Cops are not trained to fear the public and use their firearms when they feel threatened. They're not protected by a police culture and a system of legal precedents that exonerates officers who routinely claim their lives are in danger.

Despite all the public scrutiny and awareness that has come since Brown's death in Ferguson in 2014, police killings in America continue.

Steven Rosenfeld covers national political issues for AlterNet, including America's retirement crisis, democracy and voting rights, and campaigns and elections. He is the author of "Count My Vote: A Citizen's Guide to Voting" (AlterNet Books, 2008).
0 Replies
 
bobsal u1553115
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Jul, 2016 06:54 am
@giujohn,
Quote:
And thank you sir for your reply again I recognize it as English but I can make absolutely no sense of it whatsoever... Perhaps you might be able to provide me the key to the code.


Maybe if you'd had any sort of command for the language yourself and weren't half the rudely xenophobic git you happen to be, you'd understand better.
0 Replies
 
bobsal u1553115
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Jul, 2016 07:01 am

Authorities Investigating Officers Who Made Racist Comments After Brutally Arresting a Black Schoolteacher
Just in case you don't think racism plays a role in police brutality.
By Elizabeth Preza / AlterNet
July 22, 2016

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Photo Credit: Image via screengrab

Officials in Texas are investigating two Austin police officers after video surfaced of a brutal arrest of an African-American elementary school teacher during a traffic stop that culminated in one officer telling her police are wary of black people because of their “violent tendencies.”

The Austin American-Statesman obtained video of the June 2015 incident, which shows a routine traffic stop develop into a violent altercation as Officer Bryan Richter pulls 26-year-old Breaion King from the driver’s seat and throws her onto the ground.
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“Oh my god,” she screams. “Why are you doing this to me?”

According to the Statesman, Richter, 26, charged King with resisting arrest, writing in his incident report she had an “uncooperative attitude” and was “reaching for the front passenger side of the vehicle. The prosecutor dropped the charges after watching the police dash cam video.

King requested to be transported by a different officer, telling police she didn’t trust Richter. Officer Patrick Spraldin drove her to the precinct; subsequent footage obtained by the Statesman captured the officer telling King some officers fear black people “because of their appearance and whatnot.”

“Why are so many people afraid of black people?” the officer asks King, who’s handcuffed in the back seat of the vehicle.

“That’s what I want to figure out because I’m not a bad black person,” King replies.

Spraldin tells King he “can give you a really good idea why it might be that way,” before saying, “violent tendencies.”

King asks Spraldin if he thinks racism still exists, to which he responds, “Let me ask you this. Do you believe it goes both ways?”

“Ninety-nine percent of the time, when you hear about stuff like that, it is the black community that is being violent,” Spraldin says. “That’s why a lot of the white people are afraid, and I don’t blame them. There are some guys I look at, and I know it is my job to deal with them, and I know it might go ugly, but that’s the way it goes.”

“But yeah, some of them, because of their appearance and whatnot, some of them are very intimidating,” he adds.

The Austin Police Department is investigating both officers involved in the incident.

“After reviewing both videos, I and our leadership team were highly disturbed and disappointed in both the way Ms. King was approached and handled and in the mindset that we saw on display in those videos,” Police Chief Art Acevedo told the Statesman.

At a press conference Thursday, Acevedo apologized to King for the officer’s actions. “I’m sorry that in the day you were stopped for going 15 mph, you were treated in a manner that is not consistent with the expectations of this police chief, of most of the officers of this department, and most importantly, of all of us as human beings,” Acevedo said.
0 Replies
 
bobsal u1553115
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Jul, 2016 07:19 am

Police Commander Suspended For Alleged Fabrications About Charles Kinsey Shooting


The officer who shot the unarmed therapist was identified as a SWAT team member.
07/22/2016 07:20 pm 19:20:00
14k

Michael McLaughlin Reporter, The Huffington Post
Napoleon Hilton

A North Miami, Florida, police officer who shot an unarmed black mental health therapist was identified Friday as a SWAT team member, and a police commander accused of fabricating information about the shooting was suspended.

A lawyer for the wounded therapist, Charles Kinsey, meanwhile, told the Miami Herald he does not believe a police union official who claimed the shooting was an accident.

SWAT team member Jonathan Aledda was identified Friday as the cop who fired three shots during the confrontation Monday in which Kinsey was wounded in the leg.

Bystander video shows Kinsey lying in the street with his hands up shortly before the shooting. Kinsey said he had been trying to calm a patient with autism who had run from a nearby group home. The patient’s toy truck apparently was mistaken for a gun by a 911 caller.
X

The cellphone footage adds another vivid flashpoint to recent controversial police shootings of black men in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and Falcon Heights, Minnesota. Police officers, meanwhile, have been gunned down by ambushers in Dallas and Baton Rouge.

Aledda thought Kinsey was at risk from the other man in the street, according to John Rivera, head of the Miami-Dade Police Benevolent Association. The officer tried to shoot the man he thought was attacking Kinsey, but mistakenly shot Kinsey instead, Rivera said.

Kinsey’s lawyer, Hilton Napoleon, on Friday cast doubt on the union leader’s explanation. He said he didn’t believe that a SWAT team member with four years’ experience would be a poor shooter. Napoleon also said the officer should have warned Kinsey to move away if the intended target was the other man.

Kinsey, in an interview from his hospital bed, said he asked Aledda why he shot him after he was hit. He said the officer answered, “I don’t know.”

Aledda is on administrative leave while the authorities review what happened.

Police officials also suspended Commander Emile Hollant without pay for what North Miami City Manager Larry Spring Jr. said were inconsistencies in his statements about the shooting. Officials wouldn’t elaborate.

0 Replies
 
giujohn
 
  0  
Reply Mon 25 Jul, 2016 09:53 am




GOOD NEWS
When A Man’s Wheelchair Got Stuck In A Storm, This Cop Did Something Great
Aug 22, 2014
Ryan Grenoble Editor at The Huffington Post

00:00 / 00:00
NBC-2.com WBBH News for Fort Myers, Cape Coral
When push comes to shove, Gil Benitez is happy to do more pushing.

On Thursday night, the police officer in Fort Myers, Florida, pushed a man stranded in an electric wheelchair all the way home. Benitez had found Michael Arnold stuck in the middle of the street during a fierce rain and lightning storm.

A camera mounted in Benitez’s squad car captured the incident on video, showing the officer step into the pouring rain and approach Arnold to offer his assistance. Shortly thereafter, he wheels Arnold around, then pushes him out of frame as lightning flashes in the background. WFTV reports Benitez helped dry the man off, then waited at home with Arnold until his family arrived.

Arnold’s wheelchair ceased working just as he was crossing the street, leaving him stuck in what ABC-7 describes as “torrential rain” and armed “with only an umbrella, his wheelchair and a cell phone.”

Advertisement


In an interview with NBC-2, Benitez dismissed any labels of heroism, saying he was just doing his job.

He did acknowledge, however, the strength of the storm he stepped into, saying “It was raining so hard, I couldn’t even see the stop sign.
Baldimo
 
  -2  
Reply Mon 25 Jul, 2016 11:12 am
@bobsal u1553115,
None of the above post prove what you say. A build class for making AK's is hardly proof that AK's are as popular in a militia as you keep claiming. Did you know that there are legit gun build classes held all over the country? Most of them are weapon specific ie: 1911 classes, AR-15 classes and yes even AK classes.

I took a look at your link on this post and just to prove your bias on this subject I took a copy of the main "weapons and ammo" page and here is actually what it says:
Quote:
Rifle - Should be semi-auto, but rule number one of a gun fight is: "Have a Gun." Should be of a common caliber e.g.. .223/5.56, 7.62x39, .308win. Military surplus are also perfectly acceptable, but you should bear in mind that ammunition may well become scarce.


No specific mention of the AK other than to mention it's ammo type which is 7.62 x39. I'm pretty sure the graphs you posted are available for a majority of the weapons types that shoot the ammo they mention. In fact if you look to the bottom of the page they have the very same charts for the AR-15 which show how serious they are about the AR platform : http://thelightfootmilitia.com/PersonalPreparedness/StandardsandEquipment/WeaponsandAmmo/AR15ZerosandTrajectories.aspx

bobsal u1553115
 
  2  
Reply Tue 26 Jul, 2016 06:17 am
@Baldimo,
I know how hard is for you to admit that a militia website that instructs on the use, modification of and the ballistic performance of AK-47's means that the militias are fond of and are quite familiar with the AK-47 but thats just the way it is.

Just because you and the half brained commandos in your little group of play soldiers put your nose up against it don't mean jack.
bobsal u1553115
 
  1  
Reply Tue 26 Jul, 2016 06:19 am
@giujohn,
0 Replies
 
bobsal u1553115
 
  1  
Reply Tue 26 Jul, 2016 06:20 am
@giujohn,
0 Replies
 
bobsal u1553115
 
  1  
Reply Tue 26 Jul, 2016 06:21 am
@giujohn,
0 Replies
 
bobsal u1553115
 
  1  
Reply Tue 26 Jul, 2016 06:27 am
0 Replies
 
Baldimo
 
  -1  
Reply Tue 26 Jul, 2016 09:56 am
@bobsal u1553115,
They had the very same modification of and the ballistic performance for AR-15's. What's you point. The pictures you provided as proof hardly had any AK's in them and had a majority of AR-15's.

You just can't admit that you are wrong. You can't admit to knowing nothing about guns and instead use your same old lame copy and paste. No words that are your own, except in an attempt to insult. Those are your only words, insults that rival someone from the 4th grade.

 

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