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where does the rest of the chicken go? A wings question.

 
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Sep, 2004 08:13 pm
They'll stuff pillows with corgi hair.

Speaking of labs, when I was in my lab training at Scripps Clinic in La Jolla, notice if you will the name dropping, a fine luxe town to be poor in, which I was, I used to buy chicken necks at the grocer's. I seem to remember saute'ing them, so help me. I think they were cheaper than chicken wings.
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yawah
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Sep, 2004 10:10 pm
I am not sure if the original question of this post has been answered. Noddy24 replied with an answer, but as far as I can remember all that stuff was there before the chicken wing phenomenon. I don't recall a sudden increase in the available legless and wingless chicken products.

For every 4 legs and/or wings that gets eaten 1 chicken has to be used up. A group of 4 people at the bar can easily order 50 wings. Multiply that out by the number of people eating wings everyday, in every bar, in every city - that is alot of chickens. I cannot see how the supermarket chicken section can account for all those chickens. A interesting things would be to figure out how many chickens per day are used up in a given supermarket and then roughly multiply that by the number of supermarkets (does anybody know these 2 numbers) and try to compare that to an estimate # of chickens needed to supply the wing sales. I would guess that there are alot (alot alot) more chickens used in the 'wing nights' then there are chickens in the supermarkets. Does anybody have any actual numbers to try to figure it out?
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Sep, 2004 10:17 pm
It's not so obvious to me. I almost never see chicken wings available at my local markets now, and if I do, not very many packages, relative to the whole array of chicken bodies and parts taking up part of a whole aisle in their various forms. I suspect your premise is flawed, or floured.
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gustavratzenhofer
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Sep, 2004 11:25 pm
I suppose the obvious progression in this bizarre cycle will be the square featherless chicken. Sort of like a giant crouton.
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Sep, 2004 11:34 pm
I think that's already available, they call them McNuggets..
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gustavratzenhofer
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Sep, 2004 11:40 pm
Good point.
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Sep, 2004 11:49 pm
Hi, Gus.
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RicardoTizon
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Sep, 2004 01:25 am
The chicken is usually quartered. The chicken breast with the chicken wing is the most popular as you have said. The breast is separated from the chicken and is used mostly for soups, nuggets, fillets, etc.

The leg quarter does not sell as much so these are exported to other countries. The Philippines is one of those countries they export to and it floods the local market and sells much cheaper that the local grown chicken. Current retail price of American Chicken leg quarters is 90.00 pesos per kilo or about $1.70

The local chicken is sold at 110.00 pesos per kilo or roughly $2.00

Chicken head, innards, feathers, feet are usually grinded with soil and sold as fertilizer.
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J-B
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Sep, 2004 03:28 am
well well well
I hope it will be not rude to introduce some very local ways to deal with chicken innards(maybe a bit disgusting) of our country

Chicken Purtenance
including hearts, intestines, stomaches....Usually with green chillies
http://woman.online2.sh.cn/UpImages/2003-12/11/131049002911.jpg

Roasted Chicken Ass(GOD!!!! Shocked )
you can only find it in southwest part of china. Can't imagine what it looks like and not images have been found Confused
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hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Sep, 2004 04:15 pm
just received a flyer from 'kentucky fried chicken' in today's bunch of junkmail. they advertise 'boneless chicken wings' as their latest invention . hooray for progress ! hbg
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Sep, 2004 07:09 pm
My mother used to cook with hearts, I think they were chicken hearts, and I remember liking them. She also cooked corned beef tongue with a sugar syrup and raisins.
I liked only the least fatty part of that.. ah, the tip of the tongue(!)

Anthony Bourdain, in his book, Cook's Tour, tours the use of intestines, et cetera, in an informative way. That book also has quite a fair sized section on haggis..
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colorbook
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Sep, 2004 07:17 pm
I can remember my mother cooking beef tongue and I thought it was so good until I found out it was actually a real tongue!
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Eva
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Sep, 2004 07:31 pm
gustavratzenhofer wrote:
I suppose the obvious progression in this bizarre cycle will be the square featherless chicken. Sort of like a giant crouton.


As long as it's all white meat, it's okay with me. Wink
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mac11
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Sep, 2004 07:43 pm
I prefer dark meat. When I go into Boston Market and order "whole chicken, all dark" the newbie kids behind the counter always think I'm pulling their legs...
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hiyall
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Sep, 2004 09:43 pm
Hold your tongue, Osso!!

Do chickens have tongues? Oh I'm sure they do. Can't cluck wifout a tongue. But imagine how many chicken tongues it would take to make a decent samwitch, even if you loaded it up with plenty of mayonnaise.
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Sep, 2004 10:29 pm
Hard to shut osso up, except that she herself does, in amazement. But really, I liked tongue in syrup sauce as child.

I happen to have been catapulted through a lot of sociologic places to where I am now.
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cavfancier
 
  1  
Reply Wed 8 Sep, 2004 03:09 am
Many years ago, my mom went to the local butcher to get some chicken legs. He asked her if she wanted front or back legs, and without thinking she said "Oh, I don't know...." then realized she had indeed had her legs pulled.
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cavfancier
 
  1  
Reply Wed 8 Sep, 2004 03:11 am
A variety of bird tongues were considered delicacies in ancient Rome, including lark and flamingo.
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blueveinedthrobber
 
  1  
Reply Wed 8 Sep, 2004 07:10 am
squinney and I, after doing a balloon job yesterday had lunch at Hooters. Although the wings were good, I really enjoyed the succulent breasts best.
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cavfancier
 
  1  
Reply Wed 8 Sep, 2004 07:37 am
Bi-Polar Bear wrote:
squinney and I, after doing a balloon job yesterday had lunch at Hooters. Although the wings were good, I really enjoyed the succulent breasts best.


Don't you ever stare at the ribs though and wonder, if only I were god...
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