4
   

Putting articles: the or a

 
 
Reply Wed 11 May, 2016 05:01 am
How to say, how will be better: I am fishing in the river or I am fishing in a river? And the same question: I am fishing in the lake or in a lake? Thanks
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Question • Score: 4 • Views: 656 • Replies: 12
No top replies

 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 11 May, 2016 05:07 am
The plausibility of such statements is questionable. Do you propose that you have answered your phone, and that you are telling your caller what you are doing right now? Either the or a can be used in such sentences. The problem is in imagining a situation in which you would make such a statement. Saying the river or the lake implies that your interlocutor will know to which river or lake you refer. Saying a river or a lake begs the question of which river or lake you are referring to. I cannot imagine a situation in which a native speaker of English would make any of those statements.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 11 May, 2016 05:09 am
@helenlight,
helenlight wrote:
How to say, how will be better . . .


How would you say, or how would one say, and, which would be better.
0 Replies
 
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 11 May, 2016 11:25 am
@helenlight,
Helen, "the" implies I know which river and "a," I mightn't
0 Replies
 
Tes yeux noirs
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 11 May, 2016 11:50 am
If my father spoke of dismissing someone contemptuously, he would say "I'll tell him to go and jump in the lake", and if someone had tried to trick or betray him he'd say "he tried to sell me down the river". The identities of these watery milieux were, I suppose, previously known, or else obvious to the listener (me), as "the lake into which fools should jump", and "The river down which tricksters try to sell us". Not connected, I know, but to my father (and now me, I realise) "up the Swanee" was a very bad place to end up.

0 Replies
 
InfraBlue
 
  2  
Reply Wed 11 May, 2016 12:38 pm
@helenlight,
"I am fishing in the river/the lake" implies a specific river or lake.

"I am fishing in a river/a lake" does not imply a specific river or lake.
dalehileman
 
  2  
Reply Wed 11 May, 2016 01:53 pm
@InfraBlue,
Infra isn't that pretty much what I said in #.....816 above
Tes yeux noirs
 
  1  
Reply Wed 11 May, 2016 03:06 pm
@dalehileman,
Quote:
Infra isn't that pretty much what I said in #.....816 above

Yes.
dalehileman
 
  0  
Reply Wed 11 May, 2016 04:04 pm
@Tes yeux noirs,
Thank you again Tes, what would we do....
helenlight
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 May, 2016 09:10 am
@dalehileman,
Thanks everybody for help!
helenlight
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 May, 2016 09:11 am
Thanks everybody for help:-)
0 Replies
 
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 May, 2016 12:38 pm
@helenlight,
Quote:
Thanks everybody
Entirely welcome, Helen
0 Replies
 
selectmytutor
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 May, 2016 03:53 am
@helenlight,
I am fishing in the river and I am fishing in the lake.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

deal - Question by WBYeats
Drs. = female doctor? - Question by oristarA
Let pupils abandon spelling rules, says academic - Discussion by Robert Gentel
Please, I need help. - Question by imsak
Is this sentence grammatically correct? - Question by Sydney-Strock
"come from" - Question by mcook
 
  1. Forums
  2. » Putting articles: the or a
Copyright © 2019 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 10/20/2019 at 10:21:50