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Is it possible to change "if-clauses" into participles?

 
 
unison
 
Reply Wed 11 May, 2016 01:40 am
Some English grammar books in Korea tell us that we can change “if-clauses” into participles, but when I have checked everywhere on google about participles, they don't show any examples though only a few say that participles sometimes indicate conditions, so let me ask you Native English Grammarians. Are the participles in the following grammatically correct?

1. If you work hard, you will succeed.
=Work hard, and you will succeed.(0)
=Working hard, you will succeed.-Is this grammatically correct?

2. If it is fine tomorrow, I will go on a picnic.
=It being fine tomorrow, I will go on a picnic.-Is this grammatically correct?

3. If I meet her in person, I will be happy.
=Meeting her in person, I will be happy?- Is this grammatically correct?

4. If I were a bird, I could fly to you.
=Being a bird, I could fly to you.-Is this grammatically correct?

5. If he had been born in better times, he would have become a poet.
Had he been born in better times, he would have become a poet.(0)
Having been born in better times, he would have become a poet.-Is this correct?
Born in better times, he would have become a poet.-Is this grammatically correct?-Is this correct?

or could you recommend any website through which I could study conditinal participles?
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 11 May, 2016 01:53 am
All of those examples are grammatically correct. Some of them sound awkward in contemporary English usage, but they are nonetheless correct. Clauses which express an idea which is not factually accurate, that are expressive of a doubt, a wish, regret, request, demand, a proposal or an imperative also establish a condition. "Were it my decision . . ." in a situation in which it clearly is not my decision, is not factually accurate. "It is not certain that . . . "; "One hopes to see . . . "; "It is is, sadly, the case that . . ."; "The committee would appreciate . . ."; "We insist that . . ."--etc., are all examples of clauses which establish a condition without employing "if."
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 11 May, 2016 02:01 am
@Setanta,
It occurs to me that i have not in fact answered your question, although i do confirm that your examples are not grammatically incorrect. When your idea is one which express an idea which is not factually accurate, that is an expressive of a doubt, a wish, regret, request, demand, a proposal or an imperative--you may employ a participle clause. I suggest that you do a web search for the criterion: "participle clauses."
unison
 
  1  
Reply Wed 11 May, 2016 09:42 am
@Setanta,
thank you soooooooo much for your kind reply. I have tried my best to find any website for conditional participles, but in vain. No website suggest any examples for that. would you recommend any website for conditional participles if you have any? thank you in advance.
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