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Noun question...

 
 
Seizan
 
Reply Tue 26 Apr, 2016 11:06 pm
Many years ago, I saw a cartoon drawing of a businessman in his office, standing and looking quite irate. A departing visitor was just going out the door. There was another person in the office (I assume it was an employee or maybe a butler). The caption for the businessman: He was saying angrily, "How DARE he call me a .....! Edwards -- go look that up and tell me what it means!"

Of course, the joke was that the action of ordering someone else to "go look that up" apparently proved the correct application of the word to that businessman.

But I can't for the life of me remember what that word was, other than it was a single-word term and I have never heard it or read it since...

Any helpers here?

Seizan
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Type: Question • Score: 2 • Views: 452 • Replies: 8
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Tes yeux noirs
 
  1  
Reply Wed 27 Apr, 2016 12:39 pm
"Ignoramus" is a likely candidate.
Seizan
 
  1  
Reply Wed 27 Apr, 2016 05:33 pm
@Tes yeux noirs,
Thanks, but it's wasn't "ignoramus", which I have encountered after. I believe the definition of the word might have been "one who does nothing for himself but has others do for him". A single word of perhaps 4 or 5 syllables; an unusual word.
0 Replies
 
Miss L Toad
 
  1  
Reply Wed 27 Apr, 2016 11:15 pm
@Seizan,
seizan r u wanting an anagram

http://www.dictionary.com/browse/suzerain
Seizan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Apr, 2016 12:24 am
@Miss L Toad,
No, it was a real English word, just a rather uncommon one...
Miss L Toad
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Apr, 2016 01:16 am
@Seizan,
Try the link.

http://www.thesaurus.com/browse/suzerain?s=t
Seizan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Apr, 2016 02:53 am
@Miss L Toad,
Thanks again, but those are all commonly-used nouns. This was an unusual nomenclature sort of word. Like"kleptomaniac" describes one who steals and secretes objects on his person surreptitiously. Maybe a word based in Latin or Greek. Something perhaps a social psychologist might use to describe that sort of person.
0 Replies
 
mark noble
 
  1  
Reply Sun 1 May, 2016 06:40 am
@Seizan,
Bigot
Seizan
 
  1  
Reply Sun 1 May, 2016 05:32 pm
@mark noble,
Thanks again, but that's a common word. The word I'm looking for ended with "-ist" and was 3 or 4, maybe 5 syllables long. Latin or Greek derived, maybe a term used by psychologists to describe such a person...?
0 Replies
 
 

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