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Has anyone in North America or Europe traced their ancestry?

 
 
Reply Thu 3 Mar, 2016 01:46 pm
We are all descendants from Africa. That's been proven by DNA. Although I'm third generation Japanese American, I often wonder where by primary roots are. All I know is that my great-grand fathers were of samurai class. Beyond that, there is no record of ancestry. Japan didn't keep records beyond that as far as I know. it would be interesting to trace my ancestry back many generations.
The Family History library at Brigham Young University was helpful but limited.
I wonder where else we can find more information at reasonable cost.
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 3 Mar, 2016 02:03 pm
@cicerone imposter,
I wasn't all that interested in my genealogy. I've known what my parents told me, and what other family members had to say pro or con. A friend who is into genealogy offed to look at records for me, and worked up a big packet of stuff - which didn't quite match what I remember my father saying (he being the more data inclined of my parents). I did learn a bunch of new stuff that I'm sure of now because of her searches, and she/her research is likely right vs. the family story.

Another family member did - now many years ago - some research via a Mormon site. I take that with a grain of salt too. My friend found more..

Anyway, my friend researched various genealogy websites. I should mention that she's one of the smarter people I've ever known, and well practiced in doing genealogy searches.

This is now also something like ten or fifteen years ago, and there may be better sites out there now - so, check out some sites yourself first.
There are probably websites out there just on how to do genealogy research.

I would look around a bit before using some firm or website in an ad..

There ya' go, good hobby for you, Tak!
0 Replies
 
Foofie
 
  0  
Reply Thu 3 Mar, 2016 03:45 pm
@cicerone imposter,
cicerone imposter wrote:

We are all descendants from Africa.


That's the Homosapien part of the genome. Then there's the Neanderthal part, and in Asians supposedly a cousin of Neanderthal called Denizovan (or something close to that).

Anyway, geneology that traces specific ancestors I find no interest in, since they would not have been part of the mainstream population likely; nothing to write home about. However, I would be curious what a DNA test would show. There too I think there is a good bet on my Y chromosome, and my X chromosome could have come from anywhere, under possibly odd circumstances after the Black Death passed through and left people with children to raise by themselves.

I am more interested in future generations of DNA, based on what segment of a gene pool descendants will come from. A possible reason to go to college.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 3 Mar, 2016 04:08 pm
My mother's ancestor landed in New Jersey in 1676, one of two brothers. In 1899, the last descendant of the brother who had remained in Ireland died, and the only direct descendants of the two brothers were in the United States. So a genealogy of the descendants of the two brothers was compiled, as the cousin in Ireland had left a considerable estate. My maternal grandfather brought the record up to 1955. I don't know who eventually inherited, other than that it was not anyone we knew. However, as all the American members of the family are descendant of the brother who landed in New Jersey, the lucky family were cousins.

CI, if you're the third generation born in the United States, you are sansei. (EDIT: Oops, that would be yonsei.)
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Thu 3 Mar, 2016 04:11 pm
@Setanta,
Sansei is right: "san" means three. "ichi" = 1, "ni" = 2, and "san" = 3.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 3 Mar, 2016 04:47 pm
@cicerone imposter,
I said if you were the third generation born in United States--your ancestorswho came here would be issei, their children nisei and your parents sansei.
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Thu 3 Mar, 2016 04:52 pm
@Setanta,
No argument.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Thu 3 Mar, 2016 05:05 pm
I have not personally done that, but I found a genealogy chart on Ancestry.com, or whatever it is, some years ago. It gave a good rundown of my father's family and ancestry, but only back into Georgia, which was a revelation; I had not been in contact with these people since the age of three. My presence around there was noted by a first cousin and we came into contact for the very first time. He doesn't like the liberal person I grew up to be, so, we actually only stay in touch sporadically.
Ragman
 
  3  
Reply Fri 4 Mar, 2016 09:28 am
@edgarblythe,
Cripes, as it is...I don't want to know the relatives with whom I'm acquainted ... much less the ones who are long gone.

Also, by the time that I reached puberty my parents moved, changed their last names and had plastic surgery done to their faces so that I'd never be able to trace them.
Lordyaswas
 
  2  
Reply Fri 4 Mar, 2016 10:00 am
I'm guessing that one or two of you might have a British name.

Here is an interesting article with an interactive chart to see where your surname is most common in Britain today. It's normally a good indicator where your family originates from, as us Brits don't tend to travel too much around our own country, on the whole.

I tried mine (my ancestry search took me back to Anglesey/North Wales to about 1720).

I entered my surname and got exactly the same 'hit' on the map. That's where most of my tribe still live, seemingly.


I think the data is collated from credit and bank card transactions around the country.


See how it works for you here........

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3470807/Where-surname-Website-claims-guess-family-originates-reveals-common-is.html
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Fri 4 Mar, 2016 10:33 am
@Ragman,
But I had to know what became of my father and grandparents. Turns out my father was murdered for his car, in 1948. I would never have known, but for people such as my cousin.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 4 Mar, 2016 10:35 am
@Lordyaswas,
One of my grandparents had the surname, Routh. My sister traced her people way back in England.
saab
 
  1  
Reply Fri 4 Mar, 2016 10:46 am
Someone has traced the ancestry on my father´s side back to around 1600 - also my husbond´s family can be traced.
Much further back is impossible as there were no records as a rule.
I am not so interested in everybody who is related to me somehow.
Over the years I have been given letters, pictures, death certificates and all kind of small things.
This has given me a rather clear picture of my ancestors and their lives.
I have collected all of it. Written down a lot and added things. Now I havee several binders with all of it in cronological order.
Like when a child was born I have added who else was born or who died or what book was just published. I tried to put their lives into contexts with history.
It is fun to see that one person is in the discussion group as Kierkegaard´s brother and another one does not like him and a third one is all for Grundtwig.
Three generations and three opinions. I would have loved to listen to their family disputes.
From letters I have noticed that my ancestors seem to have been very openminded people for their time.
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Fri 4 Mar, 2016 10:57 am
@edgarblythe,
edgarblythe wrote:

One of my grandparents had the surname, Routh. My sister traced her people way back in England.



Routh is a village just north of Hull. Typing Routh into the interactive map shows the hotspot for the present day Routh clan is still roughly in that area, maybe thirty miles to the West.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Routh,_East_Riding_of_Yorkshire


And Routh is in the Domesday Book......

http://opendomesday.org/place/TA0942/routh/
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  4  
Reply Fri 4 Mar, 2016 10:59 am
@saab,
I didn't have to trace back my paternal ancestry, since someone already did at the beginning of the last century. (Obviously related to the mill and corn trade they owned then, because the history of that was written in the same handwriting as well.)

So while most others can go back to about 1600, I have the first written evidence of an ancestor from 1287. (He testified a document)
This and a few others only due to the fact that these documents were archived in the archives of a monastery (and nowadays in the state archive).

ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Fri 4 Mar, 2016 11:02 am
@Lordyaswas,
Interesting site. I don't have a British surname, but a sort of made up name by way of Roma great-grandparents. Turns out there are patches for that same name on that map generator - which correspond with stories we didn't know if we should believe.
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Fri 4 Mar, 2016 11:05 am
@ehBeth,
Really?

How interesting!
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Fri 4 Mar, 2016 11:18 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter, You should also share the story behind the street named after your name.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Fri 4 Mar, 2016 11:26 am
@Lordyaswas,
Quote:
Professor Paul Longley, who is behind the study said interestingly most people don’t move far from their ancestral homes.

‘Most Anglo Saxon family names came into common usage between the 12th and 14th centuries, and were first coined in particular parts of the country,’ he said.

‘What is interesting is that most individuals do not move far from their ancestral family homes and so, 700 or more years later, most names can still be associated with particular localities.’
Hinteler is a Saxon name, created a few decades earlier.
It means "the [fenced] place where the hind comes out". So my first known ancestor, Dithmar von Hinthlere, lived in a place called Henthlere - or Hinthlere, depending how you read the document

I live just 25 kilometres away from it Very Happy
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Fri 4 Mar, 2016 11:27 am
@Lordyaswas,
clicking through took me to the world version

I ran it , using an earlier spelling of the name. The Brit location stayed the same - and the European areas make sense (and add oomph to a somewhat disputed detail).

This will be interesting to tell hamburgboy about on the weekend.

 

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