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Whats for "supper"?

 
 
Reply Fri 6 Aug, 2004 06:25 pm
Does "supper" mean lunch, or dinner?

Where I grew up "coke" meant any kind of soft drink - where I live now they say "soda". (So, obviously, I'm from the south so I should know what "supper" means, but I don't, because I'm from the city and they don't say "supper".)

What other words are used regionally?

What other words change meaning, regionally?
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fortune
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Aug, 2004 06:34 pm
Well, no one I know actually uses the word "supper" but I have always taken it to mean dinner. Speaking of which, when I say dinner I mean the evening meal but some people I know use it to denote the midday meal (ie lunch). Also, some (usually those who say "dinner" for "lunch") say "tea" when refering to what I call dinner. I use it to mean either the beverage or a "tea" (ie high tea) which is an affair involving scones with butter and jam and cups of tea (the drink).

Whew, I think I'll go have a cup now...
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Aug, 2004 06:38 pm
meatloaf sammiches . . . i was a very, very good boy . . .















(Edit: which is to say, i don't care what one calls the meal, as long as one does not call me late . . . )
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boomerang
 
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Reply Fri 6 Aug, 2004 06:45 pm
So maybe the real controversy is over "dinner" - whether it means luch or supper....

Or....???

Fortune! You have me totally confused...

I think I'll go have a cuppa something and a meatloaf sandwitch!
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boomerang
 
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Reply Fri 6 Aug, 2004 06:51 pm
My sister, who lives in Texas, told me about a new hire in her office who came to her wanting to know what it meant when people left voice mail messages saying they'd be "out of pocket" till whenever.

The woman had never heard the expression before and didn't know if it meant that someone just didn't want to be disturbed, or gone, or unreachable, or something else entirely!
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dlowan
 
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Reply Fri 6 Aug, 2004 07:01 pm
Lol - well, in Australia, supper is not generally used - but if it were, it would mean a snack late in the evening, after dinner, which is the evening meal, also known as tea!
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dlowan
 
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Reply Fri 6 Aug, 2004 07:02 pm
Out of pocket here means broke - or, with "out-of-pocket expenses" would most often mean money you paid for work related activities from your own pocket.

Out at pocket would mean shabby, or down at heel.

Whew.
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gustavratzenhofer
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Aug, 2004 07:13 pm
I think supper is more of a catholic term.

I grew up in a Catholic community and the three meals, in order, were breakfast, lunch, and supper.

Some of the more daring occupants of the small town would refer to lunch as dinner, but they were generally ignored.
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boomerang
 
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Reply Fri 6 Aug, 2004 07:28 pm
From what I hear, you swamp Catholics are just lucky to get a critter for eatin', no matter the meal, gustav. That, of course, is opposed to the high desert Catholics who are more rescourceful, and, some would say, downright hefty.

"Out of pocket" means that too, here dlowan but in Texas it also means unreachable - so, if you'll be in a meeting or out with a client you'll be "out of pocket".
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kaleidosmith
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Aug, 2004 09:02 pm
"Supper's Ready"

- Genesis


http://www.lyricsdepot.com/genesis/suppers-ready.html
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stuh505
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Aug, 2004 09:55 pm
from where i come from supper and dinner are synonymous and there is no ambiguity between lunch and dinner
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boomerang
 
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Reply Fri 6 Aug, 2004 10:00 pm
So its lunch, and then super/dinner?

Thats an angle I hadn't thought of....
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Montana
 
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Reply Fri 6 Aug, 2004 10:09 pm
Supper always meant dinner in my house.

We also say Pop = soda where I live. If I ask for a soda here, I get the "what is that".
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boomerang
 
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Reply Fri 6 Aug, 2004 10:13 pm
I get the same thing with "coke" .

"No, I'll have a 7-up" or something.

I haven't heard "Pop" in a long time!
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Montana
 
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Reply Fri 6 Aug, 2004 11:00 pm
When we moved to Canada 4 years ago, it took me awhile to get use to asking for a pop. My son and I recently took a trip back to Mass and being so used to saying pop now, I asked for a pop in a restaurant and I got the "what's that?", lol :-D
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fortune
 
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Reply Sat 7 Aug, 2004 10:44 am
Here soda (or pop) is called soft-drink. I 'spose that is to be expected of Australia though, considering that the alternative is a hard drink (ie. alcohol Laughing )
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