hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Wed 14 Oct, 2015 02:15 am
@hawkeye10,
Quote:
It was, without question, the climax of the debate. Hillary Clinton was defending herself against email allegations, when Bernie Sanders came to her rescue. In doing so, he not only demonstrated the decency that is the hallmark of his campaign, but also proved that he's no ordinary politician.

Bernie Sanders doesn't want to win the White House if it means losing his integrity. He's willing to protect even his political rival if it's in the name of justice.

This campaign cannot be about emails, but only Bernie Sanders was big enough to say that, on his competitor's behalf.

Bernie Sanders: "What the Secretary said is right. And that is the American people are tired of hearing about your damn emails."


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/brian-hanley/bernie-sanders-won-the-de_1_b_8290498.html?ncid=txtlnkusaolp00000592

Dont speak for me asshole, and women are equals now, they can speak for themselves, if they need a man to defend them then they have some issue that they need to address. In Hillary's case it is the fact that she did a bad thing.
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Wed 14 Oct, 2015 04:33 am
@hawkeye10,
The Elite are running a iron wall that Hillary won.

Let's see what the little people say. The results will be available in about a week. It did not feel that way to me, though I freely admit to being a Hillary hater.
hingehead
 
  2  
Reply Wed 14 Oct, 2015 06:52 am
@hawkeye10,
You know I'm still gobsmacked by how often you say 'elite'? And floored that you rail against it while having 'vote trump' as your sig.

Lewis Carroll writing your stuff?
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Wed 14 Oct, 2015 07:02 am
@hingehead,
I dont know who that is. I am still gobsmacked that every single snap poll I looked at said Sanders won, and every single main stream media outlet is claiming that Hillary won, the D party leaders are thrilled, and that Biden is not needed.

And I sure did not think Hillary won, I have her coming in third.
hingehead
 
  3  
Reply Wed 14 Oct, 2015 04:32 pm
@hawkeye10,
Sorry, it was an elitist reference:

Quote:
Lewis Carroll > Quotes > Quotable Quote

“When I use a word,’ Humpty Dumpty said in rather a scornful tone, ‘it means just what I choose it to mean — neither more nor less.’

’The question is,’ said Alice, ‘whether you can make words mean so many different things.’
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Wed 14 Oct, 2015 06:27 pm
@hingehead,
Too many people besides me are talking about the power and dishonesty of the elite for you to succeed in passing the argument off as fiction. Clearly we are watching you deploy a defense mechanism.
roger
 
  3  
Reply Wed 14 Oct, 2015 07:18 pm
@hawkeye10,
It's more like we question the composition of the elite. Trump is, in spite of his big, vulgar mouth.
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Wed 14 Oct, 2015 07:47 pm
@roger,
roger wrote:

It's more like we question the composition of the elite. Trump is, in spite of his big, vulgar mouth.

Is the concept of defecting unknown around these parts?
hingehead
 
  2  
Reply Wed 14 Oct, 2015 08:45 pm
@hawkeye10,
Right. Trump is there for the little guy. He's the PT Barnum of our age, and you my acquaintance, are one of his 'resources' born every minute.
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Wed 14 Oct, 2015 09:03 pm
@hingehead,
hingehead wrote:

Right. Trump is there for the little guy. He's the PT Barnum of our age

A nice compliment, though I doubt that you are educated enough to know that before I pointed it out

Quote:
Politician and reformer[edit]
Barnum was significantly involved in politics, focusing on race, slavery, and sectionalism in the period leading up to the American Civil War. He had some of his first success as an impresario through his slave Joice Heth. Around 1850, he was involved in a hoax about a weed that would turn black people white.

Barnum was a producer and promoter of blackface minstrelsy. Barnum's minstrel shows often used double-edged humor. While replete with black stereotypes, Barnum's shows satirized as in a stump speech in which a black phrenologist (like all minstrel performers, a white man in blackface) made a dialect speech parodying lectures given at the time to "prove" the superiority of the white race: "You see den, dat clebber man and dam rascal means de same in Dutch, when dey boph white; but when one white and de udder's black, dat's a grey hoss ob anoder color."[26]

Promotion of minstrel shows led to his sponsorship in 1853 of H.J. Conway's politically watered-down stage version of Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin; the play, at Barnum's American Museum, gave the story a happy ending, with Tom and other slaves freed. The success led to a play based on Stowe's Dred: A Tale of the Great Dismal Swamp. His opposition to the Kansas-Nebraska Act which supported slavery, of 1854 led him to leave the Democratic Party to become a member of the new anti slavery Republican Party. He had evolved from a man of common stereotypes of the 1840s to a leader for emancipation by the Civil War.

1879 Connecticut anti-contraception law[edit]
While he claimed "politics were always distasteful to me," Barnum was elected to the Connecticut legislature in 1865 as Republican representative for Fairfield and served four terms.[6][27] In the debate over slavery and African-American suffrage with the ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, Barnum spoke before the legislature and said, "A human soul, ‘that God has created and Christ died for,’ is not to be trifled with. It may tenant the body of a Chinaman, a Turk, an Arab or a Hottentot – it is still an immortal spirit."[6] Barnum was notably the legislative sponsor of a law enacted by the Connecticut General Assembly in 1879 that prohibited the use of “any drug, medicinal article or instrument for the purpose of preventing conception" that remained in effect in Connecticut until being overturned in 1965 by the U.S. Supreme Court Griswold v. Connecticut decision.[28]

Barnum ran for the United States Congress in 1867 and lost. In 1875, Barnum as mayor of Bridgeport, Connecticut, worked to improve the water supply, bring gas lighting to streets, and enforce liquor and prostitution laws. Barnum was instrumental in starting Bridgeport Hospital, founded in 1878, and was its first president.[7]

Profitable philanthropy[edit]
Barnum enjoyed what he publicly dubbed "profitable philanthropy." In Barnum's own words: "I have no desire to be considered much of a philanthropist...if by improving and beautifying our city Bridgeport, Connecticut, and adding to the pleasure and prosperity of my neighbors, I can do so at a profit, the incentive to 'good works' will be twice as strong as if it were otherwise."[29] In line with this philosophy was Barnum's pursuit of major American museums and spectacles. Less known are Barnum's significant contributions to Tufts University. Barnum was appointed to the Board of Trustees prior to the University's founding and made several significant contributions to the fledgling institution. The most noteworthy example of this was his gift in 1883 of $50,000 ($2,000,000 in 2013), to establish a museum and hall for the Department of Natural History, which today houses the department of biology.[30] Because of the relationship between Barnum and Tufts, Jumbo the elephant became the school's mascot, and Tufts students are known as "Jumbos."[3

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/P._T._Barnum

Anyone who devotes themselves to the health of the collective is a friend in my books.
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Thu 15 Oct, 2015 01:59 am
@hawkeye10,
It is amazing to me that we have already forgotten that the counter culture of the 60's was powered primarily from defections from the elite, mostly young members of powerful families who looked around at where America was going, and where their futures were going, and decided that they objected.

Anyways, a defining of the elite would be a good project, as well as how it has gone bad for America. Here is a start:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/10/22/AR2010102202873_2.html?sid=ST2010102204725

The elite dont just own assets, they also control the levers of political power and now also the channels of communication in this society. They both own in the Marxist sense but they are also the intelligentsia, and in a society that has long tended to defer to the alleged experts the elite have been able to take huge portions of not only the assets of the collective but also have taken to the task of attempting to mold the opinions of the little people in such a way that they protect their power. This project has now failed. Anyone who looks like, smells like, acts like a member of the elite is now suspect.

It may be that just as we need to break up the big corporations we also need to break up the Ivy's. I saw an argument just last week that it is time to tax them, which could very well be a good start.

Quote:
Jim Webb is a patriot, a warrior, and a scholar. While I disagree with him on a number of policy points, he may well have the most impressive biography of any candidate still in the race. Yet spectacles like his fellow Democrats’ enemies lists are exactly what we get when the bulk of our aristocratic class (I’m going to stop using the term “elite” until that status is earned) is largely divorced from the harsh realities of the world. They don’t understand what an enemy is because — thanks to the sacrifices of men like Jim Webb — they haven’t felt the fear and horror of up-close encounters with true evil

Read more at: http://www.nationalreview.com/corner/425565/lesson-our-political-aristocrats-jim-webb-puts-enemies-perspective-david-french


Interesting idea but I am sticking to the term elite for now. It does better at conveying the sense of " them who think they are better than others".
hingehead
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 Oct, 2015 07:47 am
@hawkeye10,
Quote:
It does better at conveying the sense of " them who think they are better than others"


I'd accuse you of self-loathing, but I know how humble you are.
0 Replies
 
engineer
 
  1  
Reply Mon 26 Oct, 2015 12:16 pm
Fivethirtyeight.com compiled all the post debate polls and Clinton was the big winner.

Quote:
Clinton gained in five of the six national polls taken after the debate. This shouldn’t be too surprising: Media spin is what matters most after a debate, and Clinton received very positive coverage. That’s in contrast to her media coverage before the debate, which was very negative. What’s a little bit uncertain is how much ground she picked up. The average has her up 6 percentage points, but CNN found her down 1 point, and the Emerson College poll had her up 15 points.
0 Replies
 
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Mon 26 Oct, 2015 02:23 pm
@hawkeye10,
hawkeye10 wrote:

"How would you not be a third Obama Term" Hillary's answer is " I have a ****


If she'd actually said that, I'd find a way to vote for her as many times as I could
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Mon 26 Oct, 2015 03:14 pm
@djjd62,
It is a turn off and Hillary is so out of it that she did not know. Now she does she does. Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton is another Brittney Spears, not very good but she will always hit the mark the stage managers give her. The polsters of course letting her know where the mark is this time.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

Obama '08? - Discussion by sozobe
Let's get rid of the Electoral College - Discussion by Robert Gentel
McCain's VP: - Discussion by Cycloptichorn
McCain is blowing his election chances. - Discussion by McGentrix
Food Stamp Turkeys - Discussion by H2O MAN
The 2008 Democrat Convention - Discussion by Lash
Snowdon is a dummy - Discussion by cicerone imposter
GAFFNEY: Whose side is Obama on? - Discussion by gungasnake
 
  1. Forums
  2. » The D Debate
  3. » Page 2
Copyright © 2019 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.04 seconds on 11/20/2019 at 02:54:40